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Re: Is this possible???

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  • efoda5446
    hey allan, thanks for responding. yes, it s a shallow box with components inside. you mention the throat being an issue, what exactly is that, the spindle?
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 29, 2004
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      hey allan, thanks for responding.

      yes, it's a shallow box with components inside.

      you mention the throat being an issue, what exactly is that, the
      spindle? i've been looking at diagrams of the 5400, but it doesn't
      specifically label "throat" as a part. basically your saying that the
      spindle needs to come out a bit to get around the edges of the box on
      the y axis, no? i think the 5400 comes with part no. 1297 which is the
      mill riser block, so i think i'm ok there. do you think the 5400 would
      have a problem with that alluminum cartridge thingy on the bottom?

      what mill sizes do you think would work, or rather, how does one just
      starting out figure out which mills/sizes to use? besides just asking
      people here would the "tabletop machining" book be a good resource for
      that?

      ok, sorry about all the q's. i just want to say thanks to everone for
      this board, it's really informative. i enjoy reading over your old
      posts. thanks. so far i think i'm swinging for the 5400 with mounts,
      then getting some 140 oz. steppers with the xylotex drivers and vector
      software. if anyone could recommend some additional tools/mills that i
      would need to try make this box a reality, it would really go a long
      way in helping me and would be hugely appreciated.

      thanks again,
      lorn
    • Ron Thompson
      I read the book Tabletop Machining by checking it out of the library. I had to as for an inter-library loan, but I got it. I was glad I hadn t paid $40 for
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 1, 2004
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        I read the book "Tabletop Machining" by checking it out of the library. I had to as for an inter-library loan, but I got it.
        I was glad I hadn't paid $40 for it! In my opinion, it is a glorified user manual for Sherline products. It might be useful for a first timer, but not for anyone who has read Sherline's website and links.
         
        If you haven't bought your machine yet, be sure to look at Taig. My friend has a Taig CNC. It is a much more robust machine and has more travel than my Sherline.
         
        Don't forget tooling. It's common to spend as much on tooling as you spend on the machine. It won't do much without it.

        Ron Thompson
        Was On the Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast,
        Now On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA
         
         
        The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is
        to fill the world with fools.
        --Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: efoda5446
        Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 12:33 AM
        Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Is this possible???

        hey allan, thanks for responding.

        yes, it's a shallow box with components inside.

        you mention the throat being an issue, what exactly is that, the
        spindle? i've been looking at diagrams of the 5400, but it doesn't
        specifically label "throat" as a part. basically your saying that the
        spindle needs to come out a bit to get around the edges of the box on
        the y axis, no? i think the 5400 comes with part no. 1297 which is the
        mill riser block, so i think i'm ok there. do you think the 5400 would
        have a problem with that alluminum cartridge thingy on the bottom?

        what mill sizes do you think would work, or rather, how does one just
        starting out figure out which mills/sizes to use? besides just asking
        people here would the "tabletop machining" book be a good resource for
        that?

        ok, sorry about all the q's. i just want to say thanks to everone for
        this board, it's really informative. i enjoy reading over your old
        posts. thanks. so far i think i'm swinging for the 5400 with mounts,
        then getting some 140 oz. steppers with the xylotex drivers and vector
        software. if anyone could recommend some additional tools/mills that i
        would need to try make this box a reality, it would really go a long
        way in helping me and would be hugely appreciated.

        thanks again,
        lorn

      • Alan Marconett KM6VV
        HI Lorn, The throat is the accommodation in the Y direction. How big a part you can access in Y. X is not usually too much of a problem. Don t know what you
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 1, 2004
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          HI Lorn,

          The throat is the accommodation in the Y direction. How big a part you
          can access in Y. X is not usually too much of a problem.

          Don't know what you mean by the "cartridge" on the bottom, looks like
          you want a shelf?

          Get a set of two-flue endmills from Sherline, that should get you
          started. You'll also want the ball endmills, 1/8" an 1/4" might be a
          start. Check MSC, or any of the tool flyers. The sizes you use are
          determined by the smallest inside arc you intend to cut, and by the
          depth needed.

          Sounds like you've picked the hardware and software, don't forget
          TurboCNC (or Mach1, CNCpro, etc.) for a controller program. A 200+ PC
          running DOS (boot disk is OK) will cover the computer.

          You'll want an edge finder, and possibly a DTI. Endmill holders for the
          3/8" shank endmills I mentioned. Small chuck and drill bits. Stepped
          hold down clamps.

          Alan KM6VV


          efoda5446 wrote:
          >
          > hey allan, thanks for responding.
          >
          > yes, it's a shallow box with components inside.
          >
          > you mention the throat being an issue, what exactly is that, the
          > spindle? i've been looking at diagrams of the 5400, but it doesn't
          > specifically label "throat" as a part. basically your saying that the
          > spindle needs to come out a bit to get around the edges of the box on
          > the y axis, no? i think the 5400 comes with part no. 1297 which is the
          > mill riser block, so i think i'm ok there. do you think the 5400 would
          > have a problem with that alluminum cartridge thingy on the bottom?
          >
          > what mill sizes do you think would work, or rather, how does one just
          > starting out figure out which mills/sizes to use? besides just asking
          > people here would the "tabletop machining" book be a good resource for
          > that?
          >
          > ok, sorry about all the q's. i just want to say thanks to everone for
          > this board, it's really informative. i enjoy reading over your old
          > posts. thanks. so far i think i'm swinging for the 5400 with mounts,
          > then getting some 140 oz. steppers with the xylotex drivers and vector
          > software. if anyone could recommend some additional tools/mills that i
          > would need to try make this box a reality, it would really go a long
          > way in helping me and would be hugely appreciated.
          >
          > thanks again,
          > lorn
          >
        • Tom Hubin
          Hello Lorn, You can probably make the part on a 5400 mill but it will require multiple setups. I have a CNC 5410 with the throat extension. That is the metric
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 1, 2004
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            Hello Lorn,

            You can probably make the part on a 5400 mill but it will require
            multiple setups.

            I have a CNC 5410 with the throat extension. That is the metric version
            of the 5400. I expect that the limits are the same for both the 5400 and
            the 5410.

            My bed is 13 inches by 3 inches with 8 inches of travel in the x
            direction.

            The extended throat depth (y) is 4 inches if the stock is no higher (z)
            than 0.8 inches or so. That means you can drill a hole 4 inches from the
            rear edge of the stock. If you need to drill or machine farther than 4
            inches from the back edge of the part then you will have to turn the
            part around so the machined area is within 4 inches of back edge of the
            part. This way you can machine parts that are up to 8 inches in the y
            direction.

            If the part stands taller than 0.8 inches or so it will not pass under
            the Z column. The throat depth for parts taller than 0.8 inches will
            only be 3.25 inches. Flipping it around for two passes allows up to 7
            inches in y. This is probably what you will have to do.

            The part can extend far out to the left (-x) since there are no
            obstructions. To the right (+x) and forward (-y) you are limited by the
            stepper motors which extend almost 3/8 inch above the bed plane. If the
            bottom of the part is 3/8 inch above the bed plane then you can extend
            right (+x) and forward (-y) far past the stepper motors.

            I have made large precision pieces on my mill. I first make a fixture
            plate with 0.2505 inch diameter reamed holes spaced 8.0 x 1.5 inches.
            This allows me to orient the fixture plate on the mill bed with 0.25
            inch dowel pins. This is precise enough for most things I do. I also
            ream a grid of 0.1255 inch holes in the fixture plate to mate with my
            part to be machined.

            In order to reference repeatably I usually make a standard. This can be
            a 2 inch square that mates with some 1/8 inch reamed holes in the
            fixture. An edge finder can then be used to reference to the edges of
            the standard.

            It may be sufficiently accurate to use a gauge block or a straight edge
            stretched between any of the dowel pins. Then find the edge of that for
            reference.

            You can also mill a rectangular hole or pocket in the fixture. An edge
            finder can then be used to reference to the edges of the rectangular
            hole.

            I also drill some #10 clearance holes in the fixture to secure it to the
            bed. These are sometimes farther apart than 8 inches so as to be out of
            the way of my machining. These need not be precisely located so I
            sometimes just mark and drill manually. I countersink the #10 clearance
            holes if necessary.

            I ream a grid of 0.1255 holes on my part so I can remove, inspect, and
            replace it very repeatably on the fixture plate. That includes
            translating to a new position or rotating or flipping it over.

            I sometimes drill and tap holes in the fixture, and clearance holes in
            the part, and secure the part to the fixture with screws. I sometimes
            just clamp the part on the ends with Sherline's stepped clamps. I have
            used C clamps in a pinch but these usually limit travel severely.

            I have made enough large parts and enough precision parts in my modest
            two years of machining that I now assume that I will design and make a
            fixture for just about anything that won't fit in the vise.

            Tom Hubin
            thubin@...

            **********************

            efoda5446 wrote:
            >
            > hi guys, i'm new to the group and am looking to get your opinions
            > advice on if a particular design would be possible with sherline
            > mills. the design can be found here:
            >
            > http://www.geocities.com/efoda5446/boxsketches.html
            >
            > the top four images show the top of a wooden box with components
            > inside (ignore components, fan, etc.) the top right image is an
            > alluminum plate that covers components. the bottom images are of the
            > bottom of the box with a circular alluminum cartridge inside. as you
            > can see the box has rounded curves and contours, dimensions approx
            > 5x7x4, materials wood/aluminum.
            >
            > is this doable with a sherline cnc? which model or special tooling
            > would be needed? i was thinking a 5400 with some ball ends for the
            > box... but i really don't know. i'm new at this but i'm not afraid to
            > dive in head on and give it a go. any input would be hugely
            > appreciated.
            >
            > thanks,
            > lorn
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Larry Goldberg
            Hello Lorn, You can check www.desktopcnc.com for a comparison of tabletop CNC systems. The Sherline tools excel at components within their size capability,
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 3, 2004
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              Hello Lorn,

              You can check www.desktopcnc.com for a comparison of tabletop CNC
              systems. The Sherline tools excel at components within their size
              capability, and creative fixturing can produce remarkable results.
              Look around and decide what's best for you.

              Larry

              > hey allan, thanks for responding.
              >
              > yes, it's a shallow box with components inside.
              >
              > you mention the throat being an issue, what exactly is that, the
              > spindle? i've been looking at diagrams of the 5400, but it doesn't
              > specifically label "throat" as a part. basically your saying that
              the
              > spindle needs to come out a bit to get around the edges of the box
              on
              > the y axis, no? i think the 5400 comes with part no. 1297 which is
              the
              > mill riser block, so i think i'm ok there. do you think the 5400
              would
              > have a problem with that alluminum cartridge thingy on the bottom?
              >
              > what mill sizes do you think would work, or rather, how does one
              just
              > starting out figure out which mills/sizes to use? besides just
              asking
              > people here would the "tabletop machining" book be a good resource
              for
              > that?
              >
              > ok, sorry about all the q's. i just want to say thanks to everone
              for
              > this board, it's really informative. i enjoy reading over your old
              > posts. thanks. so far i think i'm swinging for the 5400 with
              mounts,
              > then getting some 140 oz. steppers with the xylotex drivers and
              vector
              > software. if anyone could recommend some additional tools/mills
              that i
              > would need to try make this box a reality, it would really go a
              long
              > way in helping me and would be hugely appreciated.
              >
              > thanks again,
              > lorn
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