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Re: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay

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  • clydol@comcast.net
    ... From: ELAINE PROCIDA To: Seniormemoirs@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 19:48:17 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay Hello Everyone: I
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 23, 2009
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      ----- Original Message -----

      From: ELAINE PROCIDA

      To: Seniormemoirs@yahoogroups.com

      Sent: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 19:48:17 +0000 (UTC)

      Subject: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay





























          


                  

      Hello Everyone:


       


      I have not yet seen anyone posting their essay to this list but I am posting mine. 


       


       


      WHAT YOU DO WHEN YOU DO NOTHING

      Barnes & Nobles

      January 21, 2009

      Elaine Procida

       

      I used to feel guilty about all the time I spent doing nothing, but then I came upon an article (TIME JANUARY 29, 2007) that asks: “What are you doing when you aren’t doing anything at all?” It explains that MRI scans have shown it is only when we are doing nothing that our brains are most active.  The dark areas that are inactive when we are busy doing something suddenly jump into action when the other areas quiet down. And what it does, mostly is time travel.  As the article states: “We are a race of time travelers, unfettered by chronology and capable of visiting the future or revisiting the past whenever we wish.  If our neural time machines are damaged by illness, age or accident, we may become trapped in the present.”



       

      My life prior to being a senior consisted of “doing something.”  I was usually up by 5:00 AM and catching the bus to work at 6:45 to put in my eight-hour day at the office.  On the bus, I read the newspaper; on my lunch hour I usually managed a long walk and grabbed a bite to eat.  On the way home, I read a book or engaged in conversation with a seatmate.  Weekends were for catching up with cleaning, and shopping.  But I still seemed to have no problem finding time for whatever hobby or endeavor I was pursuing at the time.  But all things must come to an end and I reached the age of   “doing nothing” otherwise known as the retirement years.

       

      No longer needing to get up at 5:00 AM I am up whenever I feel like it.  After breakfast and getting dressed, my next stop is the calendar to see what adventures might be on tap.  If it is a Monday, there are sure to be some fun things including a Wii game with my fellow "do-nothing retirees."   The remainder of the week, what might be calling me are:  an exercise class, our resident’s council meeting, or a BOD meeting of our Tenants Association.  Other things on my “to do” list include, getting rid of stuff, update picture album, check out retirement communities “just in case.”  Then there are various writing groups that I would not miss for anything, and it is necessary to think of what I will

      write.  I also do my daily walking, which usually runs from forty-five to ninety minutes. 


       

      In between I must remember to contact friends that I have not heard from in a while, Then my computer calls for my attention and I must go into it's brain and try to clean up stuff there that does not seem to want to go anyplace.  Even when I delete something I often find it has moved to a new place.  Finances also take time; such as trying to determine which investments are most likely to do what they are supposed to do or arguing with advisors who will not accept my “I prefer CD’s” logic.  Shredding all the unwanted daily mail takes a certain amount of time including all the requests to try to get me to part with my hard-saved funds.  Doing nothing does not excuse me from the usual cleaning and shopping, although I admit I am more likely to hide the dust than when I

      was busy doing something.  And, the best for the last, there are all the medical / dental appointments that clutter my calendar and seem to go with “the retirement years.”




       

      When someone complains “Seniors Do Nothing” I will tell them:  “That is when the important things in life get done.”   


       


       



          
        



          

          

          

          





         Elaine
    • Pete Hunter
      Dear Elaine,    How are you on this glorious bright and nippy day?   I loved your essay, I think you covered the do-nothing-times very well.   I just
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 24, 2009
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        Dear Elaine, 
         
        How are you on this glorious bright and nippy day?
         
        I loved your essay, I think you covered the do-nothing-times very well.
         
        I just finished marking my activity dates on my calender for what's left of January and the beginning of February. Upon reviewing my 2008 calender, it looks like a Pentagon, GPS targeted area somewhere in Afghanistan. I even color coded the dates to indicate their genre ... medical, writer's meeting, social appointments and ... what-ever?
         
        In addition, I have posted large, hand drawn reminder signs, such as, "FASTING" at strategic places around the house where I most commingly spend my time as the day and evening progresses ... when I'm doing nothing.
         
        My  computer monitor is framed with stick-on-notes of all sorts of reminders, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and quotes that I like to use.
        The best way to describe my computer enclave is, "Controlled Chaos" I'm the only one who knows what the scribblings mean and where to find them. The DaVinci Code ? Ha! Don't make me laugh ... mere amateurs at best.
         
        Again, I think you nailed it.
         
        See you at the next meeting in February.
         
        PETE HUNTER
         
         
         
         
         
        --- On Fri, 1/23/09, clydol@... <clydol@...> wrote:
        From: clydol@... <clydol@...>
        Subject: Re: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay
        To: Seniormemoirs@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, January 23, 2009, 8:36 AM



        ----- Original Message -----

        From: ELAINE PROCIDA

        To: Seniormemoirs@ yahoogroups. com

        Sent: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 19:48:17 +0000 (UTC)

        Subject: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay





























            


                    
        Hello Everyone:


         


        I have not yet seen anyone posting their essay to this list but I am posting mine. 


         


         


        WHAT YOU DO WHEN YOU DO NOTHING

        Barnes & Nobles

        January 21, 2009

        Elaine Procida

         

        I used to feel guilty about all the time I spent doing nothing, but then I came upon an article (TIME JANUARY 29, 2007) that asks: “What are you doing when you aren’t doing anything at all?” It explains that MRI scans have shown it is only when we are doing nothing that our brains are most active.  The dark areas that are inactive when we are busy doing something suddenly jump into action when the other areas quiet down. And what it does, mostly is time travel.  As the article states: “We are a race of time travelers, unfettered by chronology and capable of visiting the future or revisiting the past whenever we wish.  If our neural time machines are damaged by illness, age or accident, we may become trapped in the present.”



         

        My life prior to being a senior consisted of “doing something.”  I was usually up by 5:00 AM and catching the bus to work at 6:45 to put in my eight-hour day at the office.  On the bus, I read the newspaper; on my lunch hour I usually managed a long walk and grabbed a bite to eat.  On the way home, I read a book or engaged in conversation with a seatmate.  Weekends were for catching up with cleaning, and shopping.  But I still seemed to have no problem finding time for whatever hobby or endeavor I was pursuing at the time.  But all things must come to an end and I reached the age of   “doing nothing” otherwise known as the retirement years.

         

        No longer needing to get up at 5:00 AM I am up whenever I feel like it.  After breakfast and getting dressed, my next stop is the calendar to see what adventures might be on tap.  If it is a Monday, there are sure to be some fun things including a Wii game with my fellow "do-nothing retirees."   The remainder of the week, what might be calling me are:  an exercise class, our resident’s council meeting, or a BOD meeting of our Tenants Association.  Other things on my “to do” list include, getting rid of stuff, update picture album, check out retirement communities “just in case.”  Then there are various writing groups that I would not miss for anything, and it is necessary to think of what I will

        write.  I also do my daily walking, which usually runs from forty-five to ninety minutes. 


         

        In between I must remember to contact friends that I have not heard from in a while, Then my computer calls for my attention and I must go into it's brain and try to clean up stuff there that does not seem to want to go anyplace.  Even when I delete something I often find it has moved to a new place.  Finances also take time; such as trying to determine which investments are most likely to do what they are supposed to do or arguing with advisors who will not accept my “I prefer CD’s” logic.  Shredding all the unwanted daily mail takes a certain amount of time including all the requests to try to get me to part with my hard-saved funds.  Doing nothing does not excuse me from the usual cleaning and shopping, although I admit I am more likely to hide the dust than when I

        was busy doing something.  And, the best for the last, there are all the medical / dental appointments that clutter my calendar and seem to go with “the retirement years.”




         

        When someone complains “Seniors Do Nothing” I will tell them:  “That is when the important things in life get done.”   


         


         



              



            

            

            

            





           Elaine
      • ELAINE PROCIDA
        Hi Pete:   Glad you liked the essay.  I think all of them were just great.    Elaine ... From: Pete Hunter Subject: Re:
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 25, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Pete:
           
          Glad you liked the essay.  I think all of them were just great. 
           
          Elaine

          --- On Sat, 1/24/09, Pete Hunter <brokenpen99@...> wrote:
          From: Pete Hunter <brokenpen99@...>
          Subject: Re: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay
          To: Seniormemoirs@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, January 24, 2009, 2:53 PM

          Dear Elaine, 
           
          How are you on this glorious bright and nippy day?
           
          I loved your essay, I think you covered the do-nothing-times very well.
           
          I just finished marking my activity dates on my calender for what's left of January and the beginning of February. Upon reviewing my 2008 calender, it looks like a Pentagon, GPS targeted area somewhere in Afghanistan. I even color coded the dates to indicate their genre ... medical, writer's meeting, social appointments and ... what-ever?
           
          In addition, I have posted large, hand drawn reminder signs, such as, "FASTING" at strategic places around the house where I most commingly spend my time as the day and evening progresses ... when I'm doing nothing.
           
          My  computer monitor is framed with stick-on-notes of all sorts of reminders, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and quotes that I like to use.
          The best way to describe my computer enclave is, "Controlled Chaos" I'm the only one who knows what the scribblings mean and where to find them. The DaVinci Code ? Ha! Don't make me laugh ... mere amateurs at best.
           
          Again, I think you nailed it.
           
          See you at the next meeting in February.
           
          PETE HUNTER
           
           
           
           
           
          --- On Fri, 1/23/09, clydol@comcast. net <clydol@comcast. net> wrote:
          From: clydol@comcast. net <clydol@comcast. net>
          Subject: Re: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay
          To: Seniormemoirs@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Friday, January 23, 2009, 8:36 AM



          ----- Original Message -----

          From: ELAINE PROCIDA

          To: Seniormemoirs@ yahoogroups. com

          Sent: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 19:48:17 +0000 (UTC)

          Subject: [Seniormemoirs] Elaine Essay





























              


                      
          Hello Everyone:


           


          I have not yet seen anyone posting their essay to this list but I am posting mine. 


           


           


          WHAT YOU DO WHEN YOU DO NOTHING

          Barnes & Nobles

          January 21, 2009

          Elaine Procida

           

          I used to feel guilty about all the time I spent doing nothing, but then I came upon an article (TIME JANUARY 29, 2007) that asks: “What are you doing when you aren’t doing anything at all?” It explains that MRI scans have shown it is only when we are doing nothing that our brains are most active.  The dark areas that are inactive when we are busy doing something suddenly jump into action when the other areas quiet down. And what it does, mostly is time travel.  As the article states: “We are a race of time travelers, unfettered by chronology and capable of visiting the future or revisiting the past whenever we wish.  If our neural time machines are damaged by illness, age or accident, we may become trapped in the present.”



           

          My life prior to being a senior consisted of “doing something.”  I was usually up by 5:00 AM and catching the bus to work at 6:45 to put in my eight-hour day at the office.  On the bus, I read the newspaper; on my lunch hour I usually managed a long walk and grabbed a bite to eat.  On the way home, I read a book or engaged in conversation with a seatmate.  Weekends were for catching up with cleaning, and shopping.  But I still seemed to have no problem finding time for whatever hobby or endeavor I was pursuing at the time.  But all things must come to an end and I reached the age of   “doing nothing” otherwise known as the retirement years.

           

          No longer needing to get up at 5:00 AM I am up whenever I feel like it.  After breakfast and getting dressed, my next stop is the calendar to see what adventures might be on tap.  If it is a Monday, there are sure to be some fun things including a Wii game with my fellow "do-nothing retirees."   The remainder of the week, what might be calling me are:  an exercise class, our resident’s council meeting, or a BOD meeting of our Tenants Association.  Other things on my “to do” list include, getting rid of stuff, update picture album, check out retirement communities “just in case.”  Then there are various writing groups that I would not miss for anything, and it is necessary to think of what I will

          write.  I also do my daily walking, which usually runs from forty-five to ninety minutes. 


           

          In between I must remember to contact friends that I have not heard from in a while, Then my computer calls for my attention and I must go into it's brain and try to clean up stuff there that does not seem to want to go anyplace.  Even when I delete something I often find it has moved to a new place.  Finances also take time; such as trying to determine which investments are most likely to do what they are supposed to do or arguing with advisors who will not accept my “I prefer CD’s” logic.  Shredding all the unwanted daily mail takes a certain amount of time including all the requests to try to get me to part with my hard-saved funds.  Doing nothing does not excuse me from the usual cleaning and shopping, although I admit I am more likely to hide the dust than when I

          was busy doing something.  And, the best for the last, there are all the medical / dental appointments that clutter my calendar and seem to go with “the retirement years.”




           

          When someone complains “Seniors Do Nothing” I will tell them:  “That is when the important things in life get done.”   


           


           



              
            



              

              

              

              





             Elaine

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