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RE: [SherlineCNC] Re: Right angle attachment: do you buy or make?

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  • Alan
    Hi Dave, The hardboard sounds like it would work just fine. I ve also found MDF useful. For milling PCBs, I have a hardwood piece with countersunk holes to
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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      Hi Dave,

      The hardboard sounds like it would work just fine. I've also found MDF
      useful.

      For milling PCBs, I have a hardwood piece with countersunk holes to take
      10-32 hold-downs. Then I take a light pass across it with a fly cutter or
      end mill. A few extra clearance holes to match my PCB design complete the
      fixture.

      Stepped-clamping blocks and the tooling plate are my main hold-down system,
      I can't remember when I last used the vise.

      Alan KM6VV

      > -----Original Message-----
      > [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave Hylands
      >
      > Hi Alan,
      >
      > Yeah - I'm talking about sacrificial plates. I don't "machine" them per
      say.
      >
      > When I do make full size ones, I cut the larger sheets to size on my
      > table saw and use a drill press to put clearance holes (no threading).
      >
      > However, typically, I just keep a box of scraps and just find a scrap
      > piece that's about the right size, and drill whatever holes I actually
      > need rather than drilling all possible holes.
      >
      > Many times I don't need any holes.
      >
      > The tempered hardboard is also really easy to cut with a handsaw.
      >
      > The thickness of a given piece of hardboard is pretty uniform. I just
      > measured a few 1/4" pieces and they were all 0.241 to 0.242 over 8".
      >
      > --
      > Dave Hylands
      > Shuswap, BC, Canada
      > http://www.davehylands.com
      >
      >
    • ttyfat
      So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle attachment also? Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z sells them
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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        So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle attachment also?

        Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z sells them cheaper than the sherline one. Ive also seen some cheapo version from somewhere I cant remember but it was essentially just a flat plate with a few holes tapped into it so you can bolt it down from the bottom and have the rotary table essentially just sit on the plate cause its bottom is flat, and not have the vertical structure to provide additional rigidity.

        So which is the best way? Did you make your own, if so how does it look?

        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Dave Hylands <dhylands@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Alan,
        >
        > On Fri, Nov 4, 2011 at 11:33 AM, Alan <KM6VV@...> wrote:
        > > Sure you aren't talking about sacrificial stock?  I use 1/4" paneling for
        > > that job.
        >
        > Yeah - I'm talking about sacrificial plates. I don't "machine" them per say.
        >
        > When I do make full size ones, I cut the larger sheets to size on my
        > table saw and use a drill press to put clearance holes (no threading).
        >
        > However, typically, I just keep a box of scraps and just find a scrap
        > piece that's about the right size, and drill whatever holes I actually
        > need rather than drilling all possible holes.
        >
        > Many times I don't need any holes.
        >
        > The tempered hardboard is also really easy to cut with a handsaw.
        >
        > The thickness of a given piece of hardboard is pretty uniform. I just
        > measured a few 1/4" pieces and they were all 0.241 to 0.242 over 8".
        >
        > --
        > Dave Hylands
        > Shuswap, BC, Canada
        > http://www.davehylands.com
        >
      • Ron Thompson
        ... I use the Sherline one on my Taig CNC. It is a good investment. Ask yourself, do you need it right now to do something with, or are you just wanting it
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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          On 11/4/2011 3:28 PM, ttyfat wrote:
          >
          > So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle
          > attachment also?
          >
          > Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z sells
          > them cheaper than the sherline one. Ive also seen some cheapo version
          > from somewhere I cant remember but it was essentially just a flat
          > plate with a few holes tapped into it so you can bolt it down from the
          > bottom and have the rotary table essentially just sit on the plate
          > cause its bottom is flat, and not have the vertical structure to
          > provide additional rigidity.
          >
          > So which is the best way? Did you make your own, if so how does it look?
          >
          I use the Sherline one on my Taig CNC. It is a good investment.
          Ask yourself, do you need it right now to do something with, or are you
          just wanting it because it's cool?

          --


          Ron Thompson
          On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

          Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/Prusa_Mendel1/

          http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
          http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

          Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
          http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dave Hylands
          Hi, ... I went with the A2Z one. http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/Modifications/Tooling-Plate/ The disadvantage of the A2Z one and the flat plate ones is
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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            Hi,

            On Fri, Nov 4, 2011 at 12:28 PM, ttyfat <ttyfat@...> wrote:
            > So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle attachment also?
            >
            > Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z sells them cheaper than the sherline one. Ive also seen some cheapo version from somewhere I cant remember but it was essentially just a flat plate with a few holes tapped into it so you can bolt it down from the bottom and have the rotary table essentially just sit on the plate cause its bottom is flat, and not have the vertical structure to provide additional rigidity.
            >
            > So which is the best way? Did you make your own, if so how does it look?

            I went with the A2Z one.
            http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/Modifications/Tooling-Plate/

            The disadvantage of the A2Z one and the flat plate ones is that you
            don't get any real adjustability. I found that by controlling the
            tightness of the bolts that I could get my A2Z setup to be square.

            With the sherline mount, you get a direct ability to adjust the
            squareness of things.

            Going with the flat plate will be much easier to put the screws in
            that the A2Z one which has 4 standoffs. I had to use needle nose
            pliers to hold the standoffs since my fingers were too big...

            You can make your own flat plate pretty easy and try it out. Aluminum
            foil works pretty good as a shim if you need to tweak the squareness.

            Then if you're not happy with it, then you can decide if you want to
            buy the sherline one or not.

            --
            Dave Hylands
            Shuswap, BC, Canada
            http://www.davehylands.com
          • Ron Thompson
            ... Please disregard my answer. I thought you were talking about the 4th axis. -- Ron Thompson On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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              On 11/4/2011 4:11 PM, Dave Hylands wrote:
              >
              > Hi,
              >
              > On Fri, Nov 4, 2011 at 12:28 PM, ttyfat <ttyfat@...
              > <mailto:ttyfat%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
              > > So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle
              > attachment also?
              > >
              > > Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z
              > sells them cheaper than the sherline one. Ive also seen some cheapo
              > version from somewhere I cant remember but it was essentially just a
              > flat plate with a few holes tapped into it so you can bolt it down
              > from the bottom and have the rotary table essentially just sit on the
              > plate cause its bottom is flat, and not have the vertical structure to
              > provide additional rigidity.
              > >
              > > So which is the best way? Did you make your own, if so how does it look?
              >
              > I went with the A2Z one.
              > http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist/Modifications/Tooling-Plate/
              >
              > The disadvantage of the A2Z one and the flat plate ones is that you
              > don't get any real adjustability. I found that by controlling the
              > tightness of the bolts that I could get my A2Z setup to be square.
              >
              > With the sherline mount, you get a direct ability to adjust the
              > squareness of things.
              >
              > Going with the flat plate will be much easier to put the screws in
              > that the A2Z one which has 4 standoffs. I had to use needle nose
              > pliers to hold the standoffs since my fingers were too big...
              >
              > You can make your own flat plate pretty easy and try it out. Aluminum
              > foil works pretty good as a shim if you need to tweak the squareness.
              >
              > Then if you're not happy with it, then you can decide if you want to
              > buy the sherline one or not.
              >
              > --
              > Dave Hylands
              > Shuswap, BC, Canada
              > http://www.davehylands.com
              >
              Please disregard my answer. I thought you were talking about the 4th axis.

              --


              Ron Thompson
              On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

              Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

              http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/Prusa_Mendel1/

              http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
              http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

              Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
              http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/









              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Alan
              I just bought mine, both the fixed and adjustable. For a few small right angle jigs, I found a very heavy steel piece, an L-shaped bracket of some sort. I cut
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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                I just bought mine, both the fixed and adjustable.

                For a few small right angle jigs, I found a very heavy steel piece, an
                L-shaped bracket of some sort. I cut it up to give me 2" x 2" plates, with
                a very accurate angle. One could also clamp it to a 123-block, and face it
                off it needed. Works!

                Alan KM6VV

                > -----Original Message-----
                > [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ttyfat


                > So is the overall consensus to buy or make your own right angle attachment
                > also?
                >
                > Ive seen a youtube video of a guy making one himself. I know A2Z sells
                them
                > cheaper than the sherline one. Ive also seen some cheapo version from
                > somewhere I cant remember but it was essentially just a flat plate with a
                few
                > holes tapped into it so you can bolt it down from the bottom and have the
                > rotary table essentially just sit on the plate cause its bottom is flat,
                and not have
                > the vertical structure to provide additional rigidity.
                >
                > So which is the best way? Did you make your own, if so how does it look?
                >
              • Hal
                Buy the fixture for thr 4th axis. Cost vs. time/quality issues. The subplates are to be made as needed. Wood and plastic are great for cutting profiles and
                Message 7 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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                  Buy the fixture for thr 4th axis. Cost vs. time/quality issues.

                  The subplates are to be made as needed. Wood and plastic are great for cutting profiles and supporting the parts.The tighter the tolerance the better subplate is needed. Most "hobby" projects mdf and plastics will do. Countersink for flat head screws works for mounting. Counterbores are for thicker plates. Small subplates can be held in a vice.

                  Holes for part hold downs can be drilled through for T-nuts to support the threads. The metal plates can be tapped for the screws.

                  Key stock makes disposable paralles. Thickness is close enough for general uses.

                  A great use for a subplate is to mount your 4th axis and tailstock. I use this at my work all the time. ALine the plate and the 4th axis and tails stock are alined with each other. AtoZcnc has several plates for this.
                • Dave Hylands
                  Hi Ron, ... That s right, we were talking about the 4th axis... -- Dave Hylands Shuswap, BC, Canada http://www.davehylands.com
                  Message 8 of 19 , Nov 4, 2011
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                    Hi Ron,

                    > Please disregard my answer. I thought you were talking about the 4th axis.

                    That's right, we were talking about the 4th axis...

                    --
                    Dave Hylands
                    Shuswap, BC, Canada
                    http://www.davehylands.com
                  • Ron Thompson
                    ... Thanks, Dave, I guess I missed a turn somewhere... -- Ron Thompson On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA Think,
                    Message 9 of 19 , Nov 5, 2011
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                      On 11/4/2011 11:29 PM, Dave Hylands wrote:
                      > Hi Ron,
                      >
                      > > Please disregard my answer. I thought you were talking about the 4th
                      > axis.
                      >
                      > That's right, we were talking about the 4th axis...
                      >
                      > --
                      > Dave Hylands
                      Thanks, Dave, I guess I missed a turn somewhere...

                      --


                      Ron Thompson
                      On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

                      Think, Draw, Print. 3D printers ROCK!

                      http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/Prusa_Mendel1/

                      http://www.plansandprojects.com My hobby pages are here:
                      http://www.plansandprojects.com/My%20Machines/

                      Visit the castinghobby FAQ:
                      http://castinghobbyfaq.bareboogerhost.com/
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