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Re: [SherlineCNC] Dumb questions

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  • Steve
    You might want to take a look at : http://www.niagaracutter.com/techinfo/speed_feed.html Every one makes their cutters a little different and from a little
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 4, 2004
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      You might want to take a look at :
      http://www.niagaracutter.com/techinfo/speed_feed.html
      Every one makes their cutters a little different and from a little different
      steel, most cutter makers are more then happy to send you all kinds of free
      info about their cutters. It only does them good to give you info about how
      to get the best results from their tools. A big thing to remember is that
      the charts mostly count on ideal cutting, IE very strong machine, very
      smooth feeds, tightly controlled spindle speed and flood cooling. You'll
      probably need to knock the speed (rpm) down 10 or 20% and with the feed you
      mostly are looking for the chip load, so will need to reduce that by how
      ever much of a % you slowed down the spindle. The depth of cut depends on
      how much power you have at the spindle and how much force you can put on the
      machine before it starts to flex enough to mess with your chip load. The
      Sherline motors I've seen only have their rated hp when turning at their max
      speed. When you run it slower it's a guess as to how much the hp has been
      cut. You also have to knock off a little for the belt and spindle. On a
      really solid mill, with a good ruffing end mill, 1 1/2 the dia is pushing it
      about as far as I've gone. I never had much luck with more then 1/2 the dia
      on a Bridgeport type mill. With a Sherline, or other light machine, I would
      probably try .010 or .020 with larger end mills, maybe try pushing it to
      .050 with a good endmill with 5 or more cutting faces, and keep it at 1/2
      the dia on small ones. Mostly it's your own machine and a hobby or part time
      business, so using the machine up with heavy cuts probably isn't a good
      thing. There always is that thing in the back of my mind wondering how much
      the machine will do, so I tend to push it and find out before backing off.


      From: "Ron Davies" <rondavies@...>
      >
      > 2 Are there any rough guides anywhere as to the depth of cut and feed
      > rate that can be applied to different materials. I have tables in
      > handbooks but the quoted figures in these just jam the machine.
      >
    • Ron Thompson
      ... I think this is a good way to start. Push the speed and feed until you don t like the result and back off to the best settings. Ron Thompson On the
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 5, 2004
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        >There always is that thing in the back of my mind wondering how much
        >the machine will do, so I tend to push it and find out before backing off.

        I think this is a good way to start. Push the speed and feed until you don't like the result and back off to the best settings.

        Ron Thompson
        On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

        http://www.plansandprojects.com

        The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is
        to fill the world with fools.
        --Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Steve
        To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, December 05, 2004 2:05 AM
        Subject: Re: [SherlineCNC] Dumb questions


        You might want to take a look at :
        http://www.niagaracutter.com/techinfo/speed_feed.html
        Every one makes their cutters a little different and from a little different
        steel, most cutter makers are more then happy to send you all kinds of free
        info about their cutters. It only does them good to give you info about how
        to get the best results from their tools. A big thing to remember is that
        the charts mostly count on ideal cutting, IE very strong machine, very
        smooth feeds, tightly controlled spindle speed and flood cooling. You'll
        probably need to knock the speed (rpm) down 10 or 20% and with the feed you
        mostly are looking for the chip load, so will need to reduce that by how
        ever much of a % you slowed down the spindle. The depth of cut depends on
        how much power you have at the spindle and how much force you can put on the
        machine before it starts to flex enough to mess with your chip load. The
        Sherline motors I've seen only have their rated hp when turning at their max
        speed. When you run it slower it's a guess as to how much the hp has been
        cut. You also have to knock off a little for the belt and spindle. On a
        really solid mill, with a good ruffing end mill, 1 1/2 the dia is pushing it
        about as far as I've gone. I never had much luck with more then 1/2 the dia
        on a Bridgeport type mill. With a Sherline, or other light machine, I would
        probably try .010 or .020 with larger end mills, maybe try pushing it to
        .050 with a good endmill with 5 or more cutting faces, and keep it at 1/2
        the dia on small ones. Mostly it's your own machine and a hobby or part time
        business, so using the machine up with heavy cuts probably isn't a good
        thing. There always is that thing in the back of my mind wondering how much
        the machine will do, so I tend to push it and find out before backing off.


        From: "Ron Davies" <rondavies@...>
        >
        > 2 Are there any rough guides anywhere as to the depth of cut and feed
        > rate that can be applied to different materials. I have tables in
        > handbooks but the quoted figures in these just jam the machine.
        >


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      • Alan Marconett
        HI Ron, G0, G1, G2, G3 are modal , meaning they will stay around until changed. Others are modal as well. (RS-274). Alan KM6VV
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 5, 2004
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          HI Ron,

          G0, G1, G2, G3 are "modal", meaning they will stay around until
          changed. Others are modal as well. (RS-274).

          Alan KM6VV


          Ron Davies wrote:

          > Thank you Alan,Tom,Andy,testfly
          >
          > Another step forward.
          >
          > Next question - (not answered in the manual) is the command G00(rapid
          > positioning) just good for the line it appears on or should it stay in
          > effect until cancelled by a feedrate command.
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Ron
          >
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