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EMC2 4th Axis

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  • jose ruiz
    Hello, newbe here. I recently purchased a the Sherline CNC rotary table and I am having a difficult time calibrating it in MC2. I have messed with the
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2012
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      Hello,

      newbe here. I recently purchased a the Sherline CNC rotary table and I am
      having a difficult time calibrating it in MC2. I have messed with the
      settings in the .ini file but just cant seem to get it to run correctly.
      It seems to skip some steps. I start the test at 0degrees and the index
      wheel at "0" and then run it out to 180degrees, the index wheel always
      stops two notches short of the "0" mark. Also, the motor seems to run
      hotter than the other ones on the other axis.

      Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dave Hylands
      Hi Jose, ... One thing that messed me up for a while is that the rotary table has a setscrew used for locking the table. Make sure it s loose. Also double
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3, 2012
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        Hi Jose,

        On Sun, Apr 1, 2012 at 7:56 AM, jose ruiz <joseruiz0713@...> wrote:
        > Hello,
        >
        > newbe here.  I recently purchased a the Sherline CNC rotary table and I am
        > having a difficult time calibrating it in MC2.  I have messed with the
        > settings in the .ini file but just cant seem to get it to run correctly.
        > It seems to skip some steps.  I start the test at 0degrees and the index
        > wheel at "0" and then run it out to 180degrees, the index wheel always
        > stops two notches short of the "0" mark.  Also, the motor seems to run
        > hotter than the other ones on the other axis.

        One thing that messed me up for a while is that the rotary table has a
        setscrew used for locking the table. Make sure it's loose.

        Also double check your math (this also messed me up for a while).
        It takes 72 revolutions of the stepper to go 360 degrees.
        Or 72 x 200 = 14,400 full steps to go 360 degrees
        Or 14400/360 = 40 full steps per degree

        If you have 1/8 steps for microstepping then that's 40 * 8 = 320
        microsteps per degree. I set my rotary table up so that one unit in
        gcode corresponded to one degree.

        The temperature of the motor will largely be related to the current
        running through it, so check your current setting for that particular
        axis.

        --
        Dave Hylands
        Shuswap, BC, Canada
        http://www.davehylands.com
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