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Re: Rainwater collection

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  • thorthesailor
    Whence comes the water in the well? Michael
    Message 1 of 32 , Apr 30, 2012
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      Whence comes the water in the well?

      Michael


      --- In SimplySolar@yahoogroups.com, "Lawrence" <lawrencerayburn@...> wrote:
      >
      > I always laugh when I see discussions on collecting rainwater to be used on gardens or through solar heaters for showering, etc. I live
      > in the desert of SW Texas...and we don't get enough rain to collect.
      >
      > You have to have a well and the good thing is there's plenty of real
      > estate to place solar PV panels on to pump a well and irrigate an
      > enclosed garden.
      >
      > Anyone interested in off grid living in fertile desert areas of SW
      > Texas...be advised land is around $300/acre. You can build your own
      > secluded oasis for not much money.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In SimplySolar@yahoogroups.com, Ryan Riehl <real246@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks for the suggestions so far!
      > >
      > > I'm definitely going to set up a system to collect the rain water. We've
      > > considered aquaponics for the greenhouse and will at least try it, just not
      > > that good at fish stuff, something else to learn I suppose.
      > >
      > > As for a multi-tank setup for the solar hot water, I'd think that would
      > > create surface area and hence more opportunities for loss of energy and
      > > higher cost because I'd have more surface are to insulate as well. Thoughts?
      > >
      > > On Fri, Apr 27, 2012 at 9:46 PM, Bob Keeland <keelandb@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I suggest that you add large water tanks (at least 1000 gallon or larger)
      > > > to collect rainwater off your roof.
      > > > BobK
      > > >
      > > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------
      > > > * From: * Ryan Riehl <real246@>;
      > > > * To: * <SimplySolar@yahoogroups.com>;
      > > > * Subject: * [SimplySolar] Intro
      > > > * Sent: * Fri, Apr 27, 2012 11:04:56 AM
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hello fellow Solar Enthusiasts,
      > > >
      > > > I'm obviously new here and want to introduce myself a bit. I've been
      > > > dabbling in solar, mostly PV, stuff for a few years now. I've built my own
      > > > solar panel from a bunch of broken pv cells I bought from ebay a few years
      > > > back and bought a charge controller and batter to accompany it so i could
      > > > learn. Over the years I did many little projects like that.
      > > >
      > > > Now I'm ready for the big time!
      > > >
      > > > I've managed to collect enough cash and build a house of my own on some
      > > > property that I have. My wife and I are committed to an off-the-grid
      > > > lifestyle once this house it completely built.
      > > >
      > > > We want:
      > > >
      > > > 1) solar domestic water heating
      > > > 2) solar electricity
      > > > 3) solar radiant heat built into the concrete slab.
      > > > 4) Compressed Earth Block (CEB) exterior/interior wall construction
      > > > 5) Greenhouse for our fruits and veggies (we are pretty much completely
      > > > vegetarians)
      > > > 6) Composting for excellent recycling
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > If you have any thing to add I welcome the comments and the criticisms.
      > > > Some people think I'm a bit extreme but I think that is what our planet
      > > > needs, a change!
      > > >
      > > > -Ryan
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • cjecje1
      Something that is nice is to leave a small light bulb (in a trouble light) on in the bottom drawer of your tool cabinet. Warm tools on a cold morning are
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 15
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        Something that is nice is to leave a small light bulb (in a trouble light) on in the bottom drawer of your tool cabinet. Warm tools on a cold morning are like dying and going straight to workman-heaven.

        Older tools were made differently and from different cast iron. New cast iron is often more like steel when it comes to quality. I think a lot of present day cast iron is made from not very well sorted scrap - rather than from just high quality ore.

        A convection or low powered wall collector seems like it would serve you well. If you want some instant-enthusiasm just make your self a small cheap prototype - paint a long box black inside and tape some clear plastic to one open long side.

        stephen
        ------------



        On Jan 14, 2016, at 10:40 PM, mranum@... [SimplySolar] <SimplySolar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        Thanks the input guys, you've given me some things to think about. Building a collector or two on the outside of my shop may be what I will end up doing, seems like its the most viable option. This isn't intended to be my sole source of heat but rather a suppliment.

        I heat my shop now with a high efficient LP direct vent furnace. I do not typically heat it at night, generally daylight hours 80% of the time. I use 100# cylinders(my own) for gas. I've had people tell me I can't do that without developing rust issues on my tools because of the temperature swings. But I can say that after 20 years I have never had any issues with rust. I use a lot of old hand tools(early 1900's) with lots of cast iron but no rust.
        I neglected to give my location earlier but I am in central Wisconsin.
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