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Re: [SherlineCNC] TinyG CNC Hardware Project

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  • Andy M
    GDay Martin, Thanks Martin. I have seen reference to BeagleBone but had no idea what it was about. I ll have to take a closer look now. Exciting times we live
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 6, 2013
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      GDay Martin,

      Thanks Martin. I have seen reference to BeagleBone but had no idea what
      it was about. I'll have to take a closer look now.

      Exciting times we live in right now :)

      --
      Regards
      Andy M



      Martin Dobbins wrote:
      > Hi Andy,
      >
      > That's a very interesting project and reminded me of another that I have
      > been following. This is running on a 3D printer with X, Y , 2 times Z,
      > plus pwm tasks and still has overhead. I don't know if anyone has tried
      > the BeagleBone running a 3 or 4 axis milling machine yet.
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2IoHOZipLU
      >
      > Martin
    • Martin Dobbins
      Hi Andy, Indeed we do, I like the idea of these and the TinyG you referenced (there are others) because they can offload repetitive CNC tasks from the main
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 6, 2013
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        Hi Andy,

        Indeed we do, I like the idea of these and the TinyG you referenced (there are others) because they can offload repetitive CNC tasks from the main processor of a CNC PC and just leave that to provide the GUI and backplot.  You don't even need the PC if you can do without those two things (!)  Items like the SmoothStepper can certainly do this too, but where these platforms shine is the ability to have I/O which I'm not sure the SmoothStepper does (I'm ready to be corrected by those who know more about the product!).  If I wanted to measure spindle speed and also control the spindle motor so that I can run a comparitive loop to establish a spindle speed, I'm pretty sure I could do it on these platforms, I don't know that it could be done with SmoothStepper.

        Martin





        ________________________________
        From: Andy M
        To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2013 1:36 PM
        Subject: Re: [SherlineCNC] TinyG CNC Hardware Project



         
        GDay Martin,

        Thanks Martin. I have seen reference to BeagleBone but had no idea what
        it was about. I'll have to take a closer look now.

        Exciting times we live in right now :)

        --
        Regards
        Andy M

        Martin Dobbins wrote:
        > Hi Andy,
        >
        > That's a very interesting project and reminded me of another that I have
        > been following. This is running on a 3D printer with X, Y , 2 times Z,
        > plus pwm tasks and still has overhead. I don't know if anyone has tried
        > the BeagleBone running a 3 or 4 axis milling machine yet.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2IoHOZipLU
        >
        > Martin



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Andy M
        GDay Martin, The Smooth Stepper can handle both I/O and PWM motor control. It is basically a USB or Ethernet front end that connects to a traditional parallel
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 6, 2013
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          GDay Martin,

          The Smooth Stepper can handle both I/O and PWM motor control. It is
          basically a USB or Ethernet front end that connects to a traditional
          parallel port breakout board and then to the stepper drivers.

          And you are able to connect more than one parallel port breakout Board
          to them giving you as many I/O lines as you need.

          I had a quick look at the BeagleBone. It's much like an Arduino and has
          it's own 'Shields' and such. It seems to be fairly powerful since it's
          using an ARM processor.

          Might be worth investigating further ;)

          The TinyG seems to be a good compact controller though and it is
          amazingly cheap compared to say a Gecko 540. Not that the Gecko is all
          that expensive.

          The TinyG also seems to have some very good features like PWM spindle
          control, relay control, USB hookup and so on. And with 6 axis
          capability, that has got to be a bonus as well, especially for anyone
          building a 3D printer with a multi-stepper axis.

          Now all I need is some $$$$ ;(

          --
          Regards
          Andy M



          Martin Dobbins wrote:
          > Hi Andy,
          >
          > Indeed we do, I like the idea of these and the TinyG you referenced
          > (there are others) because they can offload repetitive CNC tasks from
          > the main processor of a CNC PC and just leave that to provide the GUI
          > and backplot. You don't even need the PC if you can do without those
          > two things (!) Items like the SmoothStepper can certainly do this too,
          > but where these platforms shine is the ability to have I/O which I'm not
          > sure the SmoothStepper does (I'm ready to be corrected by those who know
          > more about the product!). If I wanted to measure spindle speed and also
          > control the spindle motor so that I can run a comparitive loop to
          > establish a spindle speed, I'm pretty sure I could do it on these
          > platforms, I don't know that it could be done with SmoothStepper.
          >
          > Martin
        • Peter Homann
          ... M3,M4,M5 control discrete outputs for turning on and off the spindle. For spindle speed control it needs to support the S word. Cheers, Peter -- ...
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 6, 2013
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            On 7/07/2013 4:34 AM, Andy M wrote:
            > GDay Shannon,
            >
            > On the TinyG wiki, they report having support for M3, M4, and M5 so I am
            > assuming that means it has some type spindle control and is probably
            > using PWM.

            M3,M4,M5 control discrete outputs for turning on and off the spindle. For
            spindle speed control it needs to support the S word.

            Cheers,

            Peter

            --
            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
            eStore: http://www.homanndesigns.com/store
            Web : http://www.homanndesigns.com ModIO - Modbus Interface Unit
            email : peter@... DigiSpeed - Isolated 10Vdc I/F
            Phone : +61 421 601 665 TurboTaig - Taig Mill Upgrade board
          • Ron Ginger
            ... Smoothstepper supports lots of I/O. The USB version has 2 parallel ports output, the ESS has 3. These support encoders for either MPGs (manual Pulse
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 7, 2013
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              > Indeed we do, I like the idea of these and the TinyG you referenced (there are others) because they can offload repetitive CNC tasks from the main processor of a CNC PC and just leave that to provide the GUI and backplot. You don't even need the PC if you can do without those two things (!) Items like the SmoothStepper can certainly do this too, but where these platforms shine is the ability to have I/O which I'm not sure the SmoothStepper does (I'm ready to be corrected by those who know more about the product!). If I wanted to measure spindle speed and also control the spindle motor so that I can run a comparitive loop to establish a spindle speed, I'm pretty sure I could do it on these platforms, I don't know that it could be done with SmoothStepper.
              >
              > Martin

              Smoothstepper supports lots of I/O. The USB version has 2 parallel ports
              output, the ESS has 3. These support encoders for either MPGs (manual
              Pulse Generators) or feedback encoders from motors. They can be
              configured in Mach for any input or output you could do on a parallel port.

              ron ginger
            • Jeffrey Birt
              On the subject in general of TinyG and its variants. For many applications something like this would be ideal. It is the type of thing being used on the lower
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 7, 2013
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                On the subject in general of TinyG and its variants. For many applications
                something like this would be ideal. It is the type of thing being used on
                the lower end 3D printers. For use with machine tools I've had a few
                customers start out that way and then move to Mach3/SmoothStepper to get
                past the performance limitations. Almost any embedded system like this will
                have issues with block speed (how fast it can process each line of code),
                that is just due to the limited processor speed and resources. Again, for
                many applications it would be a great way to go. If you want a GUI, full
                Fanuc style GCode support then you are back to Mach3 and EMC2. A cheap Intel
                Atom PC motherboard ($100) and SmoothStepper ($200) makes a mean little
                combination. I use a 15" Asus all-in-one touch screen PC in the shop, it was
                less than $400 and works great.

                Moving the motion control tasks to hardware designed for that task is the
                way to go, IMHO. In the case of the something like TinyG you get around
                needing a PC. IN the case of a PC/Mach3/SmoothStepper you completely blow
                away the limitations of the parallel port.

                Each solution has its place. As the price of dedicated motion hardware falls
                we will see the parallel port fade into history.

                Jeff Birt
                Soigeneirs.com

                -----Original Message-----
                From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Andy M
                Sent: Saturday, July 06, 2013 7:17 PM
                To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SherlineCNC] TinyG CNC Hardware Project

                GDay Martin,

                The Smooth Stepper can handle both I/O and PWM motor control. It is
                basically a USB or Ethernet front end that connects to a traditional
                parallel port breakout board and then to the stepper drivers.

                And you are able to connect more than one parallel port breakout Board to
                them giving you as many I/O lines as you need.

                I had a quick look at the BeagleBone. It's much like an Arduino and has it's
                own 'Shields' and such. It seems to be fairly powerful since it's using an
                ARM processor.

                Might be worth investigating further ;)

                The TinyG seems to be a good compact controller though and it is amazingly
                cheap compared to say a Gecko 540. Not that the Gecko is all that expensive.

                The TinyG also seems to have some very good features like PWM spindle
                control, relay control, USB hookup and so on. And with 6 axis capability,
                that has got to be a bonus as well, especially for anyone building a 3D
                printer with a multi-stepper axis.

                Now all I need is some $$$$ ;(

                --
                Regards
                Andy M



                Martin Dobbins wrote:
                > Hi Andy,
                >
                > Indeed we do, I like the idea of these and the TinyG you referenced
                > (there are others) because they can offload repetitive CNC tasks from
                > the main processor of a CNC PC and just leave that to provide the GUI
                > and backplot. You don't even need the PC if you can do without those
                > two things (!) Items like the SmoothStepper can certainly do this
                > too, but where these platforms shine is the ability to have I/O which
                > I'm not sure the SmoothStepper does (I'm ready to be corrected by
                > those who know more about the product!). If I wanted to measure
                > spindle speed and also control the spindle motor so that I can run a
                > comparitive loop to establish a spindle speed, I'm pretty sure I could
                > do it on these platforms, I don't know that it could be done with
                SmoothStepper.
                >
                > Martin


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