Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: How do you do it?

Expand Messages
  • mc_n_g
    The SFM I personnaly believe do not apply to mini mills. The SFM are calcualted for regular Bport sized mills. You do not have the stability, weight and hp
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 30, 2004
      The SFM I personnaly believe do not apply to mini mills. The SFM
      are calcualted for regular Bport sized mills. You do not have the
      stability, weight and hp to cut that much with a sherline.
      I cut 7075 and 2024 with 1/16 to 3/8 end mills with the original
      Sherline spindle speed. I run anywhere from 1.5 to 9.0 sfm. Yes,
      it is slow and not as efficient as it should be. The thinner the
      cut the faster the sfm (if the diameter of the end mill can handle
      it).
      I am also not running coolant. I use a small shopvac to suck up
      the swarf to keep from recutting it. The depth of cut for slotting
      is never more than 1.0 X diameter of end mill.
      I am making my molds for an older plastic injection machine
      (Arburg). I am not having any problems with the molds when they are
      done. I am happy with the surface finish the Sherline is
      producing. I have only used a few cratex rubberized points to clean
      up a few small areas on bad cuts.
      I think you will do a lot of adjusting to your specific type of
      machining needs.

      mc_n_g



      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "kepello" <carl@l...> wrote:
      > Milling 6061-T6 aluminum. Sherline 2000 CNC. 10,000 rpm capable
      > spindle upgrade.
      >
      > What spindle speed, feed rates & depth of cut would you recommend
      > for 1/4" and 1/8" endmills?
      >
      > I will be doing some slotting and some profiling.
      >
      > Newbie. Prefer to start with something that works well. Perhaps
      > experiment from there. I seem to be told often to just try
      things,
      > break a few endmills, and learn the hard way.
      >
      > Carl
      >
      > PS. I think I have a handle on the formula for SFM. That seems
      to
      > be based on the maximum for the material. I am sure that chipload
      > is more specific to the cutter you are using, but have no idea
      what
      > the chipload is for the cutters I have. They came in a wooden
      block
      > with the mill package....
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.