Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

CNC lathe

Expand Messages
  • Paul Huffman
    Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of shafts, starting with 5/8 diameter
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
      capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of shafts,
      starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material is
      12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
      Thanks,
      Paul in OKC
    • David Clark
      ... Hello Paul, Welcome to the group. I recently turned a couple of 1/2-20 threads about 5 inches long on 12L14. This with the Sherline threading attachment
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Huffman" <phdesigns1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
        > capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of shafts,
        > starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material is
        > 12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
        > Thanks,
        > Paul in OKC
        >

        Hello Paul,

        Welcome to the group. I recently turned a couple of 1/2-20 threads
        about 5 inches long on 12L14. This with the Sherline threading
        attachment turning by hand. No problem at all, 12L14 machines so
        beautifully. As I recall I took about .005" cuts, diminishing towards
        the finish. I think each shaft took maybe 20 - 30 minutes. I never hurry.

        Depending what you mean by a lot, you may want to check some of the
        various schemes others have set up to do full CNC threading.

        Another approach is to use a die. I'd think about rigging up a die
        holder to follow the bed, put a longer handle on the end of the
        spindle and crank 'em out.

        Really depends mostly on the extent to which you're going into
        production here.

        DC
      • Paul W. Chamberlain
        I think a 5/8 die would put more torque on the material than the chuck could hold... at least with standard coarse or fine thread. The Sherline chuck jaws
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I think a 5/8 die would put more torque on the material than the chuck
          could hold... at least with standard coarse or fine thread. The Sherline
          chuck jaws don't have a whole lot of contact area.

          I die thread 5/8-40 on 1144 steel all the time with my 7x12 and a 4"
          chuck. Even so, I need to use the chuck key for leverage (spindle off,
          turning by hand).

          My Sherline CNC 4400 is from IMService with their threading encoder. It
          sure beats the heck out of change gear threading. Lathe threading is
          much better when dead straight threads are needed, as with fixed piston
          rods. Dies are notorious for "drunken threads".

          I do use tailstock supported die holders on my other lathes, which helps
          allot in keeping the threads straight. The one Taig sells works great on
          the Sherlines. The guide shank screws on Sherline's tailstock drill
          chuck arbor (3/8-24 thread).

          I also have Sherline's Threading Attachment for my manual 4000, but
          haven't put it to work yet.

          Paul, Central OR

          *****

          David Clark wrote:

          >--- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Huffman" <phdesigns1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >>Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
          >>capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of shafts,
          >>starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material is
          >>12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
          >>Thanks,
          >>Paul in OKC
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >Hello Paul,
          >
          >Welcome to the group. I recently turned a couple of 1/2-20 threads
          >about 5 inches long on 12L14. This with the Sherline threading
          >attachment turning by hand. No problem at all, 12L14 machines so
          >beautifully. As I recall I took about .005" cuts, diminishing towards
          >the finish. I think each shaft took maybe 20 - 30 minutes. I never hurry.
          >
          >Depending what you mean by a lot, you may want to check some of the
          >various schemes others have set up to do full CNC threading.
          >
          >Another approach is to use a die. I'd think about rigging up a die
          >holder to follow the bed, put a longer handle on the end of the
          >spindle and crank 'em out.
          >
          >Really depends mostly on the extent to which you're going into
          >production here.
          >
          >DC
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Paul Huffman
          I need about 200 at a time. I have access to the machines where I work, and can make one of these on a manual machine in about 10 minutes or less. Just trying
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I need about 200 at a time. I have access to the machines where I
            work, and can make one of these on a manual machine in about 10
            minutes or less. Just trying to get away from standing there to make
            them. I have another shop making them for me at the moment. Time per
            part is not too much a factor, because I will be able to do other
            things while it is running.


            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "David Clark" <dcclark111@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Huffman" <phdesigns1@>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
            > > capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of
            shafts,
            > > starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material
            is
            > > 12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
            > > Thanks,
            > > Paul in OKC
            > >
            >
            > Hello Paul,
            >
            > Welcome to the group. I recently turned a couple of 1/2-20 threads
            > about 5 inches long on 12L14. This with the Sherline threading
            > attachment turning by hand. No problem at all, 12L14 machines so
            > beautifully. As I recall I took about .005" cuts, diminishing
            towards
            > the finish. I think each shaft took maybe 20 - 30 minutes. I never
            hurry.
            >
            > Depending what you mean by a lot, you may want to check some of the
            > various schemes others have set up to do full CNC threading.
            >
            > Another approach is to use a die. I'd think about rigging up a die
            > holder to follow the bed, put a longer handle on the end of the
            > spindle and crank 'em out.
            >
            > Really depends mostly on the extent to which you're going into
            > production here.
            >
            > DC
            >
          • Dave Hylands
            Hi Paul, ... I tried the manual threading attachment, and wasn t impressed. I made this:
            Message 5 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Paul,

              On 2/2/07, Paul Huffman <phdesigns1@...> wrote:
              > I need about 200 at a time. I have access to the machines where I
              > work, and can make one of these on a manual machine in about 10
              > minutes or less. Just trying to get away from standing there to make
              > them. I have another shop making them for me at the moment. Time per
              > part is not too much a factor, because I will be able to do other
              > things while it is running.

              I tried the manual threading attachment, and wasn't impressed. I made this:
              <http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/Projects/Drill-Chuck-Mount/>

              I've been really impressed with the CNC, although threading is still
              bit tricky to get the right depth of cut, etc. I put together a little
              video clip on doing some small threading:
              <http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/CNC/CNC-Threading/>

              If you look at the bottom of that page, you'll see a section called
              "Depth of Cut". That particular technique doesn't work well on a
              Sherline (not enough horsepower), and there's no way it would be able
              to a 5/8" thread using that technique. I need to explore the
              "alternative" below it.

              --
              Dave Hylands
              Vancouver, BC, Canada
              http://www.DaveHylands.com/
            • Fred Smith
              ... shafts, ... The Sherline spindle motor is able to cut threads in steel, but you need to be careful not to overload and stall it by taking too deep of a
              Message 6 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Huffman" <phdesigns1@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
                > capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of
                shafts,
                > starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material is
                > 12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
                > Thanks,
                > Paul in OKC
                >

                The Sherline spindle motor is able to cut threads in steel, but you
                need to be careful not to overload and stall it by taking too deep of
                a cut. This shows some steel threads that we cut with our system:

                http://www.imsrv.com/sherlinemachines/#lathe

                The process:

                http://www.imsrv.com/deskcnc/lathe/desktopcncthreading.pdf

                5/8-18 is OK, but 5/8-11 is almost too coarse for CR1018. The 12L14
                alloy will probably be OK. I would set up with flood cutting oil to
                insure that your tool stays well lubricated and you won't have to
                stand there and re-lub after every pass.

                With the right measurement tools, there is no problem with setting
                and holding size.

                Fred Smith - IMService
              • Paul Huffman
                Well, I do not have any lathe at the moment, and probably would not consider threading on the Sherline unless it was cnc. I am a machinist by trade, and love
                Message 7 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Well, I do not have any lathe at the moment, and probably would not
                  consider threading on the Sherline unless it was cnc. I am a machinist
                  by trade, and love to build things. My curiousity is just about how
                  well the Sherline threads. Like I said, I have these made now, at a
                  reasonable cost, just want to get them back in house. I have two large
                  manual lathes at the shop, just don't want to be there more than I
                  already am! Buying anything but a benchtop cnc machine is as I'm sure
                  you know, not an economic reality, at least for me.
                • Ron Ginger
                  ... In my view this is well beyond the capability of a Sherline. I have a hard time with threads that big on my 11x48 Rockwell. Im sure you could do it- at
                  Message 8 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > Posted by: "Paul Huffman" phdesigns1@... phdesigns1
                    > Date: Thu Feb 1, 2007 2:34 pm ((PST))
                    >
                    > Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
                    > capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of shafts,
                    > starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material is
                    > 12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
                    > Thanks,
                    > Paul in OKC

                    In my view this is well beyond the capability of a Sherline. I have a
                    hard time with threads that big on my 11x48 Rockwell. Im sure you could
                    do it- at maybe .005" per cut, but that would take forever- and even
                    with CNC you cannot simply load a part and come back tomorrw to see if
                    its done- they do need attention.

                    ron ginger
                  • David Clark
                    ... I have felt your pain. The first few times I tried to use it I nearly gave up in frustration. The cheap aluminum gears jamming or slipping out of mesh was
                    Message 9 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Hylands" <dhylands@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I tried the manual threading attachment, and wasn't impressed.

                      I have felt your pain. The first few times I tried to use it I nearly
                      gave up in frustration. The cheap aluminum gears jamming or slipping
                      out of mesh was the worst problem.

                      But, I kept at it and gradually learned. Slathered all the moving
                      parts with PFTE grease while keeping the parts held by clamping force
                      squeaky clean. Got a feel for how much clearance made the gears happy.
                      Got the right arraingment of shim washers to keep the gears running
                      true (sort of) without rubbing (much).

                      Now, while I certainly would not say I'm "impressed"; I've gotten to
                      where I can do useful work with it. I've since purchased dies and a
                      tailstock holder for all of the small sizes I use: up to 10-32. So I
                      don't need it very often. But when I do, it works well enough, and
                      that's not so often that I can justify upgrading the capability.

                      DC
                    • Paul Huffman
                      I realize that it is not a total self reliant thing. I would be close by =8^). I figure is probably is a bit over what the lathe would be best suited for. the
                      Message 10 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I realize that it is not a total self reliant thing. I would be close
                        by =8^). I figure is probably is a bit over what the lathe would be
                        best suited for. the threads are fine pitch, so that would be a bit
                        better. When I make them myself now, I run them on a 20"x96" lathe!
                        The chuck barely closes that small.


                        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Ron Ginger <ronginger@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > Posted by: "Paul Huffman" phdesigns1@... phdesigns1
                        > > Date: Thu Feb 1, 2007 2:34 pm ((PST))
                        > >
                        > > Hi all. New to the group. Curious about the machinig/threading
                        > > capabilities of the Sherline lathe. I need to make a lot of
                        shafts,
                        > > starting with 5/8 diameter material, with a 5/8 thread. Material
                        is
                        > > 12L14. longest machined area would be about 5".
                        > > Thanks,
                        > > Paul in OKC
                        >
                        > In my view this is well beyond the capability of a Sherline. I have
                        a
                        > hard time with threads that big on my 11x48 Rockwell. Im sure you
                        could
                        > do it- at maybe .005" per cut, but that would take forever- and
                        even
                        > with CNC you cannot simply load a part and come back tomorrw to see
                        if
                        > its done- they do need attention.
                        >
                        > ron ginger
                        >
                      • Alan KM6VV
                        David, It seems HOLDING small stock for threading (5-40, 6-32) is much harder in the 3-jaw chuck. I made tailstock die holders for the sizes of dies I use,
                        Message 11 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          David,

                          It seems HOLDING small stock for threading (5-40, 6-32) is much harder in
                          the 3-jaw chuck. I made tailstock die holders for the sizes of dies I use,
                          but the stock slips! I'm looking for a better way to hold the stock.

                          Alan KM6VV

                          > -----Original Message-----
                          > Behalf Of David Clark
                          >
                          > --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Hylands" <dhylands@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I tried the manual threading attachment, and wasn't impressed.
                          >
                          > I have felt your pain. The first few times I tried to use it I nearly
                          > gave up in frustration. The cheap aluminum gears jamming or slipping
                          > out of mesh was the worst problem.
                          >
                          > But, I kept at it and gradually learned. Slathered all the moving
                          > parts with PFTE grease while keeping the parts held by clamping force
                          > squeaky clean. Got a feel for how much clearance made the gears happy.
                          > Got the right arraingment of shim washers to keep the gears running
                          > true (sort of) without rubbing (much).
                          >
                          > Now, while I certainly would not say I'm "impressed"; I've gotten to
                          > where I can do useful work with it. I've since purchased dies and a
                          > tailstock holder for all of the small sizes I use: up to 10-32. So I
                          > don't need it very often. But when I do, it works well enough, and
                          > that's not so often that I can justify upgrading the capability.
                          >
                          > DC
                          >
                        • David Clark
                          ... harder in ... I ve done well with this: take a piece of 1/4 diameter aluminum about 3/4 long and drill a hole through it the size of your stock. Cut a
                          Message 12 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Alan KM6VV" <KM6VV@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > It seems HOLDING small stock for threading (5-40, 6-32) is much
                            harder in
                            > the 3-jaw chuck.

                            I've done well with this: take a piece of 1/4" diameter aluminum about
                            3/4" long and drill a hole through it the size of your stock. Cut a
                            slit down one side of it with a slitting saw, or jeweler's saw, then
                            use that to clamp your stock in the 3 jaw with the slit between 2 jaws.

                            You could elaborate this a couple of ways: use hex stock or machine
                            flats on 3 sides, and/or make 3 partial slits in a longer piece. Sort
                            of a custom collet squeezed by the chuck.

                            Clean, dry, aluminum has a very high coefficient of friction with most
                            metals. This should work. (A drop of Krazy Glue in there would pretty
                            well guarantee it. See previous post on holding small parts.)

                            DC
                          • David Clark
                            ... For any kind of productivity, or in anything less machinable than 12L14,or maybe soft brass, I agree. ... take forever However, I have done threads nearly
                            Message 13 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Ron Ginger <ronginger@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > In my view this is well beyond the capability of a Sherline.

                              For any kind of productivity, or in anything less machinable than
                              12L14,or maybe soft brass, I agree.

                              > ...Im sure you could do it- at maybe .005" per cut, but that would
                              take forever

                              However, I have done threads nearly that size and length (1/2-20 x 4")
                              on a Sherline with manual threading attachment. A 1/2-20 thread is
                              only .032" deep. At .005" per cut plus a couple of spring cuts and a
                              finishing cut that's maybe 8 - 10 cuts. Figure a minute or 2 per cut
                              and the job's a half hour, tops; from start to finish including
                              set-up. Not forever.

                              I don't wish to be contentious, but I think it's important to inform
                              the new hands what their equipment CAN do, not only what it can't.

                              DC
                            • Alan KM6VV
                              Hi David, OK, I m actually doing that. I have one for 1/8 stock (5-40), made up in brass with a larger diameter collar on one end. Maybe aluminum works
                              Message 14 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi David,

                                OK, I'm actually doing that. I have one for 1/8" stock (5-40), made up in
                                brass with a larger diameter "collar" on one end. Maybe aluminum works
                                better? DOES help to allow re-chucking, 'tho.

                                Didn't think of the Krazy glue!

                                Alan KM6VV


                                > Behalf Of David Clark
                                > >
                                > > It seems HOLDING small stock for threading (5-40, 6-32) is much
                                > harder in
                                > > the 3-jaw chuck.
                                >
                                > I've done well with this: take a piece of 1/4" diameter aluminum about
                                > 3/4" long and drill a hole through it the size of your stock. Cut a
                                > slit down one side of it with a slitting saw, or jeweler's saw, then
                                > use that to clamp your stock in the 3 jaw with the slit between 2 jaws.
                                >
                                > You could elaborate this a couple of ways: use hex stock or machine
                                > flats on 3 sides, and/or make 3 partial slits in a longer piece. Sort
                                > of a custom collet squeezed by the chuck.
                                >
                                > Clean, dry, aluminum has a very high coefficient of friction with most
                                > metals. This should work. (A drop of Krazy Glue in there would pretty
                                > well guarantee it. See previous post on holding small parts.)
                                >
                                > DC
                              • David Clark
                                ... I think you ll find it works a lot better. Brass is really pretty slippery stuff. I d never use it for a collet, clamp, or anything else that relied on
                                Message 15 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Alan KM6VV" <KM6VV@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Maybe aluminum works better?

                                  I think you'll find it works a lot better. Brass is really pretty
                                  slippery stuff. I'd never use it for a collet, clamp, or anything
                                  else that relied on it's friction. I fact, I routinely make bushings
                                  from it!

                                  If anyone would like to see some analysis on this, email me direct.
                                  I've sworn off doing math in public.

                                  DC
                                • Alan KM6VV
                                  Hi David, Yeah, I should have thought of that! Having brass rod stock on hand spoils one! I posted a pix of two old split brass collets I made while making my
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Feb 2, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi David,

                                    Yeah, I should have thought of that! Having brass rod stock on hand
                                    spoils one!

                                    I posted a pix of two old split brass collets I made while making my
                                    steam engines.

                                    Pix in the photos of the list under "KM6VV Engines", the last photo.

                                    Alan KM6VV


                                    David Clark wrote:

                                    >--- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Alan KM6VV" <KM6VV@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >> Maybe aluminum works better?
                                    >>
                                    >>
                                    >
                                    >I think you'll find it works a lot better. Brass is really pretty
                                    >slippery stuff. I'd never use it for a collet, clamp, or anything
                                    >else that relied on it's friction. I fact, I routinely make bushings
                                    >from it!
                                    >
                                    >If anyone would like to see some analysis on this, email me direct.
                                    >I've sworn off doing math in public.
                                    >
                                    >DC
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Richard L. Wurdack
                                    David, This should be a very straightforward analysis. . . :
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Feb 3, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      David,

                                      This should be a very straightforward analysis. . . :<)

                                      Dick
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: David Clark
                                      To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Friday, February 02, 2007 4:42 PM
                                      Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: CNC lathe


                                      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Alan KM6VV" <KM6VV@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Maybe aluminum works better?

                                      I think you'll find it works a lot better. Brass is really pretty
                                      slippery stuff. I'd never use it for a collet, clamp, or anything
                                      else that relied on it's friction. I fact, I routinely make bushings
                                      from it!

                                      If anyone would like to see some analysis on this, email me direct.
                                      I've sworn off doing math in public.

                                      DC





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • David Clark
                                      ... It is. So why don t you do it this time? Explain to the group how to calculate the force needed to overcome static friction between different materials
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Feb 3, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Richard L. Wurdack" <dickw@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        > This should be a very straightforward analysis. . . :<)
                                        >

                                        It is. So why don't you do it this time? Explain to the group how to
                                        calculate the force needed to overcome static friction between
                                        different materials with a given area of contact.

                                        Then you can deal with the responses listing all the factors you've
                                        neglected (lubrication, elastic deformation, phase of the moon, etc),
                                        questioning your grasp of reality, and asserting the futility of ever
                                        trying to calculate anything.

                                        Enjoy,

                                        DC

                                        (I'm sticking to machining.)
                                      • Ron Ginger
                                        ... I agree the Sherline can be made to do some pretty big work, and for an ocassional job its fine to stretch your machine. However, in this case the original
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Feb 3, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          >>
                                          >>In my view this is well beyond the capability of a Sherline.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > For any kind of productivity, or in anything less machinable than
                                          > 12L14,or maybe soft brass, I agree.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >>...Im sure you could do it- at maybe .005" per cut, but that would
                                          >> take forever
                                          >
                                          > However, I have done threads nearly that size and length (1/2-20 x 4")
                                          > on a Sherline with manual threading attachment. A 1/2-20 thread is
                                          > only .032" deep. At .005" per cut plus a couple of spring cuts and a
                                          > finishing cut that's maybe 8 - 10 cuts. Figure a minute or 2 per cut
                                          > and the job's a half hour, tops; from start to finish including
                                          > set-up. Not forever.
                                          >
                                          > I don't wish to be contentious, but I think it's important to inform
                                          > the new hands what their equipment CAN do, not only what it can't.
                                          >
                                          > DC
                                          >

                                          I agree the Sherline can be made to do some pretty big work, and for an
                                          ocassional job its fine to stretch your machine. However, in this case
                                          the original question was about buying a Sherline specifically to
                                          dosomething like 200 of these as a production job.

                                          There is a big difference between doign a one-off job and setting up a
                                          production machine.

                                          ron ginger
                                        • David Clark
                                          ... Sure, that s why I said: For any kind of productivity.... DC
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Feb 3, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Ron Ginger <ronginger@...> wrote:

                                            >
                                            > There is a big difference between doign a one-off job and setting up
                                            > a production machine.
                                            >

                                            Sure, that's why I said: For any kind of productivity....

                                            DC
                                          • Jerry Jankura
                                            Of course - he may have been planning on using the production job as an excuse to get a Sherline lathe to use for model making. Often, when there is some item
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Feb 3, 2007
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Of course - he may have been planning on using the production job as an excuse to get a Sherline lathe to use for model making. Often, when there is some item that we need around the house, I'll use the cost of that item as a budget to buy the material and tools to make the item; then, when I'm finished, I'll have the tool for other projects.


                                              > I agree the Sherline can be made to do some pretty big work, and for an
                                              > ocassional job its fine to stretch your machine. However, in this case
                                              > the original question was about buying a Sherline specifically to
                                              > dosomething like 200 of these as a production job.
                                              >
                                              > There is a big difference between doign a one-off job and setting up a
                                              > production machine.
                                              >
                                              > ron ginger
                                              >
                                              -- Jerry Jankura
                                              Strongsville, Ohio
                                              So many toys.... So little time....
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.