Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: IMService Rapid Tool Changer for Mill

Expand Messages
  • imserv1
    ... Place a tool holder in the rapid changer body and use the wrench flats to tighten the body to the spindle. ... Only use these if you are placing a 1/2
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "KWC" <kencondal@...> wrote:
      >
      > I just received my Rapid Tool Changer and have some questions before I use it.
      >
      > The main body that connects to the mill doesn't have any holes for tommy bars so I'm wondering how to tighten / loosen it.
      >

      Place a tool holder in the rapid changer body and use the wrench flats to tighten the body to the spindle.

      > The tool holders have set screws, but I can't figure out their purpose.

      Only use these if you are placing a 1/2 shank tool in the holder. Otherwise use the collets up to 3/8 dia.

      > How would you recommend tightening the collet holder to the tool holder? They both accept open end wrenches but I'm wondering if they should be tightened "in mid air" or when being held by the main body.

      Use whichever technique that works for you.

      > Finally, since the main intent is to have a "known" tool length, where would you recommend taking measurements from and how would you zero the Z axis?

      Measure from the tip of a tool installed in the holder. You can zero your part ( and machine) to the first tool, and measure the rest relative to that one.

      For best results, establish a known and repeatable machine Z=0 with a home switch, and then measure all tools as the distance from there to a "known" position as your tool length. On our machining center, we use the 3" side of a 1-2-3 block, placed on a protected part of a vise that is never removed from the machine. On a Sherline, you can use the 2" side of a 1-2-3 block placed on top of the table.

      Fred Smith - IMService
      http://www.imsrv.com
    • Ken Condal
      Thanks Fred, I ll give your suggestions a try. I had no idea I could use 1/2 tools as well - that s a nice bonus. I have a large collection of carbide tipped
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Fred, I'll give your suggestions a try.



        I had no idea I could use 1/2" tools as well - that's a nice bonus.



        I have a large collection of carbide tipped woodworking router bits. Does
        anyone know if they'll work on aluminum or brass? Not a panel raising bit of
        course, but something like a small round over, chamfer or v-groove.



        Thanks,

        Ken





        _____

        From: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of imserv1
        Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 9:58 AM
        To: SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: IMService Rapid Tool Changer for Mill







        --- In SherlineCNC@ <mailto:SherlineCNC%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com,
        "KWC" <kencondal@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just received my Rapid Tool Changer and have some questions before I use
        it.
        >
        > The main body that connects to the mill doesn't have any holes for tommy
        bars so I'm wondering how to tighten / loosen it.
        >

        Place a tool holder in the rapid changer body and use the wrench flats to
        tighten the body to the spindle.

        > The tool holders have set screws, but I can't figure out their purpose.

        Only use these if you are placing a 1/2 shank tool in the holder. Otherwise
        use the collets up to 3/8 dia.

        > How would you recommend tightening the collet holder to the tool holder?
        They both accept open end wrenches but I'm wondering if they should be
        tightened "in mid air" or when being held by the main body.

        Use whichever technique that works for you.

        > Finally, since the main intent is to have a "known" tool length, where
        would you recommend taking measurements from and how would you zero the Z
        axis?

        Measure from the tip of a tool installed in the holder. You can zero your
        part ( and machine) to the first tool, and measure the rest relative to that
        one.

        For best results, establish a known and repeatable machine Z=0 with a home
        switch, and then measure all tools as the distance from there to a "known"
        position as your tool length. On our machining center, we use the 3" side of
        a 1-2-3 block, placed on a protected part of a vise that is never removed
        from the machine. On a Sherline, you can use the 2" side of a 1-2-3 block
        placed on top of the table.

        Fred Smith - IMService
        http://www.imsrv <http://www.imsrv.com> com



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.