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More on vac plate ideas

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  • Mark
    Remember that holding force is lbs/sq-in... This means that the area of the workpiece that is under vac should be maximized. The holes in the vac plate can
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2006
      Remember that holding force is lbs/sq-in... This means that the
      area of the workpiece that is under vac should be maximized. The
      holes in the vac plate can be very small, as there's no air flow.
      So, a plate with 1/16 inch holes spaced on 1/2 inch centers would
      probably be most effective using milled-out recesses around each
      hole that are separated by a web of perhaps 1/16 inch wide lands.

      Almost as effective would be penny-sized round recesses, to
      allow one to just plop pennies into the exposed ones. Picking
      them out, however, is fun... Masking tape works well and comes
      off easily, as one of the better ways to block unused holes.

      Double-sided masking tape from signmaking supply shops is pretty
      nice stuff, and comes off easily.

      I first read about the superglue trick in one of W.R. "Bill' Smith's
      great books on clockmaking - lots of other good ideas too... /mark
    • Alan Marconett
      HI Mark, Thanks for the comments. I wonder if pressing the board down with weights initially would result in getting the warp out? Actually, I think one would
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2006
        HI Mark,

        Thanks for the comments.

        I wonder if pressing the board down with weights initially would result in
        getting the warp out? Actually, I think one would have to get the warp out
        BEFORE adhering it to the tooling plate or fixture.

        Of course making a vacuum plate is a perfect task for CNC. These guys
        (dudes?) detail making a "Vacuum breakout box" on their website:

        http://www.cncdudez.com/

        I initially went there to get the design of a USB PIC dongle for CNC.

        I use masking tape an Mylar part bags on my tooling plate to keep the swarf
        out of the unused holes. I also use Mylar bags taped to the front and back
        of the Sherline ways to keep swarf off of the Y axis lead screw.

        I've now got a COUPLE of ideas to try for improving my PCBs.

        Alan KM6VV

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Mark
        > Sent: Friday, September 01, 2006 8:27 AM
        > To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [SherlineCNC] More on vac plate ideas
        >
        > Remember that holding force is lbs/sq-in... This means that the
        > area of the workpiece that is under vac should be maximized. The
        > holes in the vac plate can be very small, as there's no air flow.
        > So, a plate with 1/16 inch holes spaced on 1/2 inch centers would
        > probably be most effective using milled-out recesses around each
        > hole that are separated by a web of perhaps 1/16 inch wide lands.
        >
        > Almost as effective would be penny-sized round recesses, to
        > allow one to just plop pennies into the exposed ones. Picking
        > them out, however, is fun... Masking tape works well and comes
        > off easily, as one of the better ways to block unused holes.
        >
        > Double-sided masking tape from signmaking supply shops is pretty
        > nice stuff, and comes off easily.
        >
        > I first read about the superglue trick in one of W.R. "Bill' Smith's
        > great books on clockmaking - lots of other good ideas too... /mark
        >
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