Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [SherlineCNC] Re: Constant Sherline issues..

Expand Messages
  • Martin Dobbins
    Don, I m happy you ve found a solution that is working for you (at least on the test pieces).  Just remember when you get on to the main job that has caused
    Message 1 of 70 , May 31, 2009
      Don,

      I'm happy you've found a solution that is working for you (at least on the test pieces).  Just remember when you get on to the main job that has caused you so many headaches, nil desperandum if things don't go exactly right on the first attempt or two. 

      Get back to us if you have problems and we'll try to help, better still if everything goes just as it should let us know that too.

      Cheers,

      Martin

      --- On Sun, 5/31/09, <dnldkempton@...> wrote:















      It appears Martin may have had the correct answer from the beginning..all my issues I had previously blamed on myself, mechanical failure, or loose parts seem to have vanished.



      I put together an old computer I was just about to throw away.. luckily, I had just enough parts from about 4 different computers to make one. I had to pull the CD drive from the Sherline computer, since mine was toast..



      After loading Lunix, configuring my .ini file, and doing some cuts.. I'm finally happy. 4 test pieces have turned out flawlessly!! ! Thats a record for me..!



      My Sherline computer was faulty from the beginning.. creating lags, and allowing the steppers to "over step" from time to time. It's unfortunate I recieved a faulty computer, but I learned alot more than I would have if it had worked correctly out of the box. This kind of thing happens.. but I'm glad it's finally working.



      --- In SherlineCNC@ yahoogroups. com, "dnldkempton" <dnldkempton@ ...> wrote:

      >

      > I believe I have a couple computers laying around here.. I suppose I could cobble one together.

      >

      > The Z axis had just raised itself above the workpiece, and cleared everything going 0,0,0 to begin the next pass when this happened. It moved with "authority" when plunging down into the workpiece. Seemed to me to be a computer/software glitch, but if I knew for sure, I wouldn't have to ask for help at every turn.

      >

      > I also noticed this in the past.. when I jogged the machine manually, sometimes it would not stop when I let off the arrow keys. It would continue moving for sometimes up to 3-4 inches. A reboot made it react like normal again.. stop moving as soon as I let off the key. This raise any flags?

      >

      >

      >

      > --- In SherlineCNC@ yahoogroups. com, "Harry Brill Jr." <proaudioguy@ > wrote:

      > >

      > > Don't you have a spare around the house you could use?  Seems like I'm always finding another old computer in my garage and putting it by the road.  I have working 6 laptops with serial and parallel ports

      > >

      > > Harry Brill Jr.

      > >

      > > --- On Sat, 5/30/09, dnldkempton <dnldkempton@ > wrote:

      > >

      > > From: dnldkempton <dnldkempton@ >

      > > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Constant Sherline issues..

      > > To: SherlineCNC@ yahoogroups. com

      > > Date: Saturday, May 30, 2009, 1:04 PM

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > I appreciate any and all input!

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > Tonight, I was "lucky" enough to see the Z axis fault in action. When nearly completing a test piece in aluminum (the MDF piece was flawless), the X/Y axis zero'ed to begin the last pass, but while watching the readout on the computer, the Z axis kept moving downward even after the software had moved on to the X axis movement. Z axis stated .170" and the Z axis kept moving about another .250 past that. Lucky I was there to stop the stepper motors.. I don't know where the Z axis would have stopped moving.

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > Thinking I should swap this computer out still.. :(

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > --- In SherlineCNC@ yahoogroups. com, "alenz2002" <alenz@> wrote:

      > >

      > > >

      > >

      > > > --- In SherlineCNC@ yahoogroups. com, "Doug Rundell" <drundell1@> wrote:

      > >

      > > > >

      > >

      > > > > Fred,

      > >

      > > > >

      > >

      > > > > Shouldn't the test work with motors also?

      > >

      > > >

      > >

      > > >

      > >

      > > > Doug,

      > >

      > > > Fred was a bit brief in his description and a crucial point may have been missed.

      > >

      > > > Using Fred's method set the hand wheel to zero by approaching it in a CW direction. Now set the DI to zero. Next turn the hand wheel CCW one turn and then return it back to zero. Verify that the DI returned to zero. (It should if the system is mechanically sound, but this is not backlash). Now turn the hand wheel one turn CW and then back to zero. The reading on the DI will indicate backlash. It will surely not be zero, however, the closer the better. Backlash is the difference in actual position that occurs when approached from opposite directions and is a combination of slop in the lead screw/nut, lead screw end play and friction/load vs. flexibility of the machine. The latter has more effect than one might suppose and in the real world can never be absolute zero.

      > >

      > > > Al

      > >

      > > > PS This procedure should be repeatable using steppers also.

      > >

      > > > al

      > >

      > > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > >

      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      > >

      >































      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • shipmodelmaker1931
      Hi Bill, you are right on. Why? Two set screws diametrically opposed can alow pivoting. Two set screws at 90 degrees to each other take up any play in the
      Message 70 of 70 , Sep 18, 2009
        Hi Bill,
        you are right on.
        Why?
        Two set screws diametrically opposed can alow pivoting.
        Two set screws at 90 degrees to each other take up any play in the proper way.
        Regards,
        Jerry G (Glickstein)







        - In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, William Rutiser <wruyahoo05@...> wrote:
        >
        > David Morrow wrote:
        > > But, having said tht, I've had the same problem occasionally with my X axis failing to turn. The setscrew seemed ok and I took everything apart and when it all went back together, all was fine.
        > >
        > > Next time, I think I'll drill and tap another hole in the coupler 180 degrees opposite and use two set screws. It's been a while since I've had mine apart so I'm not positive about accessibility on this.
        > >
        > > David
        > >
        > I seem to recall that it is better practice to put the second setscrew
        > 90 degrees from the first.
        >
        > Bill
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.