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Re: What cutting tools are needed.

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  • qcwmark
    Julie, I would consider a bar of soap to be a 3d shape. To fully discirbe it you would need instructions in three dimensions. I suggest you get some tapered
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 30, 2006
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      Julie,

      I would consider a bar of soap to be a 3d shape. To fully discirbe
      it you would need instructions in three dimensions.

      I suggest you get some tapered flat single edge cutters. These are
      a cone shape with half the cone ground away to leave a flat edge.
      See for instance Profilers at
      http://www.antaresinc.net/2004EngCutSet.html

      The advantage over multi-flute tools is they clear the wax better
      and are less likely to melt it, and they can be reground.

      The advantage over straight end mills is they get stronger as you
      move away from the tip, and thus you can maintain a fine tip while
      still taking a deep cut. For instance, a tipical .005" end mill has
      a length of cut of .015". Any longer than three times diameter will
      make for a weak tool which is easy to overload with side forces and
      snap. However, a tapered cutter just gets thicker, so the length is
      not limited, and you can cut .120" deep with a .005" cutter (in wax)
      without snapping it.

      Another advantage is cost. You can get about four .005" tapered
      single edge cutters for the cost of one .005" end mill, and as
      mentioned you can have them reground also.

      Of course, the disadvantage is you will have to live with a draft
      angle on vertical edges of your model, as the tapered cutter will
      have a side angle of 5-20 degrees, with the larger angles being more
      robust. This is not as much of a limitation as you might expect on
      many rounded forms, but on geometric shapes I will often follow with
      a profile cut using a straight cutter just to bring the walls up
      vertical.

      I would go with carbide, wax is more abrasive than you might think,
      and the carbide will hold it's edge beautifully.

      Of course this assumes that your CAM software has a tool definition
      included for a tapered cutter.

      Good luck, Mark

      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Julie" <jewel@...> wrote:
      >
      > I want to engrave lettering and logos into wax. I also would like
      to
      > do some 2d shapes into wax such as a bar of soap. I have
      everything up
      > and working but I have no idea of what cutting tools are needed
      for
      > these projects. Can anyone suggest a tutorial on cutting tools? I
      am
      > going to use some small dremel egraving bits for the lettering but
      > have no idea what to use for the 2d shapes and how to get them
      with a
      > smooth finish.
      >
      > Thanks
      >
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