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Re: [SherlineCNC] 1-2-3 Block Question

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  • Marty Escarcega
    Dont try and tap them. 123 blocks are handy for all sorts of things, bolt them together make an angle plate. Use them as parallels to fixture a part. Look up
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 14, 2012
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      Dont try and tap them. 123 blocks are handy for all sorts of things, bolt
      them together make an angle plate. Use them as parallels to fixture a part.
      Look up 123 block uses on google. Look at images for ideas.
      On Mar 14, 2012 1:56 PM, "Thomas D. Dean" <tomdean@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > I would like to ask this question on the sherline group, but, the
      > moderator cannot spare the time to approve the message.
      >
      > I have a new set (new to me) of 1-2-3 blocks.
      >
      > Brown and Sharpe 599-750-10, .0001 squareness on all sides.
      >
      > The blocks have 3x5 holes on the two large surfaces.
      >
      > n t n t n
      > n n t n n
      > n t n t n
      >
      > n=not tapped t=tapped 3/8-16.
      >
      > The holes on the other 4 surfaces are not tapped.
      >
      > Is this normal?
      >
      > What is the purpose of the non-tapped holes? These are
      > 'Oversized to allow for normal tapping .0001" - .0003"'
      >
      > Since the blocks are case hardened on all 6 surfaces, is it possible to
      > tap the holes?
      >
      > Tom Dean
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Thomas D. Dean
      ... I tried google first, too many hits. Saw them used to raise something above the table and to tram a mill. How do I use them to make an angle block other
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 14, 2012
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        On 03/14/12 14:44, Marty Escarcega wrote:
        > Dont try and tap them. 123 blocks are handy for all sorts of things, bolt
        > them together make an angle plate. Use them as parallels to fixture a part.
        > Look up 123 block uses on google. Look at images for ideas.

        I tried google first, too many hits.

        Saw them used to raise something above the table and to tram a mill.

        How do I use them to make an angle block other than 90 degrees?

        Tom Dean
      • Marty Escarcega
        Eh, 123 blocks are used for setups. 90 degrees is what you get. An angle plate of sorts. Not any other angle. You ll break a tap if you try and tap the holes.
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 14, 2012
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          Eh, 123 blocks are used for setups. 90 degrees is what you get. An angle
          plate of sorts. Not any other angle. You'll break a tap if you try and tap
          the holes.
          Take the time to study some of the Google pictures. They'll give you many
          ideas.

          On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 3:49 PM, Thomas D. Dean <tomdean@...>wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > On 03/14/12 14:44, Marty Escarcega wrote:
          > > Dont try and tap them. 123 blocks are handy for all sorts of things, bolt
          > > them together make an angle plate. Use them as parallels to fixture a
          > part.
          > > Look up 123 block uses on google. Look at images for ideas.
          >
          > I tried google first, too many hits.
          >
          > Saw them used to raise something above the table and to tram a mill.
          >
          > How do I use them to make an angle block other than 90 degrees?
          >
          > Tom Dean
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tom Wade
          You don t. If you want to set a random angle, you need a sine plate or a sine bar. Here s an example of a sine Plate:
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 15, 2012
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            You don't.

            If you want to set a random angle, you need a sine plate or a sine bar.
            Here's an example of a sine Plate:

            http://www.mcmaster.com/#sine-plates/=go4e9l

            There are many others.

            Here are some angle plates which can help with setups:

            http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=356&PARTPG=INLMK3&PMITEM=418-4810
            <http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=356&PARTPG=INLMK3&PMITEM=418-4810>

            Here are some angle plate sets:

            http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=355&PMCTLG=00
            <http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=355&PMCTLG=00>

            These can be stacked together to acheive any angle you need.

            Tom Wade


            On 3/14/2012 6:49 PM, Thomas D. Dean wrote:
            >
            > On 03/14/12 14:44, Marty Escarcega wrote:
            > > Dont try and tap them. 123 blocks are handy for all sorts of things,
            > bolt
            > > them together make an angle plate. Use them as parallels to fixture
            > a part.
            > > Look up 123 block uses on google. Look at images for ideas.
            >
            > I tried google first, too many hits.
            >
            > Saw them used to raise something above the table and to tram a mill.
            >
            > How do I use them to make an angle block other than 90 degrees?
            >
            > Tom Dean
            >
            >
          • Thomas D. Dean
            Is this too far off topic for this group? I could not get moderator approval on the non-CNC group and gave up. I am inexperienced. I have a 2000 mill and 4400
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 19, 2012
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              Is this too far off topic for this group? I could not get moderator
              approval on the non-CNC group and gave up.

              I am inexperienced.

              I have a 2000 mill and 4400 lathe, both with DRO

              I decided to stay manual for now.

              I have QCAD on a BSD machine. It is 2D. I am inexperienced with this,
              too. But, my last thingee was difficult due to my messy sketches.

              Is 2D sufficient for manual operation of a mill, assuming I make at
              least two views? 2D is all that is needed for the lathe, I believe.
              correct?

              Tom Dean
            • Tom Wade
              This is one of those questions that s almost impossible to answer. First, let me say that 2D is probably sufficient. But the real answer is that it really is
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 19, 2012
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                This is one of those questions that's almost impossible to answer.

                First, let me say that 2D is probably sufficient.

                But the real answer is that it really is determined by what kind of
                parts you're trying to make.

                Generally speaking, it's hard to make complex 3d parts on a manual
                machine. But not impossible.

                But you have the model 2000 mill, which has incredible flexibility in
                cutting odd shapes and angles. So you do have the capability of cutting
                some very different shapes, when the need arises.

                The price you pay is that you are going to have to take less aggressive
                cuts, as your machine is much more flexible than some more simple
                machines. You're also going to spend more time tramming.

                On my model 5400 I can probably still produce almost any part which you
                can produce, but I'll have to do some more creative thinking to rotate
                the part, and hold it steady.

                I make many of my parts from sketches, and don't even worry about the
                dimensions. But other parts demand a drawing. A good example are the
                spoked wheels for a cannon. When you buy the rotatry table from
                Sherline, the instructions include a piece on making spoked wheels.
                These spoked wheels would be difficult for most people to cut without a
                proper drawing. But there probably are guys with an excellent grasp of
                geometry who could cut them all day long without drawings.

                The simple answer is this: Start with a 2D cad program. Almost any
                package you can buy will let you upgrade to 3D for a somewhat reasonable
                price. When you find you've GOT to have 3D, then save your pennies and
                upgrade.

                Tom Wade


                On 3/19/2012 8:05 AM, Thomas D. Dean wrote:
                > Is this too far off topic for this group? I could not get moderator
                > approval on the non-CNC group and gave up.
                >
                > I am inexperienced.
                >
                > I have a 2000 mill and 4400 lathe, both with DRO
                >
                > I decided to stay manual for now.
                >
                > I have QCAD on a BSD machine. It is 2D. I am inexperienced with this,
                > too. But, my last thingee was difficult due to my messy sketches.
                >
                > Is 2D sufficient for manual operation of a mill, assuming I make at
                > least two views? 2D is all that is needed for the lathe, I believe.
                > correct?
                >
                > Tom Dean
                >
                >
              • Scott Meyer
                2d is probably all that would be practical for any manual machine. If all your doing is essentially cutting straight lines and arcs, what couldn t you draft in
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 19, 2012
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                  2d is probably all that would be practical for any manual machine. If
                  all your doing is essentially cutting straight lines and arcs, what
                  couldn't you draft in a 2d only program?

                  You won't be cutting lines where you need a french curve to draw them,
                  but you wouldn't be cutting them on a manual machine without a scribed
                  line anyway.

                  I cut some complex parts at work, including ones that hold curved/bent
                  tubes and everything it detailed out in a 2d blueprint, except for the
                  actual surface that holds the tube.

                  What is going to be next to the machine when you are cutting? Are you
                  going to have a PC there that you refer to a 3d design on? Or are you
                  going to print out a blueprint for machine side reference?

                  Between top, front, side and a couple section views, you can get pretty
                  complex parts illustrated. From your question, I suspect more complex
                  than you are capable of producing at your experience level.

                  Scott Meyer
                  http://www.onlyonecreations.com


                  On 3/19/2012 8:05 AM, Thomas D. Dean wrote:
                  > Is this too far off topic for this group? I could not get moderator
                  > approval on the non-CNC group and gave up.
                  >
                  > I am inexperienced.
                  >
                  > I have a 2000 mill and 4400 lathe, both with DRO
                  >
                  > I decided to stay manual for now.
                  >
                  > I have QCAD on a BSD machine. It is 2D. I am inexperienced with this,
                  > too. But, my last thingee was difficult due to my messy sketches.
                  >
                  > Is 2D sufficient for manual operation of a mill, assuming I make at
                  > least two views? 2D is all that is needed for the lathe, I believe.
                  > correct?
                  >
                  > Tom Dean
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • kungfumachinist
                  ... Up till recently I did all my work on a manual 5000 mill with QCAD and the DRO. The purpose of the drawing is two-fold: first it s a tool to design the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 20, 2012
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                    --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas D. Dean" <tomdean@...> wrote:
                    > I decided to stay manual for now.
                    >
                    > I have QCAD on a BSD machine.

                    > Is 2D sufficient for manual operation of a mill, assuming I make at
                    > least two views?

                    Up till recently I did all my work on a manual 5000 mill with QCAD and the DRO. The purpose of the drawing is two-fold: first it's a tool to design the part. You have to make decisions about what it looks like, where the holes are, etc., and you want to do this accurately. Second, the drawing produces accurate dimensions.

                    What I do, for a 2D part for example, is draw the outline of the part to be cut out, then place circles around the drawing that are the same size as my cutter. The cutter circles were strategically placed to indicate the finish position of various operations. (E.g. one circle is at the outside of a corner of a square such that it lines up with both edges of the square. I suppose a picture might be good...)

                    Then I would pick a reference point and do all X and Y dimensions from the reference point to the center of the cutter circles. Then I position the spindle over the reference point, zero the DRO and use the dimensions to tell me when I've reached the right position.

                    2D is definitely good enough for the second part, getting accurate dimensions. The question for you is, is 2D good enough for you to design in?

                    /Daryl
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