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Re: [SherlineCNC] Stepper motor size?

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  • S DEBRUYN
    Thanks for the reply Tom. Since you mentioned the spindle cutting out under heavy load. I have another question. The mill I purchased doesnt have a spindle
    Message 1 of 7 , May 1, 2007
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      Thanks for the reply Tom.
      Since you mentioned the spindle cutting out under heavy load. I have another
      question. The mill I purchased doesnt have a spindle motor. Is there a
      better motor I could use before I purchase one from Sherline. I thought
      maybe an old servo motor or maybe a small 3 phase AC motor with a VFD drive.
      Maybe you guys have been down this road as well?


      >From: Tom Hubin <thubin@...>
      >Reply-To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
      >To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [SherlineCNC] Stepper motor size?
      >Date: Tue, 01 May 2007 02:53:29 -0400
      >
      >Hello Shawn,
      >
      >You should do fine with 125 oz-in motors. That is close to what Sherline
      >sells. You only loose steps if you try to run the machine faster than
      >the steppers can do the job. In other words, you can loose steps with
      >any stepper. If you loose steps then you need to lighten the load by
      >slower feedrate or shallower cuts.
      >
      >I use dual axis motors on my Sherline 5410 CNC mill. I often use the
      >handwheel to do something manually. I also use the handwheel when I have
      >problems with an axis loosing steps or stalling. With power off you can
      >use the handwheel to see if the axis is binding.
      >
      >I use a PMDX 4 axis controller (model 150 I think) with only 3 axis
      >driver boards. I will add a fourth driver board if I ever get a CNC
      >rotary stage.
      >
      >I do drawings and dimensions with Vellum and print on paper. Nothing
      >special about Vellum. Just a drafting program that I happen to have.
      >
      >I type Gcode with a plain text editor.
      >
      >I run TurboCnc version 4.something under DOS. I start with Windows 98
      >then reboot to DOS, then start TurboCnc, then load my Gcode program.
      >
      >I have a Sherline 4400 manual lathe that I started using recently. I
      >have the CNC upgrade kit for it but have not yet installed it. I will
      >use the steppers that I got from Sherline when I bought my mill.
      >
      >I recently got new steppers for my mill. Double stack, something like
      >200 oz-in. They do push a harder than the old steppers but I don't know
      >if that will make any real difference. When I do heavy cuts the spindle
      >can still seize even if the steppers don't stall as easily. Jan 2006 I
      >paid about $45 for each of the new steppers.
      >
      >Tom Hubin
      >thubin@...
      >
      >*****************************
      >
      >shawncd2001 wrote:
      > >
      > > I recently bought two older spectralight cnc machines. One is a lathe
      > > and one a mill. Both are sherline models enclosed in a spectralite
      > > enclouser. I was told mid 80's. The lathe came with stepper motors and
      > >
      > > the mill did not. Niether have controllers. I would like to know what
      > > everyone is using for controllers and what size stepper motors to use
      > > on the mill. I can purchase some 125oz bipolar double end units for
      > > $25each. But I'm not sure if this is enough power. I see alot of guys
      > > installing 180-260oz motors. Will there be alot of lost steps with the
      > >
      > > smaller motors? Should I shoot for the bigger motors.
      > > Any help would be appreciated.
      > > Newbie to the mini lathe/mill world...
      >
    • Ron Ginger
      ... I think 125 oz-in is on the light side- it will work, many have done that, but at todays prices for better steppers I would not use them. Homeshopcnc has a
      Message 2 of 7 , May 1, 2007
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        >
        > I recently bought two older spectralight cnc machines. One is a lathe
        > and one a mill. Both are sherline models enclosed in a spectralite
        > enclouser. I was told mid 80's. The lathe came with stepper motors and
        > the mill did not. Niether have controllers. I would like to know what
        > everyone is using for controllers and what size stepper motors to use
        > on the mill. I can purchase some 125oz bipolar double end units for
        > $25each. But I'm not sure if this is enough power. I see alot of guys
        > installing 180-260oz motors. Will there be alot of lost steps with the
        > smaller motors? Should I shoot for the bigger motors.
        > Any help would be appreciated.
        > Newbie to the mini lathe/mill world...
        >

        I think 125 oz-in is on the light side- it will work, many have done
        that, but at todays prices for better steppers I would not use them.
        Homeshopcnc has a 262 oz-in motor for $42, $45 for dual shaft. There are
        many others with similar deals.

        Why start a conversion now that is undersize by all current standards?

        ron ginger
      • Ron Ginger
        ... I dont think you can do better than the Sherline DC motor. The old AC ones were wimpy, but they have not been sold for many years now. The DC one has more
        Message 3 of 7 , May 2, 2007
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          > Since you mentioned the spindle cutting out under heavy load. I have another
          > question. The mill I purchased doesnt have a spindle motor. Is there a
          > better motor I could use before I purchase one from Sherline. I thought
          > maybe an old servo motor or maybe a small 3 phase AC motor with a VFD drive.
          > Maybe you guys have been down this road as well?

          I dont think you can do better than the Sherline DC motor. The old AC
          ones were wimpy, but they have not been sold for many years now. The DC
          one has more than enough torque for anything the Sherline can cut. In
          fact, many owners of Taig and other machines buy Sherline motors for
          them. Its has a good speed range and is reasonable size. Its not cheap,
          but its a good motor.

          ron ginger
        • David Clark
          ... While concurring with all that Ron has to say above, let me add another reason for buying Sherline s motor. I ve purchased a total of 6 Sherline lathes and
          Message 4 of 7 , May 2, 2007
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            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Ron Ginger <ronginger@...> wrote:
            >

            > I dont think you can do better than the Sherline DC motor. The old AC
            > ones were wimpy, but they have not been sold for many years now. The DC
            > one has more than enough torque for anything the Sherline can cut. In
            > fact, many owners of Taig and other machines buy Sherline motors for
            > them. Its has a good speed range and is reasonable size. Its not cheap,
            > but its a good motor.
            >
            > ron ginger
            >

            While concurring with all that Ron has to say above, let me add
            another reason for buying Sherline's motor. I've purchased a total of
            6 Sherline lathes and mills, 2 for home and the others at my former
            workplace. The only problem I've ever had was that one motor
            controller failed after a few months. I telephoned Sherline, and the
            same day they express shipped me a new, complete motor and controller
            assembly, no charge, trusting me to return the failed one in the same
            box. As I recall, they even paid the return shipping.

            I've seen several similar stories posted here, including one in which
            Sherline replaced a motor that was simply worn out from many years of
            hard duty. I've seen nothing but high praise for Sherline's support
            and service.

            An American company providing this level of quality, integrity, and
            service will get my business even at a substantially higher cost. If
            for no other reason than my belief that we should preserve and protect
            endangered species.

            DC
          • Jerry Jankura
            ... Regarding Sherline s motor & speed control - it was interesting at the last NAMES show to see the Sherline motor & kbic controller used on some of Peter
            Message 5 of 7 , May 2, 2007
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              Ron Ginger wrote:
              >> Since you mentioned the spindle cutting out under heavy load. I have another
              >> question. The mill I purchased doesnt have a spindle motor. Is there a
              >> better motor I could use before I purchase one from Sherline. I thought
              >> maybe an old servo motor or maybe a small 3 phase AC motor with a VFD drive.
              >> Maybe you guys have been down this road as well?
              >>
              >
              > I dont think you can do better than the Sherline DC motor. The old AC
              > ones were wimpy, but they have not been sold for many years now. The DC
              > one has more than enough torque for anything the Sherline can cut. In
              > fact, many owners of Taig and other machines buy Sherline motors for
              > them. Its has a good speed range and is reasonable size. Its not cheap,
              > but its a good motor.
              >
              Regarding Sherline's motor & speed control - it was interesting at the
              last NAMES show to see the Sherline motor & kbic controller used on some
              of Peter Renzetti's (hope I spelled it correctly) home made tools and a
              few other items.

              -- Jerry Jankura
              Strongsville, Ohio
              So many toys.... So little time....



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