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Re: [SherlineCNC] emc.ini example

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  • Mike Joyce
    http://emc.obstinate.org The Sherline mod tarball has our ini s if you would like to use them as a comparison -- Mike Joyce Sr. Network Administrator Sherline
    Message 1 of 85 , Nov 4, 2003
      http://emc.obstinate.org

      The Sherline mod tarball has our ini's if you would like to use them as a
      comparison

      --
      Mike Joyce
      Sr. Network Administrator
      Sherline Products
      mike@...


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Geert De Pecker" <geert.de.pecker@...>
      To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 12:40 PM
      Subject: [SherlineCNC] emc.ini example


      > Hi,
      >
      > I installed the latest emc and have to start using freqmod (used
      > steppermod before). It would be nice if I could start with an example.
      > If have a sherline 2000 with pacsci motors for X and Y, and a heavier
      > sanyo-denki for Z. All controlled by xylotex.
      >
      > Anybody wanting to share his emc.ini file?
      >
      > Thx,
      >
      > Geert
      >
      >
      >
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      > SherlineCNC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      >
    • Fred Smith
      ... stepper ... its zero ... steps. Returning to zero is not the same as homing. Homing is usually defined as moving to a location that is repeatable with
      Message 85 of 85 , Nov 8, 2003
        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Carol & Jerry Jankura"
        <jerry.jankura@s...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Or the lesson could be that you can never be certain that a
        stepper
        > > has not lost steps until you re-home the machine after running a
        > > program, and then only if you have a 1 step threshold (or less)
        > > homing routine (like with an optical switch, ... or an encoder).
        >
        > Actually, you don't want to rehome the systen, You should "zero" the
        > location after homing. Then run your part and move the system to
        its zero
        > location, which should be the same as home if you haven't lost any
        steps.

        Returning to zero is not the same as homing. Homing is usually
        defined as moving to a location that is repeatable with respect to
        the mechanical machine and zeroing the machine coordinate system. It
        is usually a required first step on a commercial controller after
        turning on the power.

        For a stepper system, you need to hit the switch and visually check
        the readout, without re-zeroing to verify that your zero is still the
        same. Any difference from zero at home position is the lost steps
        (or backlash).

        Re-home is not really the correct word for what I was describing. A
        better term would be "step loss check".

        For efficiency a "step loss check" sensor could be located in middle
        of the travel, rather than on the ends. It's more difficult to
        protect it, the closer it gets to the cutting action

        Fred Smith - IMService
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