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Re: Flood coolant system

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  • David Morrow
    It s a pan that I made up. I used marine grade plywood but I could likely have used just about any good quality plywood. I primed it well and then painted all
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 1, 2007
      It's a pan that I made up. I used marine grade plywood but I could
      likely have used just about any good quality plywood. I primed it well
      and then painted all of the seams several times first with a good
      quality enamel paint. Then gave the whole thing 3 additional coats of
      enamel.

      I just added two more photo's of the drain for you...
      http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm

      I normally use a fairly generic water soluble coolant that is diluted
      about 90% with water.

      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, Tom Hubin <thubin@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello David,
      >
      > Looks good.
      >
      > What is the mill sitting in? Is that a sink of some sort?
      >
      > Where is the drain hole?
      >
      > What will you use for coolant?
      >
      > Tom Hubin
      > thubin@...
      >
      > **********************
      >
      > David Morrow wrote:
      > >
      > > I finally decided to build a flood coolant system for my Sherline
      > > 2000. It's complete but not yet tested. That won't come for a few more
      > > days as I tidy things up a bit. Not very expensive and easy to find
      > > the parts and assemble.
      > >
      > > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm
      > > <http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm>
      >
    • David Morrow
      I hadn t thought about coolant getting into the steppers; I was more concerned about the wiring. But I think you raise an interesting point. Maybe that will be
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2007
        I hadn't thought about coolant getting into the steppers; I was more
        concerned about the wiring. But I think you raise an interesting
        point. Maybe that will be my next project - some stepper shields.

        I hope that I can keep the coolant flow to a minimum so flooding the
        electrical bits doesn't become an issue. If coolant got into the
        mounts, I wonder if it would be as simple as drilling a couple of 1/4"
        holes in the bottom of the mount to keep it draining out.

        The box was just designed in my mind. I used 3/4" marine plywood. It's
        4 feet wide, about 22" front to back, and about 9" high which should
        be enough to contain the spray. If not, I'll just add a little extra
        on top. I have to make something to shield the operator still but that
        will likely be something removable, perhaps fabric or thin rubber
        sheet with quick attach / detach connectors to the sides.

        --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Yahoo" <yahoo@...> wrote:
        >
        > Very cool! (No pun intended) I can't tell you how many nights I've laid
        > awake trying to figure out how to make a flood coolant system for the
        > Sherline. I did some experiments but found the coolant gets inside the
        > stepper motor mounts, so I was afraid it would get into the motors. You
        > didn't say anything about how you made that nifty sink the machine
        sits in.
        > I would like to see more details on that and how you keep the
        coolant out of
        > the steppers.
        > --
        > Phil Mattison
        > http://www.ohmikron.com/
        > Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
        > To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 10:07 PM
        > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Flood coolant system
        >
        >
        > > I finally decided to build a flood coolant system for my Sherline
        > > 2000. It's complete but not yet tested. That won't come for a few more
        > > days as I tidy things up a bit. Not very expensive and easy to find
        > > the parts and assemble.
        > >
        > > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm
        > >
        >
      • Phil
        David, A few questions about your very fine coolant system. A water based coolant? Is there a rust inhibitor in it? Could one put some gasket material on the
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 1, 2007
          David,
          A few questions about your very fine coolant system.
          A water based coolant? Is there a rust inhibitor in it?
          Could one put some gasket material on the stepper motor and cone
          mountings to keep the coolant out?
          Did you use a normal 1.5 inch drain with a catch screen like the one
          sees in bathroom sinks?
          Could you take some pictures of the plywood box, both top and bottom?
          How did you mount the mill in the box?
          Thanks, Phil
        • David Morrow
          Don t know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass, aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the lead screws show no
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 1, 2007
            Don't know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass,
            aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the
            lead screws show no signs of rust.

            If I make a shield for the motors, I will just use some light aluminum
            and cut it to mount on the two top stepper mounting machine screws and
            then just bend it over top of the motor. This may be a flood coolant
            system but that (to me) just means flooding the cutter end, not
            creating a bath tub full of coolant. I expect some heavy spray but not
            a major dunking.

            I cut the drain hole with a hole saw in a drill. I turned a piece of
            aluminum on the lathe to fit that hole and the drain hose. If you put
            a sink drain with a catch screen they you probably really would fill
            up the "tub". A sink drain with the screen cut out might would quite
            nicely. The top part of the flange is probably 1/8" high or so -
            therefore you'll likely always have 1/8" of coolant sitting around the
            drain. Not with mine. I just epoxied the tube in place. My last system
            had about a 1/2" drain with no screen and the swarf clogged it up
            fairly regularly. See my photo's and you will see the big ABS pipe and
            mesh which is the filter.

            The mill base is my "Ultra Base" - one that I made from 1" x 11" x 22"
            steel plate. I drill holes to screw it to the box but don't have plans
            to screw it down. That thing is so bloody heavy (about 72 pounds) that
            it's not going anywhere.
            http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/sherlinebase/sherlinebase.htm

            The top of the box is pretty well shown on the web page; the bottom
            just looks like a piece of rectangular plywood. Essentially, I just
            made a box of about 24"x48" with 9-10" high sides. I screwed in a
            piece of 3/4" x 22" x 12" plywood in the center for the mill to sit
            on. There is a 2" gap between the end of that piece and the front of
            the box. You can see this in the second to last photo - that's where
            the drain is. I then cut two pieces of cabinet grade 3/8" plywood for
            the sloped bottom. The slope is not very steep. I didn't think it
            needed to be and didn't want the X axis motor to bump into anything.

            Hope that helps.


            --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Phil" <syh_phil@...> wrote:
            >
            > David,
            > A few questions about your very fine coolant system.
            > A water based coolant? Is there a rust inhibitor in it?
            > Could one put some gasket material on the stepper motor and cone
            > mountings to keep the coolant out?
            > Did you use a normal 1.5 inch drain with a catch screen like the one
            > sees in bathroom sinks?
            > Could you take some pictures of the plywood box, both top and bottom?
            > How did you mount the mill in the box?
            > Thanks, Phil
            >
          • Tom Hubin
            Hello David, ... There is already a hole in the bottom of the older mounts. X and Y were different parts. I swapped my x and y cones so that the holes are on
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 1, 2007
              Hello David,

              > If coolant got into the
              > mounts, I wonder if it would be as simple as drilling a couple of 1/4"
              > holes in the bottom of the mount to keep it draining out.

              There is already a hole in the bottom of the older mounts. X and Y were
              different parts. I swapped my x and y cones so that the holes are on the
              top so that I could get to the setscrews that kept coming loose on me.
              Loctite (like it says in the assembly directions) seems to have solved
              that problem. Now I have to plug or tape the top holes to keep chips
              out. One day I may tap the holes and use a screw to plug them.

              Anyway, the old cones would normally have holes on the bottom so
              drainage should be ok.

              I have noticed that the newer cones have the hole on the side so same
              cone can be used for x or y axis. This is convenient for manufacturing
              and for access but does not solve your possible drainage problem. Also,
              without a plug, the side hole is likely to collect some chips. Not as
              bad as a top hole but not as good as a bottom hole.

              > The box was just designed in my mind. I used 3/4" marine plywood. It's
              > 4 feet wide, about 22" front to back, and about 9" high which should
              > be enough to contain the spray. If not, I'll just add a little extra
              > on top. I have to make something to shield the operator still but that
              > will likely be something removable, perhaps fabric or thin rubber
              > sheet with quick attach / detach connectors to the sides.

              I often machine plates that are larger than the xy table and travel.
              Some of my plates extend a couple of inches beyond the y stepper. This
              would be a problem with your coolant as it would just run of the part
              beyond the stepper and the sink. I think I would want the sink to extend
              a few inches beyond the stepper to keep my feet dry.

              My enclosure is a plywood base with about 2 inch walls around the
              perimeter. A 4 inch hole is in the front left corner. A 4 inch hose
              drops down from the hole and into a trash bag in a bucket. This allows
              me to sweep the chips into the hole. If my enclosure was waterproof this
              4 inch drain and bucket could be for my coolant.

              To shield the operator and computer and electronics from flying chips I
              use a cut up shower curtain hanging from PVC rod.

              I mounted threaded flanges for vertical pvc tubing in the four corners.
              The four vertical pvc posts are threaded at both ends. At the top of
              each I use a 3 way joiner with the threaded portion screwed into the
              vertical post. Then unthreaded PVC, cut to length, for the top
              rectangular frame. These are just jammed into the corners.

              I bought two transparent shower curtain liners. Each liner has 12 holes.
              I cut them into 7 hole and 5 hole sections. The 7 hole sections hang
              from the front and rear rods while the 5 hole sections hang from the
              side rods. Then I cut the excess off the bottom so that each curtain
              hangs inside the short wall but does not quite touch the base.

              The curtain corners overlap inside the posts. For working or setup
              access, I slide the front curtain all the way to the left. Sometimes I
              unhook a few hangars to make that easier. Sometimes I flip the curtains
              up over the top if I need more access, like for maintenance.

              Some shower curtains or liners look transparent but are really a little
              hazy. Be sure that the curtain liner is very clear when viewing
              something a foot on the other side of the curtain.

              I got mine at the dollar store for a dollar each. Hangars were not included.

              BTW, I went with PVC and shower curtains because I took my machine to a
              couple of Cabin Fever shows and it was pretty quick and easy to
              disassemble and pack and reassemble. Also, weight for enclosure pieces
              is low so easier to lug to/from car.

              Tom Hubin
              thubin@...
            • Yahoo
              Hi Dave, I ll be interested to hear if you ever start having problems with the plywood sink developing leaks. I understand if you might be reluctant to mention
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 2, 2007
                Hi Dave,

                I'll be interested to hear if you ever start having problems with the
                plywood sink developing leaks. I understand if you might be reluctant to
                mention it if it happens, but maybe for the benefit of the group you will
                anyway. I doubt I could get by with plywood because of the temperature
                extremes here in Arizona. I suspect the joints would open up and then I
                would have a real mess.

                I've thought about a similar design using ABS plastic. I can get 4x8 sheets
                of it from a local supplier, but it's pretty expensive for 1/4" or above.
                With Tom Hubin's shower curtain idea it just might be a winner though. I'm
                wondering if you built the floor stand yourself.

                I doubt that gaskets on the motor mounts will work because I think the
                coolant comes in through the bearings. I tried sealing the joint with hot
                glue but it didn't help. Besides, you don't want anything that will
                compromise the mechanical integrity of the mount/table connection. Another
                possibility I considered is tossing the Sherline motor mounts and making an
                offset plate that mounts the motor above the flood plane, with a drive belt.
                The motor on the X slide is the biggest problem because the coolant is
                channeled directly into it by the T-slots.

                Finally, and this is probably just me being way too picky, I like the
                machine to be clean when not in use. Any place where there are relatively
                large flat surfaces mating together where coolant can accumulate and can't
                be wiped off is a source of potential trouble. I think that has been the
                most difficult nut to crack in my mental picture. I like to solve all those
                mental picture problems before I turn it into reality.
                --
                Phil Mattison
                http://www.ohmikron.com/
                Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
                To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 6:35 PM
                Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Flood coolant system


                > Don't know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass,
                > aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the
                > lead screws show no signs of rust.
                >
                > If I make a shield for the motors, I will just use some light aluminum
                > and cut it to mount on the two top stepper mounting machine screws and
                > then just bend it over top of the motor. This may be a flood coolant
                > system but that (to me) just means flooding the cutter end, not
                > creating a bath tub full of coolant. I expect some heavy spray but not
                > a major dunking.
                >
                > I cut the drain hole with a hole saw in a drill. I turned a piece of
                > aluminum on the lathe to fit that hole and the drain hose. If you put
                > a sink drain with a catch screen they you probably really would fill
                > up the "tub". A sink drain with the screen cut out might would quite
                > nicely. The top part of the flange is probably 1/8" high or so -
                > therefore you'll likely always have 1/8" of coolant sitting around the
                > drain. Not with mine. I just epoxied the tube in place. My last system
                > had about a 1/2" drain with no screen and the swarf clogged it up
                > fairly regularly. See my photo's and you will see the big ABS pipe and
                > mesh which is the filter.
                >
                > The mill base is my "Ultra Base" - one that I made from 1" x 11" x 22"
                > steel plate. I drill holes to screw it to the box but don't have plans
                > to screw it down. That thing is so bloody heavy (about 72 pounds) that
                > it's not going anywhere.
                > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/sherlinebase/sherlinebase.htm
                >
                > The top of the box is pretty well shown on the web page; the bottom
                > just looks like a piece of rectangular plywood. Essentially, I just
                > made a box of about 24"x48" with 9-10" high sides. I screwed in a
                > piece of 3/4" x 22" x 12" plywood in the center for the mill to sit
                > on. There is a 2" gap between the end of that piece and the front of
                > the box. You can see this in the second to last photo - that's where
                > the drain is. I then cut two pieces of cabinet grade 3/8" plywood for
                > the sloped bottom. The slope is not very steep. I didn't think it
                > needed to be and didn't want the X axis motor to bump into anything.
                >
                > Hope that helps.
                >
              • David Morrow
                It s not so much temperature extremes but rather the moisture extremes. Here in B.C., we have plenty of issues with that. Plywood is one of the most
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 2, 2007
                  It's not so much temperature extremes but rather the moisture
                  extremes. Here in B.C., we have plenty of issues with that. Plywood is
                  one of the most dimensionally stable wood products you could use.
                  That's why it's so often used in floors and walls in homes. The
                  veneers layers generally alternate the direction of the grain. Also,
                  the entire box is screwed together. The joints won't be moving. And
                  just to be on the safe side, all of the seems were caulked before
                  painting and before screwing together. The excess oozed out and wiped
                  off.

                  The plywood was first primed with a good exterior grade primer and
                  painted with good exterior enamel. The seams received about 3
                  additional coats of paint.

                  The sides are sloped and there are very few places for coolant to
                  accumulate and where that is possible on my tray, it will be very
                  minimal, and it can easily be brushed down the drain.

                  For the really paranoid, just lay down a couple layers of fiberglass
                  chop strand mat. Or, use a good quality marine epoxy paint. There are
                  still a lot of wood boats out there. Years ago I had a 25 year old
                  plywood boat and it was built of much thinner plywood and was before
                  the time of today's epoxy paints. Try a good marine supplier like West
                  Marine.

                  As for the X axis, I may very well be drilling drain holes to allow
                  the coolant out before it hits the motor mounts. Even with hand
                  pumping of coolant in the past I had this issue so I know what you mean.

                  --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Yahoo" <yahoo@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Dave,
                  >
                  > I'll be interested to hear if you ever start having problems with the
                  > plywood sink developing leaks. I understand if you might be reluctant to
                  > mention it if it happens, but maybe for the benefit of the group you
                  will
                  > anyway. I doubt I could get by with plywood because of the temperature
                  > extremes here in Arizona. I suspect the joints would open up and then I
                  > would have a real mess.
                  >
                  > I've thought about a similar design using ABS plastic. I can get 4x8
                  sheets
                  > of it from a local supplier, but it's pretty expensive for 1/4" or
                  above.
                  > With Tom Hubin's shower curtain idea it just might be a winner
                  though. I'm
                  > wondering if you built the floor stand yourself.
                  >
                  > I doubt that gaskets on the motor mounts will work because I think the
                  > coolant comes in through the bearings. I tried sealing the joint
                  with hot
                  > glue but it didn't help. Besides, you don't want anything that will
                  > compromise the mechanical integrity of the mount/table connection.
                  Another
                  > possibility I considered is tossing the Sherline motor mounts and
                  making an
                  > offset plate that mounts the motor above the flood plane, with a
                  drive belt.
                  > The motor on the X slide is the biggest problem because the coolant is
                  > channeled directly into it by the T-slots.
                  >
                  > Finally, and this is probably just me being way too picky, I like the
                  > machine to be clean when not in use. Any place where there are
                  relatively
                  > large flat surfaces mating together where coolant can accumulate and
                  can't
                  > be wiped off is a source of potential trouble. I think that has been the
                  > most difficult nut to crack in my mental picture. I like to solve
                  all those
                  > mental picture problems before I turn it into reality.
                  > --
                  > Phil Mattison
                  > http://www.ohmikron.com/
                  > Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
                  > To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 6:35 PM
                  > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Flood coolant system
                  >
                  >
                  > > Don't know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass,
                  > > aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the
                  > > lead screws show no signs of rust.
                  > >
                  > > If I make a shield for the motors, I will just use some light aluminum
                  > > and cut it to mount on the two top stepper mounting machine screws and
                  > > then just bend it over top of the motor. This may be a flood coolant
                  > > system but that (to me) just means flooding the cutter end, not
                  > > creating a bath tub full of coolant. I expect some heavy spray but not
                  > > a major dunking.
                  > >
                  > > I cut the drain hole with a hole saw in a drill. I turned a piece of
                  > > aluminum on the lathe to fit that hole and the drain hose. If you put
                  > > a sink drain with a catch screen they you probably really would fill
                  > > up the "tub". A sink drain with the screen cut out might would quite
                  > > nicely. The top part of the flange is probably 1/8" high or so -
                  > > therefore you'll likely always have 1/8" of coolant sitting around the
                  > > drain. Not with mine. I just epoxied the tube in place. My last system
                  > > had about a 1/2" drain with no screen and the swarf clogged it up
                  > > fairly regularly. See my photo's and you will see the big ABS pipe and
                  > > mesh which is the filter.
                  > >
                  > > The mill base is my "Ultra Base" - one that I made from 1" x 11" x 22"
                  > > steel plate. I drill holes to screw it to the box but don't have plans
                  > > to screw it down. That thing is so bloody heavy (about 72 pounds) that
                  > > it's not going anywhere.
                  > > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/sherlinebase/sherlinebase.htm
                  > >
                  > > The top of the box is pretty well shown on the web page; the bottom
                  > > just looks like a piece of rectangular plywood. Essentially, I just
                  > > made a box of about 24"x48" with 9-10" high sides. I screwed in a
                  > > piece of 3/4" x 22" x 12" plywood in the center for the mill to sit
                  > > on. There is a 2" gap between the end of that piece and the front of
                  > > the box. You can see this in the second to last photo - that's where
                  > > the drain is. I then cut two pieces of cabinet grade 3/8" plywood for
                  > > the sloped bottom. The slope is not very steep. I didn't think it
                  > > needed to be and didn't want the X axis motor to bump into anything.
                  > >
                  > > Hope that helps.
                  > >
                  >
                • David Morrow
                  I did a little followup reading on the plywood. I used marine plywood. Here is a very good link on marine plywood and its use in boat construction. Remember,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 2, 2007
                    I did a little followup reading on the plywood. I used marine plywood.
                    Here is a very good link on marine plywood and its use in boat
                    construction. Remember, the tray will not be subject to constant
                    immersion - perhaps for an hour or two at a time, but that's all.

                    http://www.boulterplywood.com/sailmag.boatworks.html



                    --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Yahoo" <yahoo@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Dave,
                    >
                    > I'll be interested to hear if you ever start having problems with the
                    > plywood sink developing leaks. I understand if you might be reluctant to
                    > mention it if it happens, but maybe for the benefit of the group you
                    will
                    > anyway. I doubt I could get by with plywood because of the temperature
                    > extremes here in Arizona. I suspect the joints would open up and then I
                    > would have a real mess.
                    >
                    > I've thought about a similar design using ABS plastic. I can get 4x8
                    sheets
                    > of it from a local supplier, but it's pretty expensive for 1/4" or
                    above.
                    > With Tom Hubin's shower curtain idea it just might be a winner
                    though. I'm
                    > wondering if you built the floor stand yourself.
                    >
                    > I doubt that gaskets on the motor mounts will work because I think the
                    > coolant comes in through the bearings. I tried sealing the joint
                    with hot
                    > glue but it didn't help. Besides, you don't want anything that will
                    > compromise the mechanical integrity of the mount/table connection.
                    Another
                    > possibility I considered is tossing the Sherline motor mounts and
                    making an
                    > offset plate that mounts the motor above the flood plane, with a
                    drive belt.
                    > The motor on the X slide is the biggest problem because the coolant is
                    > channeled directly into it by the T-slots.
                    >
                    > Finally, and this is probably just me being way too picky, I like the
                    > machine to be clean when not in use. Any place where there are
                    relatively
                    > large flat surfaces mating together where coolant can accumulate and
                    can't
                    > be wiped off is a source of potential trouble. I think that has been the
                    > most difficult nut to crack in my mental picture. I like to solve
                    all those
                    > mental picture problems before I turn it into reality.
                    > --
                    > Phil Mattison
                    > http://www.ohmikron.com/
                    > Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
                    > To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 6:35 PM
                    > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Flood coolant system
                    >
                    >
                    > > Don't know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass,
                    > > aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the
                    > > lead screws show no signs of rust.
                    > >
                    > > If I make a shield for the motors, I will just use some light aluminum
                    > > and cut it to mount on the two top stepper mounting machine screws and
                    > > then just bend it over top of the motor. This may be a flood coolant
                    > > system but that (to me) just means flooding the cutter end, not
                    > > creating a bath tub full of coolant. I expect some heavy spray but not
                    > > a major dunking.
                    > >
                    > > I cut the drain hole with a hole saw in a drill. I turned a piece of
                    > > aluminum on the lathe to fit that hole and the drain hose. If you put
                    > > a sink drain with a catch screen they you probably really would fill
                    > > up the "tub". A sink drain with the screen cut out might would quite
                    > > nicely. The top part of the flange is probably 1/8" high or so -
                    > > therefore you'll likely always have 1/8" of coolant sitting around the
                    > > drain. Not with mine. I just epoxied the tube in place. My last system
                    > > had about a 1/2" drain with no screen and the swarf clogged it up
                    > > fairly regularly. See my photo's and you will see the big ABS pipe and
                    > > mesh which is the filter.
                    > >
                    > > The mill base is my "Ultra Base" - one that I made from 1" x 11" x 22"
                    > > steel plate. I drill holes to screw it to the box but don't have plans
                    > > to screw it down. That thing is so bloody heavy (about 72 pounds) that
                    > > it's not going anywhere.
                    > > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/sherlinebase/sherlinebase.htm
                    > >
                    > > The top of the box is pretty well shown on the web page; the bottom
                    > > just looks like a piece of rectangular plywood. Essentially, I just
                    > > made a box of about 24"x48" with 9-10" high sides. I screwed in a
                    > > piece of 3/4" x 22" x 12" plywood in the center for the mill to sit
                    > > on. There is a 2" gap between the end of that piece and the front of
                    > > the box. You can see this in the second to last photo - that's where
                    > > the drain is. I then cut two pieces of cabinet grade 3/8" plywood for
                    > > the sloped bottom. The slope is not very steep. I didn't think it
                    > > needed to be and didn't want the X axis motor to bump into anything.
                    > >
                    > > Hope that helps.
                    > >
                    >
                  • David Morrow
                    Phil, I ve made a couple of small spray shield that may be of interest to you. There are more photo s at the bottom of the page.
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 11, 2007
                      Phil, I've made a couple of small spray shield that may be of interest
                      to you. There are more photo's at the bottom of the page.
                      http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm

                      Also, with regard to your concern about the coolant lying in
                      inaccessible flat areas, I don't have anything like that but, when I'm
                      finished cutting, I use my vacuum to suck up any residual coolant
                      that's too much of a pain to brush down the drain. Very effective.

                      No leaks.


                      --- In SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com, "Yahoo" <yahoo@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Dave,
                      >
                      > I'll be interested to hear if you ever start having problems with the
                      > plywood sink developing leaks. I understand if you might be reluctant to
                      > mention it if it happens, but maybe for the benefit of the group you
                      will
                      > anyway. I doubt I could get by with plywood because of the temperature
                      > extremes here in Arizona. I suspect the joints would open up and then I
                      > would have a real mess.
                      >
                      > I've thought about a similar design using ABS plastic. I can get 4x8
                      sheets
                      > of it from a local supplier, but it's pretty expensive for 1/4" or
                      above.
                      > With Tom Hubin's shower curtain idea it just might be a winner
                      though. I'm
                      > wondering if you built the floor stand yourself.
                      >
                      > I doubt that gaskets on the motor mounts will work because I think the
                      > coolant comes in through the bearings. I tried sealing the joint
                      with hot
                      > glue but it didn't help. Besides, you don't want anything that will
                      > compromise the mechanical integrity of the mount/table connection.
                      Another
                      > possibility I considered is tossing the Sherline motor mounts and
                      making an
                      > offset plate that mounts the motor above the flood plane, with a
                      drive belt.
                      > The motor on the X slide is the biggest problem because the coolant is
                      > channeled directly into it by the T-slots.
                      >
                      > Finally, and this is probably just me being way too picky, I like the
                      > machine to be clean when not in use. Any place where there are
                      relatively
                      > large flat surfaces mating together where coolant can accumulate and
                      can't
                      > be wiped off is a source of potential trouble. I think that has been the
                      > most difficult nut to crack in my mental picture. I like to solve
                      all those
                      > mental picture problems before I turn it into reality.
                      > --
                      > Phil Mattison
                      > http://www.ohmikron.com/
                      > Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
                      > To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 6:35 PM
                      > Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Flood coolant system
                      >
                      >
                      > > Don't know if there is a rust inhibitor - everything I cut is brass,
                      > > aluminum or plastic and nothing much to rust on the mill. So far the
                      > > lead screws show no signs of rust.
                      > >
                      > > If I make a shield for the motors, I will just use some light aluminum
                      > > and cut it to mount on the two top stepper mounting machine screws and
                      > > then just bend it over top of the motor. This may be a flood coolant
                      > > system but that (to me) just means flooding the cutter end, not
                      > > creating a bath tub full of coolant. I expect some heavy spray but not
                      > > a major dunking.
                      > >
                      > > I cut the drain hole with a hole saw in a drill. I turned a piece of
                      > > aluminum on the lathe to fit that hole and the drain hose. If you put
                      > > a sink drain with a catch screen they you probably really would fill
                      > > up the "tub". A sink drain with the screen cut out might would quite
                      > > nicely. The top part of the flange is probably 1/8" high or so -
                      > > therefore you'll likely always have 1/8" of coolant sitting around the
                      > > drain. Not with mine. I just epoxied the tube in place. My last system
                      > > had about a 1/2" drain with no screen and the swarf clogged it up
                      > > fairly regularly. See my photo's and you will see the big ABS pipe and
                      > > mesh which is the filter.
                      > >
                      > > The mill base is my "Ultra Base" - one that I made from 1" x 11" x 22"
                      > > steel plate. I drill holes to screw it to the box but don't have plans
                      > > to screw it down. That thing is so bloody heavy (about 72 pounds) that
                      > > it's not going anywhere.
                      > > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/sherlinebase/sherlinebase.htm
                      > >
                      > > The top of the box is pretty well shown on the web page; the bottom
                      > > just looks like a piece of rectangular plywood. Essentially, I just
                      > > made a box of about 24"x48" with 9-10" high sides. I screwed in a
                      > > piece of 3/4" x 22" x 12" plywood in the center for the mill to sit
                      > > on. There is a 2" gap between the end of that piece and the front of
                      > > the box. You can see this in the second to last photo - that's where
                      > > the drain is. I then cut two pieces of cabinet grade 3/8" plywood for
                      > > the sloped bottom. The slope is not very steep. I didn't think it
                      > > needed to be and didn't want the X axis motor to bump into anything.
                      > >
                      > > Hope that helps.
                      > >
                      >
                    • Yahoo
                      Very interesting. I guess you managed to divert enough coolant away from the X stepper so it s not a problem. I think this is the most elaborate Sherline setup
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 11, 2007
                        Very interesting. I guess you managed to divert enough coolant away from the
                        X stepper so it's not a problem. I think this is the most elaborate Sherline
                        setup I've seen. I'm envious.
                        --
                        Phil Mattison
                        http://www.ohmikron.com/
                        Motors::Drivers::Controllers::Software

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: David Morrow <morrow2002@...>
                        To: <SherlineCNC@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Sunday, November 11, 2007 12:37 PM
                        Subject: [SherlineCNC] Re: Flood coolant system


                        > Phil, I've made a couple of small spray shield that may be of interest
                        > to you. There are more photo's at the bottom of the page.
                        > http://www.ldrider.ca/cnc/coolant/coolant.htm
                        >
                        > Also, with regard to your concern about the coolant lying in
                        > inaccessible flat areas, I don't have anything like that but, when I'm
                        > finished cutting, I use my vacuum to suck up any residual coolant
                        > that's too much of a pain to brush down the drain. Very effective.
                        >
                        > No leaks.
                        >
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