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Threading Attachment

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  • Rhys Fastiggi
    Is there a threading attachment which fill fit if you re using a riser block? [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 10, 2010
      Is there a threading attachment which fill fit if you're using a riser block?



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brian
      Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable wax. Interesting and useful information. Wonder if I might get a bit more information.
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 17, 2012
        Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable wax. Interesting and useful information.

        Wonder if I might get a bit more information. I'm using Freeman wax, cutting (Sherline mill) with a .005" diameter end mill at 7500 rpm and 16 ipm to a depth of .003" in three passes. I'm getting a bit of very fine "dandruff" swarf that I'm not able to remove.

        A Freeman Wax rep suggests I switch from its blue machinable wax to what it calls Wizard Wax, a harder material. It doesn't advertise it on its Web site (for some reason).

        I've just run an air line hose from a 5.5 hp compressor to my mill table, reducing from 3/4 hose to 1/4 hose in order to use an extra Passche airbrush to blow chips from the end mill during cutting. Haven't had a chance to try it yet.

        Thought someone here with experience cutting machinable wax with mini cutters might have some suggestions to pass on about speed and feed, and whatever else seems pertinent.

        Thanks much,

        Brian Chapman
        Evansdale, Iowa

        -----------

        Dan Pines
        Nov 1, 2010
        milling wax
        I would be gratefull for any pointers on the subject. . . .

        1. Any specific grade of wax?
        2. Will the std 2800 rpm spindle suffice or is there a need for the 10,000 rpm spindle?
        3. Which type of cutter would be best for achieving uniform smooth curved surfaces, ball end, wide V shape, narrow (15 deg) V shape? At what speed? I have seen recommendations for 30k rpm at 200 ipm, clearly not possible on a Sherline mill. . . .



        Richard Howell
        Re: milling wax
        Harvey Tool has 1 flute cutters, which will produce less heat and allow for faster feed rates in plastic and wax. . . .



        Tom Wade
        Re: milling wax
        Here is a sheet of instructions for using the wax:
        http://tomwade.me/tw/machinist/machinable-wax.pdf



        David Clark
        Re: milling wax
        Was just milling some wax yesterday. I'm machining molds to cast pipe fittings (tees, elbows, etc.) in plastic for my Fulton engine model. I use a ball end mill to cut half pipes in each half of the wax mold, then clamp them together and pour in the casting resin.

        I use wax from McMaster:
        http://www.mcmaster.com/#machinable-wax/=9j41vq

        I flycut the mating surfaces of the mold with a large radius tool at around 500 rpm and 4 ipm to get them flat and smooth enough not to leak water thin resin.

        I cut the pipe paths with 2 flute HSS ball end mills, 1/4 and 3/8 inch, at around 1000 rpm and 6 ipm feed. This gives me very nice surface finishes, but I don't think speeds and feeds are at all critical here. . . .
      • DonH
        Well I might be able to help with that--our CNC class uses wax stock for labs (much cheaper, and saves on destruction of tooling and machines due to bad
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 17, 2012
          Well I might be able to help with that--our CNC class uses wax stock for labs (much cheaper, and saves on destruction of tooling and machines due to bad programming by students).  We won't be working in the lab for another few weeks, but I'll let you know the speeds and feeds we use.

          I can tell you that I've seen quite a mess in the lab from previous semesters.  I'm not sure how clean and neat you can get when using the wax.

          best,
          Don


          ________________________________
          From: Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
          To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 2:14 PM
          Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: milling wax

          Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable wax. Interesting and useful information.

          Wonder if I might get a bit more information. I'm using Freeman wax, cutting (Sherline mill) with a .005" diameter end mill at 7500 rpm and 16 ipm to a depth of .003" in three passes. I'm getting a bit of very fine "dandruff" swarf that I'm not able to remove.

          A Freeman Wax rep suggests I switch from its blue machinable wax to what it calls Wizard Wax, a harder material. It doesn't advertise it on its Web site (for some reason).

          I've just run an air line hose from a 5.5 hp compressor to my mill table, reducing from 3/4 hose to 1/4 hose in order to use an extra Passche airbrush to blow chips from the end mill during cutting. Haven't had a chance to try it yet.

          Thought someone here with experience cutting machinable wax with mini cutters might have some suggestions to pass on about speed and feed, and whatever else seems pertinent.

          Thanks much,

          Brian Chapman
          Evansdale, Iowa

          -----------

          Dan Pines
          Nov 1, 2010
          milling wax
          I would be gratefull for any pointers on the subject. . . .

          1. Any specific grade of wax?
          2. Will the std 2800 rpm spindle suffice or is there a need for the 10,000 rpm spindle?
          3. Which type of cutter would be best for achieving uniform smooth curved surfaces, ball end, wide V shape, narrow (15 deg) V shape? At what speed? I have seen recommendations for 30k rpm at 200 ipm, clearly not possible on a Sherline mill. . . .



          Richard Howell
          Re: milling wax
          Harvey Tool has 1 flute cutters, which will produce less heat and allow for faster feed rates in plastic and wax. . . .



          Tom Wade
          Re: milling wax
          Here is a sheet of instructions for using the wax:
          http://tomwade.me/tw/machinist/machinable-wax.pdf



          David Clark
          Re: milling wax
          Was just milling some wax yesterday. I'm machining molds to cast pipe fittings (tees, elbows, etc.) in plastic for my Fulton engine model. I use a ball end mill to cut half pipes in each half of the wax mold, then clamp them together and pour in the casting resin.

          I use wax from McMaster:
          http://www.mcmaster.com/#machinable-wax/=9j41vq

          I flycut the mating surfaces of the mold with a large radius tool at around 500 rpm and 4 ipm to get them flat and smooth enough not to leak water thin resin.

          I cut the pipe paths with 2 flute HSS ball end mills, 1/4 and 3/8 inch, at around 1000 rpm and 6 ipm feed. This gives me very nice surface finishes, but I don't think speeds and feeds are at all critical here. . . .





          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brian
          Don, I ll look forward to hearing from you! The larger cutters do a terrific job with the wax, it s those darn tiny cutters that seem to be the bugaboo (I ve
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 17, 2012
            Don,

            I'll look forward to hearing from you!

            The larger cutters do a terrific job with the wax, it's those darn tiny cutters that seem to be the bugaboo (I've read about this problem elsewhere, too; I'm relieved it's not just me).

            I've dedicated a shop vac reduced to a 5/8" dia. plastic hose and plastic "wand" end piece with a 3/8" dia. opening to picking up wax only. Clean filter and canister. Figure I'll collect what I can and remelt later, also keep the area cleaned up. Works well so far.

            I have a Sherline-Flashcut CNC setup. I'm not sure how fast an ipm feed this machinery is capable of; I've got my Flashcut manual with me at work, hopefully I can pinpoint the info tonight.

            Just to be clear: The 7500 rpm and 16 ipm feed did no visible harm to the .005 end mill tool, so that's a good thing.

            -Brian Chapman
            Evansdale, Iowa

            ----------

            > Well I might be able to help with that--our CNC class uses wax stock for labs (much cheaper, and saves on destruction of tooling and machines due to bad programming by students).  We won't be working in the lab for another few weeks, but I'll let you know the speeds and feeds we use.
            >
            > I can tell you that I've seen quite a mess in the lab from previous semesters.  I'm not sure how clean and neat you can get when using the wax.
            >
            > best,
            > Don
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
            > To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 2:14 PM
            > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: milling wax
            >
            > Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable wax. Interesting and useful information.
            >
            > Wonder if I might get a bit more information. I'm using Freeman wax, cutting (Sherline mill) with a .005" diameter end mill at 7500 rpm and 16 ipm to a depth of .003" in three passes. I'm getting a bit of very fine "dandruff" swarf that I'm not able to remove.
            >
            > A Freeman Wax rep suggests I switch from its blue machinable wax to what it calls Wizard Wax, a harder material. It doesn't advertise it on its Web site (for some reason).
            >
            > I've just run an air line hose from a 5.5 hp compressor to my mill table, reducing from 3/4 hose to 1/4 hose in order to use an extra Passche airbrush to blow chips from the end mill during cutting. Haven't had a chance to try it yet.
            >
            > Thought someone here with experience cutting machinable wax with mini cutters might have some suggestions to pass on about speed and feed, and whatever else seems pertinent.
            >
            > Thanks much,
            >
            > Brian Chapman
            > Evansdale, Iowa
            >
            > -----------
            >
            > Dan Pines
            > Nov 1, 2010
            > milling wax
            > I would be gratefull for any pointers on the subject. . . .
            >
            > 1. Any specific grade of wax?
            > 2. Will the std 2800 rpm spindle suffice or is there a need for the 10,000 rpm spindle?
            > 3. Which type of cutter would be best for achieving uniform smooth curved surfaces, ball end, wide V shape, narrow (15 deg) V shape? At what speed? I have seen recommendations for 30k rpm at 200 ipm, clearly not possible on a Sherline mill. . . .
            >
            >
            >
            > Richard Howell
            > Re: milling wax
            > Harvey Tool has 1 flute cutters, which will produce less heat and allow for faster feed rates in plastic and wax. . . .
            >
            >
            >
            > Tom Wade
            > Re: milling wax
            > Here is a sheet of instructions for using the wax:
            > http://tomwade.me/tw/machinist/machinable-wax.pdf
            >
            >
            >
            > David Clark
            > Re: milling wax
            > Was just milling some wax yesterday. I'm machining molds to cast pipe fittings (tees, elbows, etc.) in plastic for my Fulton engine model. I use a ball end mill to cut half pipes in each half of the wax mold, then clamp them together and pour in the casting resin.
            >
            > I use wax from McMaster:
            > http://www.mcmaster.com/#machinable-wax/=9j41vq
            >
            > I flycut the mating surfaces of the mold with a large radius tool at around 500 rpm and 4 ipm to get them flat and smooth enough not to leak water thin resin.
            >
            > I cut the pipe paths with 2 flute HSS ball end mills, 1/4 and 3/8 inch, at around 1000 rpm and 6 ipm feed. This gives me very nice surface finishes, but I don't think speeds and feeds are at all critical here. . . .
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Andre
            Hi Don, You should use the hardest wax you can find. I believe that Freedom blue is most suitible for hand carving. Try Freedom Green . I use it. It is
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 17, 2012
              Hi Don,



              You should use the hardest wax you can find. I believe that Freedom 'blue'
              is most suitible for hand carving. Try Freedom 'Green'. I use it. It is
              quite hard.



              You may want to look at using 'wax' cutters for finer detail.



              Andre Pienaar



              South Africa



              From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Brian
              Sent: 17 January 2012 23:44
              To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: milling wax





              Don,

              I'll look forward to hearing from you!

              The larger cutters do a terrific job with the wax, it's those darn tiny
              cutters that seem to be the bugaboo (I've read about this problem elsewhere,
              too; I'm relieved it's not just me).

              I've dedicated a shop vac reduced to a 5/8" dia. plastic hose and plastic
              "wand" end piece with a 3/8" dia. opening to picking up wax only. Clean
              filter and canister. Figure I'll collect what I can and remelt later, also
              keep the area cleaned up. Works well so far.

              I have a Sherline-Flashcut CNC setup. I'm not sure how fast an ipm feed this
              machinery is capable of; I've got my Flashcut manual with me at work,
              hopefully I can pinpoint the info tonight.

              Just to be clear: The 7500 rpm and 16 ipm feed did no visible harm to the
              .005 end mill tool, so that's a good thing.

              -Brian Chapman
              Evansdale, Iowa

              ----------

              > Well I might be able to help with that--our CNC class uses wax stock for
              labs (much cheaper, and saves on destruction of tooling and machines due to
              bad programming by students). We won't be working in the lab for another
              few weeks, but I'll let you know the speeds and feeds we use.
              >
              > I can tell you that I've seen quite a mess in the lab from previous
              semesters. I'm not sure how clean and neat you can get when using the wax.
              >
              > best,
              > Don
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
              > To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SherlineCNC%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 2:14 PM
              > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: milling wax
              >
              > Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable wax.
              Interesting and useful information.
              >
              > Wonder if I might get a bit more information. I'm using Freeman wax,
              cutting (Sherline mill) with a .005" diameter end mill at 7500 rpm and 16
              ipm to a depth of .003" in three passes. I'm getting a bit of very fine
              "dandruff" swarf that I'm not able to remove.
              >
              > A Freeman Wax rep suggests I switch from its blue machinable wax to what
              it calls Wizard Wax, a harder material. It doesn't advertise it on its Web
              site (for some reason).
              >
              > I've just run an air line hose from a 5.5 hp compressor to my mill table,
              reducing from 3/4 hose to 1/4 hose in order to use an extra Passche airbrush
              to blow chips from the end mill during cutting. Haven't had a chance to try
              it yet.
              >
              > Thought someone here with experience cutting machinable wax with mini
              cutters might have some suggestions to pass on about speed and feed, and
              whatever else seems pertinent.
              >
              > Thanks much,
              >
              > Brian Chapman
              > Evansdale, Iowa
              >
              > -----------
              >
              > Dan Pines
              > Nov 1, 2010
              > milling wax
              > I would be gratefull for any pointers on the subject. . . .
              >
              > 1. Any specific grade of wax?
              > 2. Will the std 2800 rpm spindle suffice or is there a need for the 10,000
              rpm spindle?
              > 3. Which type of cutter would be best for achieving uniform smooth curved
              surfaces, ball end, wide V shape, narrow (15 deg) V shape? At what speed? I
              have seen recommendations for 30k rpm at 200 ipm, clearly not possible on a
              Sherline mill. . . .
              >
              >
              >
              > Richard Howell
              > Re: milling wax
              > Harvey Tool has 1 flute cutters, which will produce less heat and allow
              for faster feed rates in plastic and wax. . . .
              >
              >
              >
              > Tom Wade
              > Re: milling wax
              > Here is a sheet of instructions for using the wax:
              > http://tomwade.me/tw/machinist/machinable-wax.pdf
              >
              >
              >
              > David Clark
              > Re: milling wax
              > Was just milling some wax yesterday. I'm machining molds to cast pipe
              fittings (tees, elbows, etc.) in plastic for my Fulton engine model. I use a
              ball end mill to cut half pipes in each half of the wax mold, then clamp
              them together and pour in the casting resin.
              >
              > I use wax from McMaster:
              > http://www.mcmaster.com/#machinable-wax/=9j41vq
              >
              > I flycut the mating surfaces of the mold with a large radius tool at
              around 500 rpm and 4 ipm to get them flat and smooth enough not to leak
              water thin resin.
              >
              > I cut the pipe paths with 2 flute HSS ball end mills, 1/4 and 3/8 inch, at
              around 1000 rpm and 6 ipm feed. This gives me very nice surface finishes,
              but I don't think speeds and feeds are at all critical here. . . .
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >



              _____

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2012.0.1901 / Virus Database: 2109/4748 - Release Date: 01/17/12



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • qcwmark
              Brian, You don t mention what the surface you are machining looks like, but if you can go with a tapered cutter I think you will find it a lot stronger,
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 17, 2012
                Brian, You don't mention what the surface you are machining looks
                like, but if you can go with a tapered cutter I think you will find it
                a lot stronger, which will allow taking a heavier cut. I like to take
                about .008" depth with a .005" tapered cutter at a stepover of
                .001" for a final cut, running at about 16 IPM and 12,000 RPM. I
                think you'll get better chip removal than with a .001" depth of
                cut (larger chips less likely to create the fuzz). I like these:
                http://bitsbits.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=3_68&products\
                _id=322
                <http://bitsbits.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=3_68&product\
                s_id=322> , a spiral cutter with 6 degree included angle (3 degree
                draft angle). You'll get nearly a vertical edge if you're
                pocketing, but you can go way deeper than with an end mill. If you can
                use a 10 or 15 degree included angle, then you can run a lot deeper and
                faster with good tool life. A .010" 15 degree cutter can run all day
                at .080" depth of cut at 40 IPM in wax.
                I like to coat the surface with mineral oil before the final cut. It
                keeps those fine shavings from sticking to the surface. Coolant works
                also, but not as well, and it runs off/dries up too quickly, so you
                have to keep painting it on. The mineral oil stays put so you
                don't have to mind the mill.
                Soap it off with a stiff brush and then blast with a water pik (the
                dental cleaner, get one at a drug store). Definitely experiment with
                harder wax. I like Matt Green, available at jeweler's supplies
                http://www.gesswein.com/p-7810-matt-smooth-precision-wax-tablet-sets.asp\
                x
                <http://www.gesswein.com/p-7810-matt-smooth-precision-wax-tablet-sets.as\
                px>
                Good luck, Mark--- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian"
                <cornbeltroute@...> wrote:
                >
                > Came across a thread here from November 2010 about milling machinable
                wax. Interesting and useful information.
                >
                > Wonder if I might get a bit more information. I'm using Freeman wax,
                cutting (Sherline mill) with a .005" diameter end mill at 7500 rpm and
                16 ipm to a depth of .003" in three passes. I'm getting a bit of very
                fine "dandruff" swarf that I'm not able to remove.
                >
                > A Freeman Wax rep suggests I switch from its blue machinable wax to
                what it calls Wizard Wax, a harder material. It doesn't advertise it on
                its Web site (for some reason).
                >
                > I've just run an air line hose from a 5.5 hp compressor to my mill
                table, reducing from 3/4 hose to 1/4 hose in order to use an extra
                Passche airbrush to blow chips from the end mill during cutting. Haven't
                had a chance to try it yet.
                >
                > Thought someone here with experience cutting machinable wax with mini
                cutters might have some suggestions to pass on about speed and feed, and
                whatever else seems pertinent.
                >
                > Thanks much,
                >
                > Brian Chapman
                > Evansdale, Iowa
                >
                > -----------
                >
                > Dan Pines
                > Nov 1, 2010
                > milling wax
                > I would be gratefull for any pointers on the subject. . . .
                >
                > 1. Any specific grade of wax?
                > 2. Will the std 2800 rpm spindle suffice or is there a need for the
                10,000 rpm spindle?
                > 3. Which type of cutter would be best for achieving uniform smooth
                curved surfaces, ball end, wide V shape, narrow (15 deg) V shape? At
                what speed? I have seen recommendations for 30k rpm at 200 ipm, clearly
                not possible on a Sherline mill. . . .
                >
                >
                >
                > Richard Howell
                > Re: milling wax
                > Harvey Tool has 1 flute cutters, which will produce less heat and
                allow for faster feed rates in plastic and wax. . . .
                >
                >
                >
                > Tom Wade
                > Re: milling wax
                > Here is a sheet of instructions for using the wax:
                > http://tomwade.me/tw/machinist/machinable-wax.pdf
                >
                >
                >
                > David Clark
                > Re: milling wax
                > Was just milling some wax yesterday. I'm machining molds to cast pipe
                fittings (tees, elbows, etc.) in plastic for my Fulton engine model. I
                use a ball end mill to cut half pipes in each half of the wax mold, then
                clamp them together and pour in the casting resin.
                >
                > I use wax from McMaster:
                > http://www.mcmaster.com/#machinable-wax/=9j41vq
                >
                > I flycut the mating surfaces of the mold with a large radius tool at
                around 500 rpm and 4 ipm to get them flat and smooth enough not to leak
                water thin resin.
                >
                > I cut the pipe paths with 2 flute HSS ball end mills, 1/4 and 3/8
                inch, at around 1000 rpm and 6 ipm feed. This gives me very nice surface
                finishes, but I don't think speeds and feeds are at all critical here. .
                . .
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Brian
                Andre, Mark, based on your comments, I m moving ahead, so I thank you. Today I bought a couple pounds of Machinable Wax s new enviro green wax, developed, the
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 18, 2012
                  Andre, Mark, based on your comments, I'm moving ahead, so I thank you.

                  Today I bought a couple pounds of Machinable Wax's new enviro green wax, developed, the person I spoke with said, to aid chip removal for the tiniest cutting tools. The green is harder, more brittle than the blue. (Later, I came across interesting wax offerings at DeArmond Tool.)

                  Also, spoke with a person at bits&bits (its Web site has a menu section devoted to wax cutting tools, nice!). I recalled that I ordered several sale item cutters from the company last spring, including a .003" tip pyramid cutter. So, I'll test this cutter on the green wax when it arrives, using mineral oil and the airbrush to blow away chips.

                  If this doesn't work, maybe I'll give it up . . . ;-)

                  I sure appreciate the help I've received here,

                  -Brian Chapman
                  Evansdale, Iowa
                • David Lorenz
                  I licensed my Mach 3 installation a few weeks ago and when I did I allowed the installer to upgrade lazycam as well. Now if I select Load LCam from Mach 3 it
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 1, 2012
                    I licensed my Mach 3 installation a few weeks ago and when I did I allowed
                    the installer to upgrade lazycam as well. Now if I select "Load LCam" from
                    Mach 3 it will load but without the G-Code from Mach! When I try to import
                    it into LCam it reports "No Mach 3 found" and the same thing is reported
                    when I try to load from LCam to Mach 3. I can see no workaround as LCam
                    doesn't seem to load G-Code?? The same thing happens on my main PC with a
                    fresh install so I doubt I'm alone here. Any Thoughts? I have read in many
                    places that folks like LCam but I'm not sure if that means the free version
                    or the 'PRO' I had hoped that I could at least use it to reorder chains and
                    such.



                    Also curious about how others measure backlash on a rotary table and read
                    the other day that backlash on a rotary axis could be effectively dealt with
                    in true degree mode but that it would wreak havoc in 'Wrap Mode' where an
                    axis is converted from linear to radial because the linear length changes
                    with each cut backlash can't compensate. Makes sense, but hadn't occurred to
                    me. Again Any Thoughts??



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ken Condal
                    I use Mach3 backlash compensation on X,Y and Z but have never needed it on the RT. I ve done lots of 4th axis work and never noticed a problem. Just my two
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 1, 2012
                      I use Mach3 backlash compensation on X,Y and Z but have never needed it on
                      the RT. I've done lots of 4th axis work and never noticed a problem.



                      Just my two cents,



                      Ken





                      _____

                      From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
                      Behalf Of David Lorenz
                      Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2012 2:22 PM
                      To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [SherlineCNC] Lazycam





                      I licensed my Mach 3 installation a few weeks ago and when I did I allowed
                      the installer to upgrade lazycam as well. Now if I select "Load LCam" from
                      Mach 3 it will load but without the G-Code from Mach! When I try to import
                      it into LCam it reports "No Mach 3 found" and the same thing is reported
                      when I try to load from LCam to Mach 3. I can see no workaround as LCam
                      doesn't seem to load G-Code?? The same thing happens on my main PC with a
                      fresh install so I doubt I'm alone here. Any Thoughts? I have read in many
                      places that folks like LCam but I'm not sure if that means the free version
                      or the 'PRO' I had hoped that I could at least use it to reorder chains and
                      such.

                      Also curious about how others measure backlash on a rotary table and read
                      the other day that backlash on a rotary axis could be effectively dealt with
                      in true degree mode but that it would wreak havoc in 'Wrap Mode' where an
                      axis is converted from linear to radial because the linear length changes
                      with each cut backlash can't compensate. Makes sense, but hadn't occurred to
                      me. Again Any Thoughts??

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Ron Ginger
                      ... I think you will have much better luck getting lazycam info on the mach support list. There are people there tha tuse it, and Art follows it as well. I
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 2, 2012
                        > I licensed my Mach 3 installation a few weeks ago and when I did I allowed
                        > the installer to upgrade lazycam as well. Now if I select "Load LCam" from
                        > Mach 3 it will load but without the G-Code from Mach! When I try to import
                        > it into LCam it reports "No Mach 3 found" and the same thing is reported
                        > when I try to load from LCam to Mach 3. I can see no workaround as LCam
                        > doesn't seem to load G-Code?? The same thing happens on my main PC with a
                        > fresh install so I doubt I'm alone here. Any Thoughts? I have read in many
                        > places that folks like LCam but I'm not sure if that means the free version
                        > or the 'PRO' I had hoped that I could at least use it to reorder chains and
                        > such.
                        >

                        I think you will have much better luck getting lazycam info on the mach
                        support list. There are people there tha tuse it, and Art follows it as
                        well.

                        I dont use it, but I have read there are license issues with it

                        ron ginger
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