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Re: [SeattleRobotics] servos

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  • Bryan E. Daniel
    These links are about modifying a hobby servomotor to rotate 360 degrees (or more): http://www.rdrop.com/users/marvin/other/servo.txt
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2000
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    • Kevin Ross
      Steven, I guess I am not exactly sure what you are trying to accomplish. It appears that you are attempting to drive a servo motor without a CPU? Are you
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 13, 2000
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        Steven,

        I guess I am not exactly sure what you are trying to accomplish. It appears
        that you are attempting to drive a servo motor without a CPU? Are you
        attempting continuous rotation or positioning?

        What format are you saving your .BMP files in? When I attempt to view them,
        they appear to be a quick time movie or something along those lines. I am
        unable to view them.

        Kevin

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Steven Frankel <TSFrankel@...>
        To: <SeattleRobotics@egroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, August 13, 2000 5:55 AM
        Subject: [SeattleRobotics] servos


        > Did anyone notice my servo mod idea? Check out post 1174 and tell me
        > what u think.
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
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      • Pete Miles
        I once juiced up a Futaba S-148 to 18V just to see what happens. It was fast, and had lots of torque. But only did this for only a few seconds. It didn t
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 7, 2000
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          I once juiced up a Futaba S-148 to 18V just to see what happens. It was
          fast, and had lots of torque. But only did this for only a few seconds. It
          didn't fry! Probably really lucky here.

          The primary circuit inside these servos is rates to 7.2V max.

          Just don't be surprised when they die because being overloaded too much.

          Pete Miles
          petem@...

          > ----------
          > From: Reconbot@...[SMTP:Reconbot@...]
          > Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2000 2:59 PM
          > To: seattlerobotics@egroups.com
          > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] servos
          >
          >
          > I rember a while back that someone was looking for information about
          > giving a
          > servo more power. Just now I found this off the Lynxmotion web stite.
          >
          > Servo Power Requirements:
          > Author: Jim Frye
          >
          > Have you ever wondered what the limits are to servo power? Well I have
          > been
          > doing some research in this area, and have found some interesting facts.
          > The
          > servo is rated for 4.8 to 6 volts. This is representational of 4 AA Nicad
          > b
          > atteries for 4.8 volts, or 4 AA Alkaline batteries for 6 volts. However
          > the
          > servo is an analog device, which means there is a certain amount of
          > tolerance
          > inherent to the design. A rep from Hitec has assured me that the
          > electronics don't smoke until about 12 volts is applied. I have also
          > found
          > that it is considered very common for some remote control race car folks
          > to
          > power the servo directly from the 7.2 volt sub-C battery pack used by
          > the
          > drive motor. Also the servo is quite a bit faster, which can result in
          > more
          > torque when moving an item with more mass. If anyone has any usefull
          > information on measuring rotational torque using simple cheap fixturing
          > I
          > would love to here from you. Below is a list of servo supply voltages,
          > and
          > the estimated torque values. These values are based on the assumption
          > that
          > from a given percentage of increase in voltage, approximately 68% of
          > that
          > increase will be reflected as an increase in torque. For example,
          > increasing the voltage from 4.8 vdc to 6.0 vdc is a 25% increase. So 25
          > x
          > .68 = 17%, which means the increase in torque should be 42 + 17% = 49.17
          > oz/
          > in. Of course these are just estimates based on limited technical specs
          > from
          > Hitec, your mileage may vary...
          >
          > Ratings for a Hitec HS-300 Standard Servo
          >
          > -20% of rated voltage
          > 4.8 vdc = 42 oz/in
          >
          > Rated voltage
          > 6.0 vdc = 49 oz/in
          >
          > +20% of rated voltage
          > 7.2 vdc = 55 oz/in
          >
          > +50% of rated voltage
          > 9.0 vdc = 67 oz/in
          >
          > The really great part to using the 7.2 volt sub-C packs are, there
          > availability. You can visit your local hobby shop, or mail order the packs
          > f
          > rom Lynxmotion for around $20.00, we also carry the MRC Super Brain 809
          > high
          > quality peak detection quick chargers for $46.00. You can even get the
          > quick
          > disconnect plugs to wire onto your robot. Disclaimer Use this
          > information
          > at your own risk! I have several robots using the 7.2 volt battery
          > packs,
          > including a Hexapod II with 12 Futaba 9202's. It is strong enough to do
          > a
          > one handed pushup, with no hesitation. I trust the electronics enough to
          >
          > risk $720.00 worth of servos. But don't even complain to me if you blow
          > up
          > something. ;-)
          >
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          > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
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