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Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: A.I. movie discussions

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  • Steven Phelps
    btw the reason I used the PC as my starting point and not today s trillion instruction per second super computer was because I wanted to demonstrate the every
    Message 1 of 95 , Jun 29, 2001
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      btw the reason I used the PC as my starting point and not today's trillion
      instruction per second super computer was because I wanted to demonstrate
      the every day computer. 1 Super computer of this speed probably would be
      used for such things as building a brain. A common PC would lend itself to
      the 1000s of companies who'd like to tackle the programming challenge.

      Steve



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Raistlin Majere" <asulwer@...>
      To: <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, June 29, 2001 11:38 AM
      Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: A.I. movie discussions


      > i think we can see it happen within 5 - 10 years
      >
      > Dan Miner wrote:
      > >
      > > > From: RoboVac [mailto:robovac@...]
      > > >
      > > > The first is the brute force method.
      > >
      > > The human brain has billions (or trillions???) of neurons
      > > and connections. Plus, these connections are dynamic - new
      > > ones are forming as new memories are made. To fully map this
      > > and understand how it works seems like an impossible task
      > > that will NEVER happen.
      > >
      > > Now, let's roll back time and look at other things that will
      > > NEVER happen:
      > >
      > > 15 years ago... People will never be able to fully map the
      > > human genome (DNA sequence).
      > > 20 years ago... People will never need more than 640k bytes
      > > of memory in a PC. (Paraphrased Bill Gates quote)
      > > 50 years ago... There will never be a need for more than
      > > about 10 computers in the whole world.
      > > (I forget the exact details here but I think this was
      > > a quote from an IBM executive.)
      > > 100 years ago... People will never go into space.
      > > (say nothing about getting to the moon)
      > > 300 years ago... People will never fly.
      > > (Before hot air balloons)
      > >
      > > > The second way is to have some sort of technical break
      > > > through.
      > >
      > > (see above...)
      > >
      > > In reality, it sure seems impossible to me for a machine
      > > to be equal or greater than human intelligence. But I
      > > think I have enough intelligence/knowledge/wisdom that I
      > > won't say it will never happen. I believe that instead of
      > > discussing IF it can happen we should guess WHEN it will
      > > happen. My guess: 50 to 100 years.
      > >
      > > Never say never.
      > >
      > > - Dan Miner
      > >
      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
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    • Party of Citizens
      ... Just wait until social-communication robotics gets into high gear. Roboconspiracies? Actually babies are pretty easy to avoid sucking up. ... Somewhere in
      Message 95 of 95 , Jul 6, 2001
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        On Thu, 5 Jul 2001, RoboVac wrote:

        > Well here at Robo Vac Systems Incorporated we are trying very hard to
        > prevent just that.

        Just wait until social-communication robotics gets into high
        gear. Roboconspiracies?

        Actually babies are pretty easy to avoid sucking up.
        > The hard part is not eating power cords, which can lead to a very shocking
        > experience. And of course having a half ton scrub bot run amuck gives new
        > meaning to the term "Fatal Crash".

        Somewhere in the literature I came across a reference to a scrub-mate
        robot in use by US postal service public buildings where it scrubs
        porcelain in bathrooms. Are you familiar with it?
        FWP

        > William Crolley
        > Senior Engineer
        > Robo Vac System Inc.
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: dan michaels <dan@...>
        > To: <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2001 10:34 PM
        > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] Re: A.I. and Asimov
        >
        >
        > > --- In SeattleRobotics@y..., dpa@i... wrote:
        > > > Hi
        > > >
        > > > "Asimov's 3 laws" make entertaining sci-fi reading but have proved
        > > > un-related to the world at large. It has been observed before on
        > > > this list that among the first real autonomous robots deployed in
        > > > science-fact were the military's cruise missles, which violate
        > > > all three...
        > > >
        > >
        > > Definitely so, if building a weapon. But I'd like my robovac not to
        > > suck up baby.
        > >
        > > oric_dan
        > >
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
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        >
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        >
        >
        >
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