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Re: Solstice Blessings

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  • yzermongol
    Happy Solstice, In traditional Siberian shamanism Solstice is not a holiday itself. Solstice marks the countdown of what is considered the most dangerous time
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 22, 2011
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      Happy Solstice,
      In traditional Siberian shamanism Solstice is not a holiday itself. Solstice marks the countdown of what is considered the most dangerous time of year- a time of little to no protection from the spirits. This time leads up to "bituun" when the spirits actually go up to the sky to receive a cleansing. The real holiday is during lunal New Year which is called Tsagaan Sar- the White Moon. This is when the spirits return, very powerful, and great shamanic work can begin for the year. So right now all over Siberia and Mongolia, people are preparing to make it through this time of low spiritual energy and looking forward to the New Year celebration that can last for several weeks. People visit relatives, exchange gifts, feast, and there are many shaman rituals to celebrate.
      I have many Wiccan and Pagan friends that celebrate Solstice. So to them and any of you who also celebrate it- Happy Solstice!
      Steve

      --- In ShamanicWays@yahoogroups.com, Nick Noble Wolf <true_dog@...> wrote:
      >
      > The Winter Solstice is upon us today. This is a special time of
      > beginnings, and for me perhaps the most holy time of the year. The
      > Winter Solstice is the time when the old year ends and all that it
      > brought is left behind as we begin the journey into the new year.
      >
      > On the Winter Solstice, the Sun Father will have traveled the furthest
      > south, making that day the shortest of the year. The longest night is
      > the one following the solstice; the day after solstice is just a little
      > bit longer as he begins his return. (For example, December 22 is
      > generally considered the solstice this year. That day will be the
      > shortest day of the year. That evening until the next morning will be
      > the longest night.)
      >
      > To those of us in the northern hemisphere, we see and feel the Sun
      > Father at his weakest on the solstice. Therefore, we men care-take him
      > on the night of the solstice to ensure his return. Men go into the
      > fields or their back yards or gardens that afternoon and make a fire
      > which might hold his spirit in honor and solace. We then watch over his
      > spirit throughout this longest night ensuring that he who gives us so
      > much does in fact return the next day. On that following sun-up, we send
      > that which we have honoured and protected all the night long back into
      > the sky. We know within our deepest self---within our soul---that if we
      > do not do this honor, that he will withdraw from us, perhaps never to
      > return. In days long ago, people might gather, men and women, around the
      > sacred fire which has been created for this honouring and care-taking,
      > the men feeding him throughout the night and the women ensuring that
      > they do. Then in the morning, when his spirit has returned to the sky,
      > the people would rekindle their hearth fires in celebration of his
      > renewed spirit.
      >
      > In this day and age I receive questions as to how one might caretake our
      > Sun Father with no place for a fire within one's home. To you, I remind
      > that First Shaman who taught us these things as a gift from Creator,
      > never said that the fire for this honouring need be large. An oil lamp
      > or even a candle is sufficient, for it is the Sun Father's spirit, his
      > essence, that we take responsibility for, and his spirit, while able to
      > encompass the whole of the Earth Mother and all her peoples, also lives
      > within all fire. So, before the sun sets on solstice, kindle a small
      > fire calling the Sun into that fire. Light your candle or lamp from that
      > fire that you might take care of it during this sacred night.
      >
      > After First Shaman had come to the people bringing the Ways to assist
      > each person in finding and fulfilling their own unique path of return to
      > Grandfather Fire/Creator, after he had taught these Ways to the people,
      > he went into the heavens where we can see him today as the Eagle of the
      > Night or north star. There he stands, ready to be of assistance to all
      > people. It is upon the night of the Winter Solstice that First Shaman's
      > spirit returns to the people, bestowing spiritual gifts upon all, that
      > our new year might be one of joy, compassion and growth. This return
      > reminds us of the Give-Away, that this coming of the new year is a time
      > to consider our friends, family and all people as we celebrate through
      > giving something from our heart.
      >
      > On behalf of the new year which follows the Winter Solstice, I suggest
      > that each person reflect during the night on that which they have
      > created during the past year. Leave behind that which does not serve you
      > and carry forth that which does into the new year, that these good
      > things might grow and blossom into your life throughout the year.
      > Celebrate the gifts you have, those you receive and the good thing you
      > have done on behalf of our Father the Sun.
      >
      > Blessings and Happy new year!
      > ~Nick
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Nick Noble Wolf
      Steve, when is the lunal new year you mention? ~N ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 23, 2011
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        Steve, when is the lunal new year you mention?

        ~N

        On 12/22/2011 3:24 PM, yzermongol wrote:
        > Happy Solstice,
        > In traditional Siberian shamanism Solstice is not a holiday itself. Solstice marks the countdown of what is considered the most dangerous time of year- a time of little to no protection from the spirits. This time leads up to "bituun" when the spirits actually go up to the sky to receive a cleansing. The real holiday is during lunal New Year which is called Tsagaan Sar- the White Moon. This is when the spirits return, very powerful, and great shamanic work can begin for the year. So right now all over Siberia and Mongolia, people are preparing to make it through this time of low spiritual energy and looking forward to the New Year celebration that can last for several weeks. People visit relatives, exchange gifts, feast, and there are many shaman rituals to celebrate.
        > I have many Wiccan and Pagan friends that celebrate Solstice. So to them and any of you who also celebrate it- Happy Solstice!
        > Steve
        >
        > --- In ShamanicWays@yahoogroups.com, Nick Noble Wolf<true_dog@...> wrote:
        >> The Winter Solstice is upon us today. This is a special time of
        >> beginnings, and for me perhaps the most holy time of the year. The
        >> Winter Solstice is the time when the old year ends and all that it
        >> brought is left behind as we begin the journey into the new year.
        >>
        >> On the Winter Solstice, the Sun Father will have traveled the furthest
        >> south, making that day the shortest of the year. The longest night is
        >> the one following the solstice; the day after solstice is just a little
        >> bit longer as he begins his return. (For example, December 22 is
        >> generally considered the solstice this year. That day will be the
        >> shortest day of the year. That evening until the next morning will be
        >> the longest night.)
        >>
        >> To those of us in the northern hemisphere, we see and feel the Sun
        >> Father at his weakest on the solstice. Therefore, we men care-take him
        >> on the night of the solstice to ensure his return. Men go into the
        >> fields or their back yards or gardens that afternoon and make a fire
        >> which might hold his spirit in honor and solace. We then watch over his
        >> spirit throughout this longest night ensuring that he who gives us so
        >> much does in fact return the next day. On that following sun-up, we send
        >> that which we have honoured and protected all the night long back into
        >> the sky. We know within our deepest self---within our soul---that if we
        >> do not do this honor, that he will withdraw from us, perhaps never to
        >> return. In days long ago, people might gather, men and women, around the
        >> sacred fire which has been created for this honouring and care-taking,
        >> the men feeding him throughout the night and the women ensuring that
        >> they do. Then in the morning, when his spirit has returned to the sky,
        >> the people would rekindle their hearth fires in celebration of his
        >> renewed spirit.
        >>
        >> In this day and age I receive questions as to how one might caretake our
        >> Sun Father with no place for a fire within one's home. To you, I remind
        >> that First Shaman who taught us these things as a gift from Creator,
        >> never said that the fire for this honouring need be large. An oil lamp
        >> or even a candle is sufficient, for it is the Sun Father's spirit, his
        >> essence, that we take responsibility for, and his spirit, while able to
        >> encompass the whole of the Earth Mother and all her peoples, also lives
        >> within all fire. So, before the sun sets on solstice, kindle a small
        >> fire calling the Sun into that fire. Light your candle or lamp from that
        >> fire that you might take care of it during this sacred night.
        >>
        >> After First Shaman had come to the people bringing the Ways to assist
        >> each person in finding and fulfilling their own unique path of return to
        >> Grandfather Fire/Creator, after he had taught these Ways to the people,
        >> he went into the heavens where we can see him today as the Eagle of the
        >> Night or north star. There he stands, ready to be of assistance to all
        >> people. It is upon the night of the Winter Solstice that First Shaman's
        >> spirit returns to the people, bestowing spiritual gifts upon all, that
        >> our new year might be one of joy, compassion and growth. This return
        >> reminds us of the Give-Away, that this coming of the new year is a time
        >> to consider our friends, family and all people as we celebrate through
        >> giving something from our heart.
        >>
        >> On behalf of the new year which follows the Winter Solstice, I suggest
        >> that each person reflect during the night on that which they have
        >> created during the past year. Leave behind that which does not serve you
        >> and carry forth that which does into the new year, that these good
        >> things might grow and blossom into your life throughout the year.
        >> Celebrate the gifts you have, those you receive and the good thing you
        >> have done on behalf of our Father the Sun.
        >>
        >> Blessings and Happy new year!
        >> ~Nick
        >>
        >>
        >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
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        >
        >
        >
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • yzermongol
        LOL. That is a typo. Lunar (not Lunal) New Year is what I meant to say. This occurs about two months after solstice- falling on a different day each year. I
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 23, 2011
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          LOL. That is a typo. Lunar (not Lunal) New Year is what I meant to say. This occurs about two months after solstice- falling on a different day each year. I think it is interesting how the same time of year can mean such different things to different peoples. Many of the differences come from agrarian vs hunter/gatherer nomad societies. If you are planting crops, your year's rhythm is in tune with that. For nomads, it is in tune with the animals.
          Another common difference I see between many traditions is the view of what the sun and moon are compared to masculine and feminine. Several traditions that I have heard of see the sun as masculine and the moon as feminine. In Siberian Shamanism it is reversed. The moon represents the male. Males are not always around camp as they often leave for hunting or war- just as the moon comes and goes. The sun is considered feminine- constant, embracing, and life-giving.
          Anyhow, no matter what your traditions are- happy holidays to all.
          Steve

          --- In ShamanicWays@yahoogroups.com, Nick Noble Wolf <true_dog@...> wrote:
          >
          > Steve, when is the lunal new year you mention?
          >
          > ~N
          >
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