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Tektronix 466 or 468

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  • Doug Leppard
    Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at these and the Tektronix 76x3 series. I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes.
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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      Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
      these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.

      I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
      them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.

      Doug
    • Dan Creagan
      I have a 466 that I got through Ebay two years ago. It is complete and total overkill for most of what we do in hobby robotics. So, in real terms, it is just
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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        I have a 466 that I got through Ebay two years ago. It is complete and total
        overkill for most of what we do in hobby robotics. So, in real terms, it is
        just about right. ;-}

        I would highly recommend it. Try to get it from someone who can show
        calibration before you buy, etc.

        Dan

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Doug Leppard [mailto:Doug.Leppard@...]
        Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 8:36 AM
        To: seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468


        Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
        these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.

        I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
        them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.

        Doug

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Brian Short
        I am partial to the 465 and 466 models - the 466 has the storage facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope. Currently, I have the 466, but actually I was
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          I am partial to the '465 and 466 models - the 466 has the
          "storage" facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope.

          Currently, I have the '466, but actually I was looking for a
          good '465 or '465B at the time.

          I spent 6 years in the Navy prior to College/Grad School
          as a Data Systems Tech and always had a 465 at the
          ready. Some procedures would require the 466 and it
          was available as needed.

          These are 100MHz dual trace, delayed sweep scopes
          and are of high quality, though they have been around
          awhile. In my mind, they are a great buy!

          I can't speak for the surplus market of later model units.

          Also, I'd only purchase one through a reputable test
          equipment dealer (like in Nuts N Volts). I purchased
          a couple at a defense contractor auction one time and
          it is possible for them to have problems not worth the
          expense of fixing or to have ancient calibration records.

          Anyway, my advice, get a 465b - you'll love it.

          My 0.02USD, Brian

          At 09:35 AM 9/1/01 -0400, you wrote:
          >Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
          >these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
          >
          >I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
          >them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
          >
          >Doug

          --
          k7on@... >or< http://www.qsl.net/k7on/
          --
          The Boulder Pledge by Roger Ebert, University of Colorado :

          Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to
          me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. Nor will I
          forward chain letters, petitions, mass mailings, or virus warnings
          to large numbers of others. This is my contribution to the survival
          of the online community.
          --
        • Dan Creagan
          Computer power supplies are switched and require a load. Has anyone configured one as a bench supply, and if so, what are the tricks and traps? If I build a
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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            Computer power supplies are switched and require a load. Has anyone
            configured one as a bench supply, and if so, what are the tricks and traps?
            If I build a box, put a constant load on the different outputs, and use it
            for electronics, do I need to provide any other filtering? What would be an
            appropriate load?

            Links that I've found:

            http://server.redden.on.ca/~tcarc/switcher.html This looks like it would
            work for our hobby. Anyone done this?

            I know I can just do this and experiment, but I want to get in the ballpark
            first time ... honeydo's in the new house won't let me spend a lot of time
            experimenting (at least initially)!

            Dan

            PS: I'm grown up and understand that voltage hurts. No need for safety
            warnings unless, of course, you try this yourself. In which case, remember -
            voltage hurts. There are several hundred DC volts inside a computer power
            supply.



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Brian Short [mailto:k7on@...]
            Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 9:14 AM
            To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468


            I am partial to the '465 and 466 models - the 466 has the
            "storage" facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope.

            Currently, I have the '466, but actually I was looking for a
            good '465 or '465B at the time.

            I spent 6 years in the Navy prior to College/Grad School
            as a Data Systems Tech and always had a 465 at the
            ready. Some procedures would require the 466 and it
            was available as needed.

            These are 100MHz dual trace, delayed sweep scopes
            and are of high quality, though they have been around
            awhile. In my mind, they are a great buy!

            I can't speak for the surplus market of later model units.

            Also, I'd only purchase one through a reputable test
            equipment dealer (like in Nuts N Volts). I purchased
            a couple at a defense contractor auction one time and
            it is possible for them to have problems not worth the
            expense of fixing or to have ancient calibration records.

            Anyway, my advice, get a 465b - you'll love it.

            My 0.02USD, Brian

            At 09:35 AM 9/1/01 -0400, you wrote:
            >Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
            >these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
            >
            >I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
            >them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
            >
            >Doug

            --
            k7on@... >or< http://www.qsl.net/k7on/
            --
            The Boulder Pledge by Roger Ebert, University of Colorado :

            Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to
            me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. Nor will I
            forward chain letters, petitions, mass mailings, or virus warnings
            to large numbers of others. This is my contribution to the survival
            of the online community.
            --


            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com



            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Larry Barello
            I have a 465 and it is pretty nice. I wouldn t say it is overkill if you are using any modern MCU and are trying to puzzle out high speed events while
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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              I have a 465 and it is pretty nice. I wouldn't say it is overkill if
              you are using any modern MCU and are trying to puzzle out high speed
              events while clocking data in from a Sharp sensor, or traffic to/from
              an SPI peripheral.

              I sure wouldn't mind a DSO - as said earlier, being able to capture a
              single event of several hundred or thousand bits, would be great for
              debugging.


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Dan Creagan" <dcreagan@...>
              To: "Doug Leppard" <Doug.Leppard@...>;
              <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 7:01 AM
              Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468


              > I have a 466 that I got through Ebay two years ago. It is complete
              and total
              > overkill for most of what we do in hobby robotics. So, in real
              terms, it is
              > just about right. ;-}
              >
              > I would highly recommend it. Try to get it from someone who can
              show
              > calibration before you buy, etc.
            • Bob Dyer
              Doug, I ve got a 466, and I like it. The storage feature is great for seeing intermittent, short duration pulses - kind of a poor man s DSO for that task. I ve
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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                Doug,

                I've got a 466, and I like it. The storage feature is great for seeing
                intermittent, short duration pulses - kind of a poor man's DSO for that
                task. I've used this "style" of scope for years. The delayed timing
                features, and the ability to expand a portion of the trace have also proved
                valuable. My only current complaint has been finding the right probes,
                though I haven't spent much time looking.

                If you've got specific questions, let me know. Don't know anything about the
                76x3 series so I can't help you compare.

                Bob

                -------------------------
                Consider Carefully... Act Boldly!

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Doug Leppard [mailto:Doug.Leppard@...]

                Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
                these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.

                I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
                them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
              • Kenneth Maxon
                Tektronix digital storage scopes are really great for finding complex problems as you can use them for debugging and diagnosing complex communications
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 1, 2001
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                  Tektronix digital storage scopes are really great for finding complex
                  problems as you can use them for debugging and diagnosing complex
                  communications problems. Think about RS232 communications or I2C going back
                  and fourth on two wires. Would it be nice for a transaction to take place
                  in real time. Then when you are ready you can "scroll" back throught the
                  "data" off line slowly. I use a TDS460 with several add in cards. It was
                  invaluable when developing my laser range finder system to diagnose the CPLD
                  functions real time against the NTSC video which the scope understands and
                  can sync to.

                  -Kenneth
                  (Unit 3's in trouble and it's scared out of its wits) -Geddy Lee
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Doug Leppard" <Doug.Leppard@...>
                  To: <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 6:35 AM
                  Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468


                  > Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
                  > these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
                  >
                  > I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
                  > them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
                  >
                  > Doug
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Benoit Provost
                  I also have a switching power supply that I wanted to use as a bench-top, general purpose power supply. Somebody suggested to add a load to it, but I could
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 2, 2001
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I also have a switching power supply that I wanted to use as a bench-top,
                    general purpose power supply. Somebody suggested to add a load to it, but I
                    could not keep it stable. Maybe the load has to be quite near the value for
                    which the power supply was designed? When I turn on and off my application
                    load repeatedly, the power-supply goes in power-protect and shuts off.

                    Benoit

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Dan Creagan" <dcreagan@...>
                    To: <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 8:05 AM
                    Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Bench Power Supply


                    >
                    > Computer power supplies are switched and require a load. Has anyone
                    > configured one as a bench supply, and if so, what are the tricks and
                    traps?
                    > If I build a box, put a constant load on the different outputs, and use it
                    > for electronics, do I need to provide any other filtering? What would be
                    an
                    > appropriate load?
                    >
                    > Links that I've found:
                    >
                    > http://server.redden.on.ca/~tcarc/switcher.html This looks like it would
                    > work for our hobby. Anyone done this?
                    >
                    > I know I can just do this and experiment, but I want to get in the
                    ballpark
                    > first time ... honeydo's in the new house won't let me spend a lot of time
                    > experimenting (at least initially)!
                    >
                    > Dan
                    >
                    > PS: I'm grown up and understand that voltage hurts. No need for safety
                    > warnings unless, of course, you try this yourself. In which case,
                    remember -
                    > voltage hurts. There are several hundred DC volts inside a computer power
                    > supply.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Brian Short [mailto:k7on@...]
                    > Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 9:14 AM
                    > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468
                    >
                    >
                    > I am partial to the '465 and 466 models - the 466 has the
                    > "storage" facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope.
                    >
                    > Currently, I have the '466, but actually I was looking for a
                    > good '465 or '465B at the time.
                    >
                    > I spent 6 years in the Navy prior to College/Grad School
                    > as a Data Systems Tech and always had a 465 at the
                    > ready. Some procedures would require the 466 and it
                    > was available as needed.
                    >
                    > These are 100MHz dual trace, delayed sweep scopes
                    > and are of high quality, though they have been around
                    > awhile. In my mind, they are a great buy!
                    >
                    > I can't speak for the surplus market of later model units.
                    >
                    > Also, I'd only purchase one through a reputable test
                    > equipment dealer (like in Nuts N Volts). I purchased
                    > a couple at a defense contractor auction one time and
                    > it is possible for them to have problems not worth the
                    > expense of fixing or to have ancient calibration records.
                    >
                    > Anyway, my advice, get a 465b - you'll love it.
                    >
                    > My 0.02USD, Brian
                    >
                    > At 09:35 AM 9/1/01 -0400, you wrote:
                    > >Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
                    > >these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
                    > >
                    > >I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
                    > >them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
                    > >
                    > >Doug
                    >
                    > --
                    > k7on@... >or< http://www.qsl.net/k7on/
                    > --
                    > The Boulder Pledge by Roger Ebert, University of Colorado :
                    >
                    > Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to
                    > me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. Nor will I
                    > forward chain letters, petitions, mass mailings, or virus warnings
                    > to large numbers of others. This is my contribution to the survival
                    > of the online community.
                    > --
                    >
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Kipton Moravec
                    What most people do is to add a resistor across the outputs (this produces a load) so when you turn off whatever you are powering, the power supply is still
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 2, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      What most people do is to add a resistor across the outputs (this produces a
                      load) so when you turn off whatever you are powering, the power supply is
                      still using enough current to regulate the voltage correctly.

                      The hard part is knowing how much it needs to regulate.

                      If it is not documented then you have to do it by trial and error. It may
                      be as little as 10 mA or as much as 100 mA? You did not say how many volts
                      it is, or if it is a single output or multi outputs.

                      I would try a 10 mA load to see what happens.
                      You have to remember Ohms law V = IR.
                      Say your power supply is 5V and you want 0.01 A then R = 5V/0.01A = 500 Ohms
                      Don't forget the power. Watts = Volts * Current so 5V * .01 = .05 W any
                      size resistor will work in this case.

                      That is may be too low anyway.
                      If you want 0.1A then the math says 50 Ohms and 1/2 W resistor. That is a
                      little close for me, I would probably go to the next size, a 1W resistor, or
                      use two 100 Ohm 1/2 W resistors in parallel.

                      Remember, you can always parallel resistors to get more current.

                      Kip


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Benoit Provost" <provost@...>
                      To: "SRS" <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2001 7:00 PM
                      Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Bench Power Supply


                      > I also have a switching power supply that I wanted to use as a bench-top,
                      > general purpose power supply. Somebody suggested to add a load to it, but
                      I
                      > could not keep it stable. Maybe the load has to be quite near the value
                      for
                      > which the power supply was designed? When I turn on and off my
                      application
                      > load repeatedly, the power-supply goes in power-protect and shuts off.
                      >
                      > Benoit
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "Dan Creagan" <dcreagan@...>
                      > To: <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 8:05 AM
                      > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Bench Power Supply
                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > > Computer power supplies are switched and require a load. Has anyone
                      > > configured one as a bench supply, and if so, what are the tricks and
                      > traps?
                      > > If I build a box, put a constant load on the different outputs, and use
                      it
                      > > for electronics, do I need to provide any other filtering? What would
                      be
                      > an
                      > > appropriate load?
                      > >
                      > > Links that I've found:
                      > >
                      > > http://server.redden.on.ca/~tcarc/switcher.html This looks like it
                      would
                      > > work for our hobby. Anyone done this?
                      > >
                      > > I know I can just do this and experiment, but I want to get in the
                      > ballpark
                      > > first time ... honeydo's in the new house won't let me spend a lot of
                      time
                      > > experimenting (at least initially)!
                      > >
                      > > Dan
                      > >
                      > > PS: I'm grown up and understand that voltage hurts. No need for safety
                      > > warnings unless, of course, you try this yourself. In which case,
                      > remember -
                      > > voltage hurts. There are several hundred DC volts inside a computer
                      power
                      > > supply.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > -----Original Message-----
                      > > From: Brian Short [mailto:k7on@...]
                      > > Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 9:14 AM
                      > > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I am partial to the '465 and 466 models - the 466 has the
                      > > "storage" facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope.
                      > >
                      > > Currently, I have the '466, but actually I was looking for a
                      > > good '465 or '465B at the time.
                      > >
                      > > I spent 6 years in the Navy prior to College/Grad School
                      > > as a Data Systems Tech and always had a 465 at the
                      > > ready. Some procedures would require the 466 and it
                      > > was available as needed.
                      > >
                      > > These are 100MHz dual trace, delayed sweep scopes
                      > > and are of high quality, though they have been around
                      > > awhile. In my mind, they are a great buy!
                      > >
                      > > I can't speak for the surplus market of later model units.
                      > >
                      > > Also, I'd only purchase one through a reputable test
                      > > equipment dealer (like in Nuts N Volts). I purchased
                      > > a couple at a defense contractor auction one time and
                      > > it is possible for them to have problems not worth the
                      > > expense of fixing or to have ancient calibration records.
                      > >
                      > > Anyway, my advice, get a 465b - you'll love it.
                      > >
                      > > My 0.02USD, Brian
                      > >
                      > > At 09:35 AM 9/1/01 -0400, you wrote:
                      > > >Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
                      > > >these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
                      > > >
                      > > >I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
                      > > >them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
                      > > >
                      > > >Doug
                      > >
                      > > --
                      > > k7on@... >or< http://www.qsl.net/k7on/
                      > > --
                      > > The Boulder Pledge by Roger Ebert, University of Colorado :
                      > >
                      > > Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to
                      > > me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. Nor will I
                      > > forward chain letters, petitions, mass mailings, or virus warnings
                      > > to large numbers of others. This is my contribution to the survival
                      > > of the online community.
                      > > --
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                    • Randy Carter
                      I like to put lamps across them. They provide a reasonable load and glow when the power is on.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 2, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I like to put lamps across them. They provide a reasonable
                        load and glow when the power is on.

                        Kipton Moravec wrote:
                        >
                        > What most people do is to add a resistor across the outputs (this produces a
                        > load) so when you turn off whatever you are powering, the power supply is
                        > still using enough current to regulate the voltage correctly.
                        >
                        > The hard part is knowing how much it needs to regulate.
                        >
                        > If it is not documented then you have to do it by trial and error. It may
                        > be as little as 10 mA or as much as 100 mA? You did not say how many volts
                        > it is, or if it is a single output or multi outputs.
                        >
                        > I would try a 10 mA load to see what happens.
                        > You have to remember Ohms law V = IR.
                        > Say your power supply is 5V and you want 0.01 A then R = 5V/0.01A = 500 Ohms
                        > Don't forget the power. Watts = Volts * Current so 5V * .01 = .05 W any
                        > size resistor will work in this case.
                        >
                        > That is may be too low anyway.
                        > If you want 0.1A then the math says 50 Ohms and 1/2 W resistor. That is a
                        > little close for me, I would probably go to the next size, a 1W resistor, or
                        > use two 100 Ohm 1/2 W resistors in parallel.
                        >
                        > Remember, you can always parallel resistors to get more current.
                        >
                        > Kip
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "Benoit Provost" <provost@...>
                        > To: "SRS" <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2001 7:00 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Bench Power Supply
                        >
                        > > I also have a switching power supply that I wanted to use as a bench-top,
                        > > general purpose power supply. Somebody suggested to add a load to it, but
                        > I
                        > > could not keep it stable. Maybe the load has to be quite near the value
                        > for
                        > > which the power supply was designed? When I turn on and off my
                        > application
                        > > load repeatedly, the power-supply goes in power-protect and shuts off.
                        > >
                        > > Benoit
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: "Dan Creagan" <dcreagan@...>
                        > > To: <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
                        > > Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 8:05 AM
                        > > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Bench Power Supply
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Computer power supplies are switched and require a load. Has anyone
                        > > > configured one as a bench supply, and if so, what are the tricks and
                        > > traps?
                        > > > If I build a box, put a constant load on the different outputs, and use
                        > it
                        > > > for electronics, do I need to provide any other filtering? What would
                        > be
                        > > an
                        > > > appropriate load?
                        > > >
                        > > > Links that I've found:
                        > > >
                        > > > http://server.redden.on.ca/~tcarc/switcher.html This looks like it
                        > would
                        > > > work for our hobby. Anyone done this?
                        > > >
                        > > > I know I can just do this and experiment, but I want to get in the
                        > > ballpark
                        > > > first time ... honeydo's in the new house won't let me spend a lot of
                        > time
                        > > > experimenting (at least initially)!
                        > > >
                        > > > Dan
                        > > >
                        > > > PS: I'm grown up and understand that voltage hurts. No need for safety
                        > > > warnings unless, of course, you try this yourself. In which case,
                        > > remember -
                        > > > voltage hurts. There are several hundred DC volts inside a computer
                        > power
                        > > > supply.
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > -----Original Message-----
                        > > > From: Brian Short [mailto:k7on@...]
                        > > > Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 9:14 AM
                        > > > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                        > > > Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Tektronix 466 or 468
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > I am partial to the '465 and 466 models - the 466 has the
                        > > > "storage" facility, i.e. it is also a storage scope.
                        > > >
                        > > > Currently, I have the '466, but actually I was looking for a
                        > > > good '465 or '465B at the time.
                        > > >
                        > > > I spent 6 years in the Navy prior to College/Grad School
                        > > > as a Data Systems Tech and always had a 465 at the
                        > > > ready. Some procedures would require the 466 and it
                        > > > was available as needed.
                        > > >
                        > > > These are 100MHz dual trace, delayed sweep scopes
                        > > > and are of high quality, though they have been around
                        > > > awhile. In my mind, they are a great buy!
                        > > >
                        > > > I can't speak for the surplus market of later model units.
                        > > >
                        > > > Also, I'd only purchase one through a reputable test
                        > > > equipment dealer (like in Nuts N Volts). I purchased
                        > > > a couple at a defense contractor auction one time and
                        > > > it is possible for them to have problems not worth the
                        > > > expense of fixing or to have ancient calibration records.
                        > > >
                        > > > Anyway, my advice, get a 465b - you'll love it.
                        > > >
                        > > > My 0.02USD, Brian
                        > > >
                        > > > At 09:35 AM 9/1/01 -0400, you wrote:
                        > > > >Any one familiar with Tektronix 466 or 468 scopes? I am looking at
                        > > > >these and the Tektronix 76x3 series.
                        > > > >
                        > > > >I know they are 100mhz dual channel storage scopes. Do you recommend
                        > > > >them for hobby etc? How do they compare with the 76x3 series.
                        > > > >
                        > > > >Doug
                        > > >
                        > > > --
                        > > > k7on@... >or< http://www.qsl.net/k7on/
                        > > > --
                        > > > The Boulder Pledge by Roger Ebert, University of Colorado :
                        > > >
                        > > > Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to
                        > > > me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. Nor will I
                        > > > forward chain letters, petitions, mass mailings, or virus warnings
                        > > > to large numbers of others. This is my contribution to the survival
                        > > > of the online community.
                        > > > --
                        > > >
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                      • Bryan E. Daniel
                        Hello SRS, Possibly, small externally mounted (automotive) 6 volt and 12 volt incandescent lamps with fuses would work as current loads to start and run
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 3, 2001
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                          Hello SRS,

                          Possibly, small externally mounted (automotive) 6 volt and
                          12 volt incandescent lamps with fuses would work as current
                          loads to start and run switching-type computer power
                          supplies.

                          Ohms Law E = I x R
                          P = I x E

                          The lamps and lampholders are available at lighting, auto
                          parts, and hardware stores.
                          The lampholders (sockets), fuses and fuseholders should be
                          rated for the highest voltage available in the cabinet,
                          which may exceed 120 volts AC (U.S.) or 220 volts AC (U.K).

                          Remember to unplug the power cord !

                          For safety, a lamp cage should be placed around the lamp(s)
                          to prevent fire and burn injuries.

                          http://www.leviton.com
                          http://www.leviton.com/sections/prodinfo/lamphold/laframe2.htm

                          http://www.bulbman.com/

                          http://www.carparts.com
                          http://www.napaonline.com

                          Bryan E. Daniel
                          Bellevue, Washington
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