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A New Indoor Game

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  • carolhazlett
    I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan but does not need the vision system. Instead of cones have an object that is emitting a
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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      I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan but does not need the vision system.  Instead of cones have an object that is emitting a specific frequency and place several in the room, each having a different frequency, then spread obstacles around and each robot must go to each frequency emitter , in a certain order and not touch any of the obstacles while doing so.  Like in Robo-Magellan each robot must touch the frequency emitter without moving it.  It would be a lot like Robo-Magellan but no need for elaborate vision system and could be scaled in any size to fit the space available.  I am going to try and set up a demo of this idea to see if it would be feasible and fun.

    • Lloyd Moore
      Interesting idea actually – AND it would be something that not many others are doing which is processing sound spatially. The one thing that I would look for
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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        Interesting idea actually – AND it would be something that not many others are doing which is processing sound spatially. The one thing that I would look for would be how echoes and various multi-path influences play into the mix. Not that this is a bad thing – it is totally real world – but could add quite a challenge to the game.

         

        Thanks,

        Lloyd

         

        From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of carolhazlett@...
        Sent: Monday, October 07, 2013 2:55 PM
        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SeattleRobotics] A New Indoor Game

         

         

        I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan but does not need the vision system.  Instead of cones have an object that is emitting a specific frequency and place several in the room, each having a different frequency, then spread obstacles around and each robot must go to each frequency emitter , in a certain order and not touch any of the obstacles while doing so.  Like in Robo-Magellan each robot must touch the frequency emitter without moving it.  It would be a lot like Robo-Magellan but no need for elaborate vision system and could be scaled in any size to fit the space available.  I am going to try and set up a demo of this idea to see if it would be feasible and fun.

      • dpa_io
        The DPRG has in the past run a RoboMagellan-like contest in which the target waypoints were simply circles, 10 feet in diameter. Some part of the robo must
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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          The DPRG has in the past run a RoboMagellan-like contest in which the target waypoints were simply circles, 10 feet in diameter.  Some part of the robo must cross into the circle.   As Peter B. observed a few years ago, the most interesting part of way-point navigation is what happens in between the waypoints.


            This contest had the additional advantage that you didn't have to carry a bunch of orange cones with you when you wanted to go to the local park and play with your robot.  More significantly, the robot can be sent to locations that you have not already been to first.  


          For your indoor contest, it is pretty easy to hone in on an IR beacon (i.e., an IR LED modulated at 38 kHz) with a couple of IR detectors on the robot.  This is the way the classic roomba finds it's charging base, for example.


          best regards,

          dpa




          ---In SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com, <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan but does not need the vision system.  Instead of cones have an object that is emitting a specific frequency and place several in the room, each having a different frequency, then spread obstacles around and each robot must go to each frequency emitter , in a certain order and not touch any of the obstacles while doing so.  Like in Robo-Magellan each robot must touch the frequency emitter without moving it.  It would be a lot like Robo-Magellan but no need for elaborate vision system and could be scaled in any size to fit the space available.  I am going to try and set up a demo of this idea to see if it would be feasible and fun.

        • KM6VV
          What frequency? IR, visible, UV, radio, sound? Did I forget any? Radiation? We do radio FOX hunts, but not indoors. Alan
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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            What frequency? IR, visible, UV, radio, sound? Did I forget any?
            Radiation?

            We do radio "FOX" hunts, but not indoors.

            Alan

            On 10/7/2013 2:55 PM, carolhazlett@... wrote:
            >
            >
            > I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan
            > but does not need the vision system. Instead of cones have an object
            > that is emitting a specific frequency and place several in the room,
            > each having a different frequency, then spread obstacles around and each
            > robot must go to each frequency emitter , in a certain order and not
            > touch any of the obstacles while doing so. Like in Robo-Magellan each
            > robot must touch the frequency emitter without moving it. It would be a
            > lot like Robo-Magellan but no need for elaborate vision system and could
            > be scaled in any size to fit the space available. I am going to try and
            > set up a demo of this idea to see if it would be feasible and fun.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
            >
          • kevinr
            I have been thinking of how to discern scents. With an IR spectroscope I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon. Other scents may have more easily
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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              I have been thinking of how to discern scents.  With an IR spectroscope I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon.  Other scents may have more easily determined IR spectra but these will smell OK while you run the event.  You could have a scent at each site or you could make trails of each scent to get to a goal.  This way you could test  your ability to determine a number of IR frequencies at once. 
                  Kevin.


              On 10/7/2013 3:28 PM, KM6VV wrote:
               

              What frequency? IR, visible, UV, radio, sound? Did I forget any?
              Radiation?

              We do radio "FOX" hunts, but not indoors.

              Alan

              On 10/7/2013 2:55 PM, carolhazlett@... wrote:
              >
              >
              > I have an idea for an indoor game that sort of simulates Robo-Magellan
              > but does not need the vision system. Instead of cones have an object
              > that is emitting a specific frequency and place several in the room,
              > each having a different frequency, then spread obstacles around and each
              > robot must go to each frequency emitter , in a certain order and not
              > touch any of the obstacles while doing so. Like in Robo-Magellan each
              > robot must touch the frequency emitter without moving it. It would be a
              > lot like Robo-Magellan but no need for elaborate vision system and could
              > be scaled in any size to fit the space available. I am going to try and
              > set up a demo of this idea to see if it would be feasible and fun.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
              >


            • KM6VV
              Determine scents with IR? How is that? Do you have a reference? Alan KM6VV
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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                Determine scents with IR? How is that? Do you have a reference?

                Alan KM6VV

                On 10/7/2013 3:55 PM, kevinr wrote:
                >
                >
                > I have been thinking of how to discern scents. With an IR spectroscope
                > I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon. Other scents may have
                > more easily determined IR spectra but these will smell OK while you run
                > the event. You could have a scent at each site or you could make trails
                > of each scent to get to a goal. This way you could test your ability
                > to determine a number of IR frequencies at once.
                > Kevin.
                >
                >
                >
              • kevinr
                Any standard spectroscopy text book would do fine. KD5ONS
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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                  Any standard spectroscopy text book would do fine.
                      KD5ONS

                  On 10/7/2013 4:53 PM, KM6VV wrote:
                   

                  Determine scents with IR? How is that? Do you have a reference?

                  Alan KM6VV

                  On 10/7/2013 3:55 PM, kevinr wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > I have been thinking of how to discern scents. With an IR spectroscope
                  > I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon. Other scents may have
                  > more easily determined IR spectra but these will smell OK while you run
                  > the event. You could have a scent at each site or you could make trails
                  > of each scent to get to a goal. This way you could test your ability
                  > to determine a number of IR frequencies at once.
                  > Kevin.
                  >
                  >
                  >


                • kevinr
                  I think obtaining ten measurements of IR at spaced frequencies through the various chemical signature areas would be sufficient. A stage or two of signal
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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                    I think obtaining ten measurements of IR at spaced frequencies through the various chemical "signature" areas would be sufficient.  A stage or two of signal conditioning after each frequency's sensor could be used to feed a neural net "recognizer".  This would "decide" which scent is stronger at any given time.  I don't think this is being done at the present but any interesting problem is hard to solve.  I think of this as a challenge.  I would like to apply the techniques learned to allow me to do the same measurements in a forest.  The many terpenes present could be measured to provide an analysis of the health of the trees.
                        Kevin.


                    On 10/7/2013 5:00 PM, kevinr wrote:
                     

                    Any standard spectroscopy text book would do fine.
                        KD5ONS

                    On 10/7/2013 4:53 PM, KM6VV wrote:
                     

                    Determine scents with IR? How is that? Do you have a reference?

                    Alan KM6VV

                    On 10/7/2013 3:55 PM, kevinr wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I have been thinking of how to discern scents. With an IR spectroscope
                    > I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon. Other scents may have
                    > more easily determined IR spectra but these will smell OK while you run
                    > the event. You could have a scent at each site or you could make trails
                    > of each scent to get to a goal. This way you could test your ability
                    > to determine a number of IR frequencies at once.
                    > Kevin.
                    >
                    >
                    >



                  • KM6VV
                    Sounds a little bit deep for my dumb bots! I d be more inclined to use modulated IR beacons around a room. Alan KM6VV
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 7, 2013
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                      Sounds a little bit deep for my dumb 'bots!

                      I'd be more inclined to use modulated IR beacons around a room.

                      Alan KM6VV

                      On 10/7/2013 5:00 PM, kevinr wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Any standard spectroscopy text book would do fine.
                      > KD5ONS
                      >
                      > On 10/7/2013 4:53 PM, KM6VV wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Determine scents with IR? How is that? Do you have a reference?
                      >>
                      >> Alan KM6VV
                      >>
                      >> On 10/7/2013 3:55 PM, kevinr wrote:
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> > I have been thinking of how to discern scents. With an IR spectroscope
                      >> > I can determine vanilla, lavender, and cinnamon. Other scents may have
                      >> > more easily determined IR spectra but these will smell OK while you run
                      >> > the event. You could have a scent at each site or you could make trails
                      >> > of each scent to get to a goal. This way you could test your ability
                      >> > to determine a number of IR frequencies at once.
                      >> > Kevin.
                      >> >
                      >>
                    • KM6VV
                      You re saying that various scents generate IR? Hadn t heard of that. So would you have to heat the samples to analyze them? Alan KM6VV
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 8, 2013
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                        You're saying that various scents generate IR? Hadn't heard of that.
                        So would you have to heat the samples to analyze them?

                        Alan KM6VV

                        On 10/7/2013 5:19 PM, kevinr wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > I think obtaining ten measurements of IR at spaced frequencies through
                        > the various chemical "signature" areas would be sufficient. A stage or
                        > two of signal conditioning after each frequency's sensor could be used
                        > to feed a neural net "recognizer". This would "decide" which scent is
                        > stronger at any given time. I don't think this is being done at the
                        > present but any interesting problem is hard to solve. I think of this
                        > as a challenge. I would like to apply the techniques learned to allow
                        > me to do the same measurements in a forest. The many terpenes present
                        > could be measured to provide an analysis of the health of the trees.
                        > Kevin.
                        >
                        >
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