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Dialysis In Malaysia & China Cheaper Than PAP NKF's "Subsidy"

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  • DAKSHINA MURTHY
    From: DAKSHINA MURTHY To: Sg_Review Dialysis In Malaysia & China Cheaper Than PAP NKF s Subsidy Below is a telling tale; 1) Malaysia s NKF can offer dialysis
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 31, 2005
      From: DAKSHINA MURTHY
      To: Sg_Review
      Dialysis In Malaysia & China Cheaper Than PAP NKF's "Subsidy"

      Below is a telling tale;

      1) Malaysia's NKF can offer dialysis for 60 ringgit($26) per session

      2) In Canada, dialysis treatment is free for residents and citizens.
      The dialysis centres are remarkably clean, very spacious and well
      equipped. The medical staff are well trained and extremely friendly.
      Hot tea, coffee or water and biscuits are served to patients every
      hour, free of charge. All questions are answered in great detail and
      with patience.

      3) In Guangzhou, China, the cost of dialysis for foreigners is a flat
      full fee of 400 yuan (S$83) per treatment. The Chinese dialysis
      centres are huge and surprisingly clean. They are well equipped with
      up-to-date imported dialysis machines, the same as those used in
      Singapore, if not better. Most of their medical staff are friendly
      and helpful.

      4) In Singapore, the cost of dialysis for citizens at private centres
      ranges from $100 to $165 AFTER subsidy.

      Million Dollar Ministers = Million Dollar costs.

      http://forums.delphiforums.com/sammyboymod/messages/?msg=89390.1

      Even Dialysis in China is cheaper then PAP's NKF.

      Forum: the Sammyboy.com's Alfresco Coffee Hub Forum
      Subject: NKF: The BIGGEST BIGGEST Question!!!
      From: (MONEYHELP234)
      To: (ALL)
      DateTime: 30/12/2005 22:54:46

      I have one VERY BIG QUESTION that has not been answer - can the govt,
      NKF, KDF, Gerald EE...or SOMEBODY .....please ANSWER this BIG
      QUESTION!!!!

      The question is:
      How come NKF Malaysia can offer dialysis for 60 ringgit($26) per
      session & NKF has to charge $164?! The difference is 6 times! One
      patient in Singapore can pay for 6 patients in Malaysia. We all know
      our cost is expensive ...BUT THIS IS OUTRAGEOUS!!!!!!!

      Million Dollar Ministers = Million Dollar costs.

      NKF Malaysia : http://www.nkf.org.my/01about_nkf.htm

      HISTORY
      -
      From our humble beginnings when we were first registered in 1969, the National Kidney Foundation of Malaysia has striven to raise the standard of care given to kidney failure patients and others suffering from various kidney related diseases.
      -
      In 1993, we opened our first dialysis centre at Jalan Hang Likeu, and since then, the NKF has expanded its role from being purely a provider of dialysis treatment, to becoming a one-stop centre for all matters involving the kidneys.

      TRAINING
      -
      Besides providing affordable dialysis treatment for kidney patients, the NKF has designed and developed the syllabus for Malaysia’s only specialised training course for Dialysis Assistants, thereby raising the standard of care given to kidney patients.
      -
      Dialysis Assistants are the men and women care givers who help staff nurses in providing on-the-ground assistance to kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis. They are seconded for training by their employers, who are, besides others, private hospitals and clinics and non-governmental and charitable organisations that run dialysis centres.
      -
      Currently, the NKF trains and certifies Dialysis Assistants from throughout the country, who, upon completing their three-month course, receives a Certificate of Competency as Dialysis Assistants.
      -
      For more information on the course and to fill out an application form, please go to Training > Requirements.

      PUBLIC EDUCATION
      -
      National development and economic wealth have raised our standard of living and changed our lifestyles. Dining out and eating excessively, coupled with a lack of exercise and the demands of most modern jobs have altered our diets from what they used to be 20 or 30 years ago.
      -
      Even fast food, with its high salt and fat content, has penetrated the rural towns and villages with the result that rural dwellers are now experiencing a rise in the incidents of diabetes and hypertension – once considered “rich man’s diseases”.
      -
      Unfortunately, these two diseases are not just a growing problem in Malaysia, but are among the most common contributors to end stage kidney failure. In fact, 48% of kidney failure patients are diabetics and 5% hypertension sufferers.
      -
      To help overcome this, the NKF plays a major role in educating the public on the prevention and management of kidney diseases. This role is one of the most important functions of the NKF, because prevention is always better than cure.
      -
      As its name suggests, the Public Education Department was set up specifically to educate the public on the causes, prevention and management of kidney diseases. Currently, health talks and screening, public forums and counselling clinics are conducted on a regular basis, not just in the towns and cities throughout Malaysia, but in the rural areas as well.
      -
      We are also reaching the public through the mass media, including radio, television, newspapers and magazines, through which the NKF is fulfilling our social responsibility of giving out information on all aspects of prevention and management of kidney diseases.
      -
      For further information on the Public Education Department, please click on Public Education.

      WELFARE
      -
      Many patients experience trauma, shock and disillusionment when they are first told that they have end-stage kidney failure, and that they need dialysis treatment or a kidney transplant to continue living.
      -
      These patients view the future as bleak and uncertain, and one which demands lifelong expenditure for medical and dialysis treatment.
      -
      But thanks to the NKF’s Welfare Department, help is just a telephone call away. Our welfare officers are on hand to counsel and help patients overcome their initial depression, and put them on track to full psychological recovery.
      -
      And that’s not all. Many kidney failure patients are unemployed and unable to hold regular jobs because, unless they undergo a successful kidney transplant, they need dialysis treatments 13 times a month at four hours per session, which may interfere with their normal working lives.
      -
      Hence, the Welfare Department has also instituted various job placement and financial assistance schemes to help these patients earn a living through self-employment.
      -
      For more information on the services provided by the Welfare Department, please click on Welfare.

      FUNDRAISING
      -
      Like any organisation, what more a charitable, not-for-profit one such as the NKF, fundraising is an important component.
      -
      All our patients come from the lower income group, and cannot afford dialysis treatment at private medical facilities, so the NKF subsidises the cost of their lifesaving dialysis treatments.
      -
      What this means is that this year alone, the NKF needs to raise some RM1.8 million to subsidise the dialysis treatment cost for our 700 patients who seek treatment at our 18 dialysis centres throughout the country. We cannot do it alone, and we need your help.
      -
      Thanks to money raised from corporations and the public through donations, grants and other forms of financial support, we are able to subsidise the treatment cost for our dialysis patients.
      -
      The result is that our patients only pay a nominal RM60 per session as compared to charges of between RM150 and RM250 at private medical facilities.
      -
      For more information on how you can donate to the NKF, please visit Fundraising.


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      From: "sg_review" <sg_review@...>
      Date: Thu Dec 15, 2005 4:27 am
      Subject: NKF Numbers Dont Add Up - Legitmised Corruption sg_review

      http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/forum/story/0,5562,358980,00.html?

      Dec 15, 2005

      Be more realistic in assessing NKF reserves

      UPON reading the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) report by interim
      chairman Gerard Ee, it appears that the sums do not add up.

      It was stated that the present reserves of $206 million would last
      only 4.5 years in the worst-case scenario. There seems to be some
      calculation error.

      The sum of $206 million, deposited in a bank account earning annual
      interest of 3.8 per cent, would garner $7,828,000. This plus the
      government subsidy of $4 million would give NKF an annual income of
      $11,828,000, without contributions from donations.

      Presently NKF has 1,800 dialysis patients that it subsidises on
      average $70 per treatment. That subsidy would amount to $19,656,000 a
      year as each patient undergoes three sessions per week. That would
      leave a shortfall of $7,828,000 per year that has to come from NKF
      reserves. Dividing the reserves of $206 million by the shortfall of
      $7.8 million, it would take about 26 years for the reserves to run
      out.

      It appears that the counsel for The Straits Times in its defence of
      the lawsuit filed by NKF was nearer to the truth when he said that
      the reserves would last 30 years.

      The new NKF management has an obligation to present to the public,
      and especially to renal patients, a more realistic assessment of the
      situation. By singing the same T.T. Durai worst-case-scenario song
      with a new choir, it is unlikely to gain public confidence.

      Although donations have dropped significantly from more than $2
      million to $1.7 million a month, it is still a sizeable amount.

      The $20.4 million in annual donations is more than enough to cover
      the $19,656,000 needed as subsidies for dialysis treatment for 1,800
      patients without touching the reserves of $206 million, whose
      interest could cover inflation or expansion programmes.

      I am a renal patient and have received dialysis treatment in Canada,
      China and Singapore.

      In Canada, dialysis treatment is free for residents and citizens. The
      dialysis centres are remarkably clean, very spacious and well
      equipped. The medical staff are well trained and extremely friendly.
      Hot tea, coffee or water and biscuits are served to patients every
      hour, free of charge. All questions are answered in great detail and
      with patience.

      In Guangzhou, China, the cost of dialysis for foreigners is a flat
      full fee of 400 yuan (S$83) per treatment. The Chinese dialysis
      centres are huge and surprisingly clean. They are well equipped with
      up-to-date imported dialysis machines, the same as those used in
      Singapore, if not better. Most of their medical staff are friendly
      and helpful.

      In Singapore, the cost of dialysis for citizens at private centres
      ranges from $100 to $150 after subsidy. The centres are clean but
      patients have to provide their own blankets.

      The medical staff are busy and have seemingly tight schedules and
      little time for explanations. Questions are often frowned upon and
      answers given are short and ambiguous. The typical answer is that, in
      Singapore, things are done differently. One cannot help but wonder
      why things are done differently when the dialysis machines and
      protocols are similar.

      I have one simple request. Tell us how long the NKF reserves will
      last if a realistic and practical approach is adopted in managing it.

      As renal patients, we accept the fact that our lives are shorter.

      Our lives need not be shortened further by unrealistic scenarios that
      would never happen. Please do away with the ambiguous language and
      ridiculous worst-case scenarios if public confidence is to be
      restored.

      Cheong Wing Lee
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