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Finally got my 5400 cnc upgrade.

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  • botwire
    Hey guys, After a year of waiting, I got my CNC upgrade. All is working fine now but I do have a question. A few times now, the preload nut has come loose.
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 7, 2011
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      Hey guys,

      After a year of waiting, I got my CNC upgrade. All is working fine now but I do have a question. A few times now, the preload nut has come loose. First, how tight does it have to be? snug? Moderately tight or very tight? Should I use blue lock tite? A luck nut? What are you guys doing for your preload nuts?

      Any tips for this noob? :)

      Thanks!
    • a3sigma
      See: http://www.sherline.com/6700inst.htm Step 4 under INSTALLING THE STEPPER MOTOR MOUNT I use Loctite 290 for this sort of thing. It has good capillary
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 8, 2011
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        See: http://www.sherline.com/6700inst.htm

        Step 4 under "INSTALLING THE STEPPER MOTOR MOUNT"

        I use Loctite 290 for this sort of thing. It has good capillary action -- a drop on the screw next to the nut will wick into the threads. Threads must be clean and free of grease and oil.

        David Clark in Southern Maryland, USA

        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "botwire" <botwire@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey guys,
        >
        > After a year of waiting, I got my CNC upgrade. All is working fine now but I do have a question. A few times now, the preload nut has come loose. First, how tight does it have to be? snug? Moderately tight or very tight? Should I use blue lock tite? A luck nut? What are you guys doing for your preload nuts?
        >
        > Any tips for this noob? :)
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
      • botwire
        I should have read more carefully the instructions before installing the upgrade. It says to use loctite. Also, in the manual that came with the mill, it says
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 8, 2011
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          I should have read more carefully the instructions before installing the upgrade. It says to use loctite. Also, in the manual that came with the mill, it says to disconnect the motors from the driver box before turning the motors by hand. I have been turning the motors quite a few times and noticed the red LED on the driver box lights up when turning hand wheel. I was surprised at how little you have to turn the hand wheel to generate current. I hope I didn't reduce the life of the unit by doing this, or worse, cause damage. I will find out next time I hook up my pc.



          --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "a3sigma" <dcclark111@...> wrote:
          >
          > See: http://www.sherline.com/6700inst.htm
          >
          > Step 4 under "INSTALLING THE STEPPER MOTOR MOUNT"
          >
          > I use Loctite 290 for this sort of thing. It has good capillary action -- a drop on the screw next to the nut will wick into the threads. Threads must be clean and free of grease and oil.
          >
          > David Clark in Southern Maryland, USA
          >
          > --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "botwire" <botwire@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hey guys,
          > >
          > > After a year of waiting, I got my CNC upgrade. All is working fine now but I do have a question. A few times now, the preload nut has come loose. First, how tight does it have to be? snug? Moderately tight or very tight? Should I use blue lock tite? A luck nut? What are you guys doing for your preload nuts?
          > >
          > > Any tips for this noob? :)
          > >
          > > Thanks!
          > >
          >
        • a3sigma
          I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It s also advised to turn off
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 8, 2011
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            I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It's also advised to turn off power to the controller before unplugging or plugging in a stepper. This I don't usually bother with, especially since I often unplug only one axis, leaving the others energized to prevent movement. Again, nothing bad resulting so far. (so far, being about 10 years now)

            One big warning, though: It's really important to keep chips out of the connectors. Shorting the pins can cause really bad things to happen really quickly. I have a small spring clip on a shelf bracket above my workbench, and always hang up the female connector leads as soon as I unplug one.

            For the male ends on the motors: go to Radio Shack and buy a couple of female to female DIN connectors. Saw them in half (they're potted inside) and you'll have 4 protective caps to plug into the motor leads.

            David Clark in Southern Maryland, USA



            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "botwire" <botwire@...> wrote:
            >
            > I should have read more carefully the instructions before installing the upgrade. It says to use loctite. Also, in the manual that came with the mill, it says to disconnect the motors from the driver box before turning the motors by hand. I have been turning the motors quite a few times and noticed the red LED on the driver box lights up when turning hand wheel. I was surprised at how little you have to turn the hand wheel to generate current. I hope I didn't reduce the life of the unit by doing this, or worse, cause damage. I will find out next time I hook up my pc.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "a3sigma" <dcclark111@> wrote:
            > >
            > > See: http://www.sherline.com/6700inst.htm
            > >
            > > Step 4 under "INSTALLING THE STEPPER MOTOR MOUNT"
            > >
            > > I use Loctite 290 for this sort of thing. It has good capillary action -- a drop on the screw next to the nut will wick into the threads. Threads must be clean and free of grease and oil.
            > >
            > > David Clark in Southern Maryland, USA
            > >
            > > --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "botwire" <botwire@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hey guys,
            > > >
            > > > After a year of waiting, I got my CNC upgrade. All is working fine now but I do have a question. A few times now, the preload nut has come loose. First, how tight does it have to be? snug? Moderately tight or very tight? Should I use blue lock tite? A luck nut? What are you guys doing for your preload nuts?
            > > >
            > > > Any tips for this noob? :)
            > > >
            > > > Thanks!
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Alan
            On my home-built driver box (Geckos), I have individual switches to disable (power) each of the four axis. Alan KM6VV ... to ... stepper. ... axis, ... really
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 8, 2011
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              On my home-built driver box (Geckos), I have individual switches to disable
              (power) each of the four axis.

              Alan KM6VV

              > -----Original Message-----
              > On Behalf Of a3sigma
              >
              > I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the
              > steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It's also advised
              to
              > turn off power to the controller before unplugging or plugging in a
              stepper.
              > This I don't usually bother with, especially since I often unplug only one
              axis,
              > leaving the others energized to prevent movement. Again, nothing bad
              > resulting so far. (so far, being about 10 years now)
              >
              > One big warning, though: It's really important to keep chips out of the
              > connectors. Shorting the pins can cause really bad things to happen
              really
              > quickly. I have a small spring clip on a shelf bracket above my
              workbench, and
              > always hang up the female connector leads as soon as I unplug one.
              >
              > For the male ends on the motors: go to Radio Shack and buy a couple of
              female
              > to female DIN connectors. Saw them in half (they're potted inside) and
              you'll
              > have 4 protective caps to plug into the motor leads.
              >
              > David Clark in Southern Maryland, USA
            • Ron Ginger
              ... You have been very lucky. It is not good to unplug a stepper motor while powered up. That is very likely to zap a driver output chip or transistor. Turning
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 9, 2011
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                > I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It's also advised to turn off power to the controller before unplugging or plugging in a stepper. This I don't usually bother with, especially since I often unplug only one axis, leaving the others energized to prevent movement. Again, nothing bad resulting so far. (so far, being about 10 years now)

                You have been very lucky. It is not good to unplug a stepper motor while
                powered up. That is very likely to zap a driver output chip or transistor.

                Turning a motor by hand is no problem- you do generate a back emf, but
                so does the motor when its running or de-accelerating. The driver has
                clamp diodes to protect itself. Unless you turned the motor faster than
                its max speed you will not harm the driver.

                ron ginger
              • a3sigma
                What, me, lucky? I d rather win the lottery. I don t dispute that unplugging under power is risky. I ll try to develop the habit of turning off the
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 9, 2011
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                  What, me, lucky? I'd rather win the lottery.

                  I don't dispute that unplugging under power is risky. I'll try to develop the habit of turning off the controller when I unplug a single axis and turn it back on when I want to keep the others energized. I suppose the worst result is that one of them might move a step or two in the process, but that's a trivial distance.

                  Thanks for the response, best regards,

                  DC



                  >
                  > You have been very lucky. It is not good to unplug a stepper motor while
                  > powered up. That is very likely to zap a driver output chip or transistor.
                  >
                  > Turning a motor by hand is no problem- you do generate a back emf, but
                  > so does the motor when its running or de-accelerating. The driver has
                  > clamp diodes to protect itself. Unless you turned the motor faster than
                  > its max speed you will not harm the driver.
                  >
                  > ron ginger
                  >
                • Jeffrey T. Birt
                  The clamping diodes only prevent any back EMF from reverse polarizing the transistors. The fact that LEDs are blinking as the stepper motors are manually
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 9, 2011
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                    The clamping diodes only prevent any back EMF from reverse polarizing the
                    transistors. The fact that LEDs are blinking as the stepper motors are
                    manually turned is a clear indication that there is indeed circuitry being
                    powered. Since the control is off the transistors gate is free to float so
                    it can be in any state between on and off, there is no telling what can
                    happen. I know at least one guy on this group that blew up his driver board
                    by doing this (manually turning steppers whilst they were plugged in.)



                    Jeff Birt

                    Soigeneris.com



                    From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of Ron Ginger
                    Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:42 AM
                    To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Finally got my 5400 cnc upgrade.






                    > I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the
                    steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It's also advised to
                    turn off power to the controller before unplugging or plugging in a stepper.
                    This I don't usually bother with, especially since I often unplug only one
                    axis, leaving the others energized to prevent movement. Again, nothing bad
                    resulting so far. (so far, being about 10 years now)

                    You have been very lucky. It is not good to unplug a stepper motor while
                    powered up. That is very likely to zap a driver output chip or transistor.

                    Turning a motor by hand is no problem- you do generate a back emf, but
                    so does the motor when its running or de-accelerating. The driver has
                    clamp diodes to protect itself. Unless you turned the motor faster than
                    its max speed you will not harm the driver.

                    ron ginger





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • a3sigma
                    On the other hand, Ron: What is the mechanism by which damage is done unplugging under power? Is it that a spark jumps and creates a high voltage spike? If
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 9, 2011
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                      On the other hand, Ron:

                      What is the mechanism by which damage is done unplugging under power? Is it that a spark jumps and creates a high voltage spike? If the circuitry protects itself from a back emf, could/should it not protect itself against voltage spikes?

                      This is all outside of my area of expertise, I claim none, and take no position... just curious.

                      Then there are Jeff's points. So I suppose the best policy is "all of the above" -- power down and unplug. C'nest pas?

                      best to all,

                      DC

                      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey T. Birt" <birt_j@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The clamping diodes only prevent any back EMF from reverse polarizing the
                      > transistors. The fact that LEDs are blinking as the stepper motors are
                      > manually turned is a clear indication that there is indeed circuitry being
                      > powered. Since the control is off the transistors gate is free to float so
                      > it can be in any state between on and off, there is no telling what can
                      > happen. I know at least one guy on this group that blew up his driver board
                      > by doing this (manually turning steppers whilst they were plugged in.)
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Jeff Birt
                      >
                      > Soigeneris.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > Behalf Of Ron Ginger
                      > Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:42 AM
                      > To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Finally got my 5400 cnc upgrade.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > > I often manually machine, and have occasionally neglected to unplug the
                      > steppers beforehand. No harm done that I can perceive. It's also advised to
                      > turn off power to the controller before unplugging or plugging in a stepper.
                      > This I don't usually bother with, especially since I often unplug only one
                      > axis, leaving the others energized to prevent movement. Again, nothing bad
                      > resulting so far. (so far, being about 10 years now)
                      >
                      > You have been very lucky. It is not good to unplug a stepper motor while
                      > powered up. That is very likely to zap a driver output chip or transistor.
                      >
                      > Turning a motor by hand is no problem- you do generate a back emf, but
                      > so does the motor when its running or de-accelerating. The driver has
                      > clamp diodes to protect itself. Unless you turned the motor faster than
                      > its max speed you will not harm the driver.
                      >
                      > ron ginger
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
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