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Re: best post-apocalyptic novels?

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  • Bennett Stuckless
    Haven t been here in ages, but happened to stop by tonight and this caught my eye because we had a recent thread on post-apocalyptic ficton on another BB and
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 2, 2006
      Haven't been here in ages, but happened to stop by tonight and this
      caught my eye because we had a recent thread on post-apocalyptic
      ficton on another BB and because I was reading the sample chapters
      for Steve Stirling's new book last night ...

      Thanks for mentioning *Shreds of Humanity*; I've added it to my want-
      to-read list.

      I would put Kim Harrison, Kelley Armstrong and Laurell K. Hamilton in
      Supernatural Fantasy. While post-apolcalyptic may sometimes have
      horror/fantasy elements (like Robert McCammon's *Swan Song*), it's
      usually pure science fiction.

      You've probably read the classics: *Earth Abides* -- George R.
      Stewart [1949], *Daybreak 2250 A.D.* -- Andre Norton [1952]; *The
      Long Tomorrow* -- Leigh Brackett [1955], *The Chrysalids* -- John
      Wyndham [1955}, *Alas, Babylon* -- Pat Frank [1959], *A Boy and His
      Dog* -- Harlan Ellison [1975].

      Since you enjoyed *Hammerfall* so much, you should definitely read
      another Niven/Pournelle collaboration: *Footfall*.

      Two more authors I'm sure you'll enjoy are S.M. Stirling and Sean
      McMullen. Stirling's series started with *Dies the Fire* in 2004 &
      *The Lord Protector's War* in 2005, and continues with *A Meeting at
      Corvallis* this fall. After "The Change", electricity and fast
      combustion (gunpowder) no longer work ... McMullen's trilogy,
      *Souls in the Great Machine*, *The Miocene Arrow* and *Eyes of the
      Calculor*, has a truly original disaster! "The Call" takes over the
      minds of all large mammals and forces them to walk toward the sea,
      either dying of exhaustion on the way or finally throwing themselves
      in ... Humans survived in callhavens where it did not reach, and have
      spread back into areas where the call comes once or twice a day ...

      I also recommend *Dammnation Alley* -- Roger Zelazny and *The
      Postman* -- David Brin (both much better than the movies!); *A Gift
      Upon the Shore* -- M.K. Wren, *Parable of the Sower* -- Octavia
      Butler, *No Blade of Grass* -- John Christopher, *Bone Dance* -- Emma
      Bull, *Dinner at Deviant's Palace* -- Tim Powers and *Walk to the End
      of the World* -- Suzy McKee Charnas

      As you can tell, I also like talking about books, especially SF and
      fantasy!

      Bee in Toronto


      --- In ShadowRealms@yahoogroups.com, "artyfields" <armyxprt@...>
      wrote:
      >> I guess now that I finished Shreds of Humanity, I have to place it
      at the top of my favorites but sort of in an equal billing with
      Lucifer's Hammer ... the Hammer dwells more on the direct
      geographical effects and the stories of how people escape from LA.
      In both novels, the most interesting part to me is how the survivors
      manage to find food, shelter, protect themselves and form groups that
      plan for the new future ... up. Sorry to go on, I just like talking
      about books. -Art
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