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Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

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  • Ryan Myrda
    After much debate on my regular Chibots message board, I m going to actually go with the i.mx53 quick start board from Freescale as soon as I can get my hands
    Message 1 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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      After much debate on my regular Chibots message board, I'm going to actually go with the i.mx53 quick start board from Freescale as soon as I can get my hands on one.  I'll used linux then as a high level controller and interface my camera to it and use a Rabbit3000 processor as a slave to handle low level control of the motors.  This system is going to get implemented on a robo-magellan robot in the future so while it is a bit overkill for the vision based linefollower, add a GPS, Compass, sonars, bumbers, and an accelerometer to tilt compensate the compass and it will be adequate. 

       

      Does anyone have experience with any of the i.mx series from Freescale?

       

      Thanks,

      Ryan




      From: Weston Turner <wstnturner@...>
      To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 12:48:24 AM
      Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

       

      I recommend the Maple board made by LeafLabs. I'm holding off on buying some until the Maple Native arrives, but if you are coming from the Aurduino world, you will be more than satisfied (happy!). I know that you can order them form SparkFun. 


      Good Luck, and happy embedded programming!

      Weston

      On Mon, Apr 30, 2012 at 8:26 PM, Chris Baron <chris@...> wrote:
       

      The Maple boards from Leaf Labs are Arduino shaped and have a port of
      the Arduino IDE with minor changes. They have a STM32F1 chip on there.
      Should do a lot more than an ATMega328.

      http://leaflabs.com



      > Hey Guys,
      >
      > First message here in a long time, I used to follow the board a while
      > back though, I'm a member of CHIBOTS from chicago, but am looking for
      > more answers to a question.
      >
      > I built a vision based linefollower about a month or 2 ago and have
      > completely surpassed all the capability of 2 arduino UNO's in the
      > process. I know I can get rid of the arduino bootloader and probably
      > keep developing with the current setup using WINAVR or BASCOM to
      > eliminate the processor drain caused by the bootloader, but I'd rather
      > move to a ARM processor and have plenty of room to grow.
      >
      > Does anyone have some suggestions for moving to ARM? Boards supported
      > by good, free IDE's are what I'm looking for. I'm not a software guy
      > so I'm learning this on my own. I like the CORTEX-M4 with floating
      > point, but any of the processor's that have extra floating point
      > capability would be what I'm looking for. Any tutorials or articles
      > geared towards the hobbyist would be good too.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Ryan


    • Dan Tebbs
      I used the i.MX 25 last year. It was a remarkably painful experience. I cannot recommend it. Yes the i.MX series is fast, yes it is low cost, and yes it has a
      Message 2 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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        I used the i.MX 25 last year. It was a remarkably painful experience. I cannot recommend it. Yes the i.MX series is fast, yes it is low cost, and yes it has a huge number of integrated features. But the tools, documentation and Freescale support sucked rotten eggs. The time and hair-pulling just weren't worth it.

        If you do go with it anyway, do not use Redboot, LTIB, and the toolchain they supply. Instead go with UBoot and CodeSourcery.

        -Dan


        On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 7:50 AM, Ryan Myrda <ryanmyrda@...> wrote:
         

        After much debate on my regular Chibots message board, I'm going to actually go with the i.mx53 quick start board from Freescale as soon as I can get my hands on one.  I'll used linux then as a high level controller and interface my camera to it and use a Rabbit3000 processor as a slave to handle low level control of the motors.  This system is going to get implemented on a robo-magellan robot in the future so while it is a bit overkill for the vision based linefollower, add a GPS, Compass, sonars, bumbers, and an accelerometer to tilt compensate the compass and it will be adequate. 

         

        Does anyone have experience with any of the i.mx series from Freescale?

         

        Thanks,

        Ryan




        From: Weston Turner <wstnturner@...>
        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 12:48:24 AM
        Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

         

        I recommend the Maple board made by LeafLabs. I'm holding off on buying some until the Maple Native arrives, but if you are coming from the Aurduino world, you will be more than satisfied (happy!). I know that you can order them form SparkFun. 


        Good Luck, and happy embedded programming!

        Weston

        On Mon, Apr 30, 2012 at 8:26 PM, Chris Baron <chris@...> wrote:
         

        The Maple boards from Leaf Labs are Arduino shaped and have a port of
        the Arduino IDE with minor changes. They have a STM32F1 chip on there.
        Should do a lot more than an ATMega328.

        http://leaflabs.com



        > Hey Guys,
        >
        > First message here in a long time, I used to follow the board a while
        > back though, I'm a member of CHIBOTS from chicago, but am looking for
        > more answers to a question.
        >
        > I built a vision based linefollower about a month or 2 ago and have
        > completely surpassed all the capability of 2 arduino UNO's in the
        > process. I know I can get rid of the arduino bootloader and probably
        > keep developing with the current setup using WINAVR or BASCOM to
        > eliminate the processor drain caused by the bootloader, but I'd rather
        > move to a ARM processor and have plenty of room to grow.
        >
        > Does anyone have some suggestions for moving to ARM? Boards supported
        > by good, free IDE's are what I'm looking for. I'm not a software guy
        > so I'm learning this on my own. I like the CORTEX-M4 with floating
        > point, but any of the processor's that have extra floating point
        > capability would be what I'm looking for. Any tutorials or articles
        > geared towards the hobbyist would be good too.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Ryan





        --
        Dan Tebbs
        Auric Consulting LLC
        Ph: 425-341-3261
        Email: DanTebbs@...
        http://www.Linkedin.com/in/dantebbs
        http://www.AuricConsultingLLC.com

      • Brad garton
        Looks like I m late to the party but.. Another alternative for ARM is the BeagleBoards. I just got the BeagleBone and it has an embedded IDE (Cloud 9) it looks
        Message 3 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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          Looks like I’m late to the party but….

           

          Another alternative for ARM is the BeagleBoards.

           

          I just got the BeagleBone and it has an embedded IDE (Cloud 9) it looks like, not sure how good it is yet.  If it sucks you can use Eclipse/gcc across multiple platforms and sneakernet  the SD card to your development system and build the images that way.  Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard XM are widely used and you can get videos on Youtube that show a ton of things about setting up and operating if you’re unfamiliar with the environment.

           

          Another option for ARM is the Atmel SAM. If you are not using Linux, you can use Atmel Studio on with a  SAM3 and 4 card (need to use AS6, neither has an MMU, so no Full Linux distros).  It looks like the cards aren’t that terribly expensive and there are third party SAM boards that are really cheap as well. What I haven’t figured out yet is how to use the Built in libraries for AS6 with non Atmel cards. I know you can do it though, and there are some really powerful source libraries in that kit.

           

          Yet another alternative but you will wait for it, is the Raspberry Pi, at 25.00-35.00.  It has an MMU and comes with Linux, video output, audio  as well. There are a TON of other ARM based cards.  Including some uClinux boards and mBed boards to name a few. I have not used the tools on any of these.   It looks like the gcc tools are doing a good job of cross compiling and Eclipse supports  customizing commands to the tools set for cross compiles so should be pretty easy free development platform.

           

          B

           

          From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dan Tebbs
          Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 10:02 AM
          To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

           




          I used the i.MX 25 last year. It was a remarkably painful experience. I cannot recommend it. Yes the i.MX series is fast, yes it is low cost, and yes it has a huge number of integrated features. But the tools, documentation and Freescale support sucked rotten eggs. The time and hair-pulling just weren't worth it.

          If you do go with it anyway, do not use Redboot, LTIB, and the toolchain they supply. Instead go with UBoot and CodeSourcery.

          -Dan

          On Tue, May 1, 2012 at 7:50 AM, Ryan Myrda <ryanmyrda@...> wrote:

           

          After much debate on my regular Chibots message board, I'm going to actually go with the i.mx53 quick start board from Freescale as soon as I can get my hands on one.  I'll used linux then as a high level controller and interface my camera to it and use a Rabbit3000 processor as a slave to handle low level control of the motors.  This system is going to get implemented on a robo-magellan robot in the future so while it is a bit overkill for the vision based linefollower, add a GPS, Compass, sonars, bumbers, and an accelerometer to tilt compensate the compass and it will be adequate. 

           

          Does anyone have experience with any of the i.mx series from Freescale?

           

          Thanks,

          Ryan

           

           


          From: Weston Turner <wstnturner@...>
          To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 12:48:24 AM
          Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations


           

          I recommend the Maple board made by LeafLabs. I'm holding off on buying some until the Maple Native arrives, but if you are coming from the Aurduino world, you will be more than satisfied (happy!). I know that you can order them form SparkFun. 

           

          Good Luck, and happy embedded programming!

           

          Weston

           

          On Mon, Apr 30, 2012 at 8:26 PM, Chris Baron <chris@...> wrote:

           

          The Maple boards from Leaf Labs are Arduino shaped and have a port of
          the Arduino IDE with minor changes. They have a STM32F1 chip on there.
          Should do a lot more than an ATMega328.

          http://leaflabs.com



          > Hey Guys,
          >
          > First message here in a long time, I used to follow the board a while
          > back though, I'm a member of CHIBOTS from chicago, but am looking for
          > more answers to a question.
          >
          > I built a vision based linefollower about a month or 2 ago and have
          > completely surpassed all the capability of 2 arduino UNO's in the
          > process. I know I can get rid of the arduino bootloader and probably
          > keep developing with the current setup using WINAVR or BASCOM to
          > eliminate the processor drain caused by the bootloader, but I'd rather
          > move to a ARM processor and have plenty of room to grow.
          >
          > Does anyone have some suggestions for moving to ARM? Boards supported
          > by good, free IDE's are what I'm looking for. I'm not a software guy
          > so I'm learning this on my own. I like the CORTEX-M4 with floating
          > point, but any of the processor's that have extra floating point
          > capability would be what I'm looking for. Any tutorials or articles
          > geared towards the hobbyist would be good too.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Ryan

           




          --
          Dan Tebbs
          Auric Consulting LLC
          Ph: 425-341-3261
          Email: DanTebbs@...
          http://www.Linkedin.com/in/dantebbs
          http://www.AuricConsultingLLC.com




        • Lee Fisher
          ... Me also, sorry. Short answer: try a DreamPlug, or a PandaBoard, or something Linaro targets. Long answer: Another option is PandaBoard. In current Android
          Message 4 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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            > Looks like I'm late to the party but..

            Me also, sorry.

            Short answer: try a DreamPlug, or a PandaBoard, or something Linaro targets.

            Long answer:

            Another option is PandaBoard. In current Android ASOP 4.0, its the only
            one that works out-of-the-box. I just talked to some Canonical ARM QA
            guy at LFNW over the weekend, and he had many Pandas, a few Beagles, and
            OEM proto boards.
            http://pandaboard.org/

            The FreedomBox project tracks low-cost [mostly ARM] hardware capable of
            running a Linux box with multiple servers. They currently use the
            GlobalScale Technology's DreamPlug as a dev board. (I have one, quite
            nice. Works on AC or DC. A friend has it connected to an RC car, using
            it's battery to power it.) There is a DreamPlug2 out now, too. Another
            reason to track FreedomBox hardware is that the project is Free
            Software-backed, and they're working to get the entire toolchain working
            using fresh GNU tools, not vendor/mgfr toolchains with non-free loaders
            and tools.
            http://wiki.debian.org/FreedomBox/TargetedHardware
            http://www.globalscaletechnologies.com/p-43-d2-plug.aspx

            Also, I'd consider an ARM dev board that supports the Linaro targets.
            Then you don't have to build your own Ubuntu or Android kernel, if you
            don't need to.
            http://www.linaro.org/downloads/

            This is also a nice list for comparing ARM boards.
            http://www.gnuarm.com/ArmDevices_frame.html

            OP was asking for some tutorials.
            http://elinux.org/
            http://free-electrons.com/docs/

            Rasberry PI sounds like it will nice. But AFAIK it is still mostly
            future-tense for now, so unless you need to wait so you can buy a much
            cheaper board, there are great options out today. Anyone, please speak
            up if you know of a shipping source. :-)

            > [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard
            > XM are widely used and you can get videos on Youtube [...]

            I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think
            Bone was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but
            they do sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't
            the Beagle XM better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.
          • Brad garton
            ... can get videos on Youtube [...] ... was that widely distributed yet. I ve yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room
            Message 5 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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              >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
              can get videos on Youtube [...]

              >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
              was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
              sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
              better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

              Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
              favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
              there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
              an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
              than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
              size of the XM) if that matters in the design.


              Here are the I/Os:

              Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
              3.3V I/O on all signals
              McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
              AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
              EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

              (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
              and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
              which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

              It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
              from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
              tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
              with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
              stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
              be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
              be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
              many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
              capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
              expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
              if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
              really need more I/O than that for this project.

              On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
              on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
              Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
              but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
              version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
              would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
              as far as I know.)

              I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
              but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
              saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
              be patient on that one.

              I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
              figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

              I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
              GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
              options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
              yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

              B




              ------------------------------------

              Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links
            • Wes Edwards
              I m also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful. I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with
              Message 6 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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                I'm also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful.  I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with arduino-level AVR's for sub-systems, but I'm now looking for a board for a smaller table-top robot.  It doesn't have to run linux, but a small board like a Raspberry Pi is attractive.

                 

                Does anyone have any experience/ opinion on the STM Discovery board?  The cost of the board looks very attractive with some nice features but I don't know what other costs are involved.  I'd be looking to use a free toolchain (gcc, eclipse, ??) with it if possible.  Debugging is possible but I don't know what additional costs are associated to use it - eg do I need some commercial hardware).

                http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp

                 

                Wes

                 

                 

                From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad garton
                Sent: Wednesday, 2 May 2012 2:44 p.m.
                To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                 

                 


                >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
                can get videos on Youtube [...]

                >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

                Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                size of the XM) if that matters in the design.

                Here are the I/Os:

                Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                3.3V I/O on all signals
                McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
                EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

                (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

                It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                really need more I/O than that for this project.

                On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                as far as I know.)

                I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                be patient on that one.

                I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

                I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

                B

                ------------------------------------

                Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links

              • Ryan Myrda
                A friend of mine has loaned me a i.MX53 quick start board and I got it up and running in no time.  Freescale advertises 60 seconds, however, tracking down a
                Message 7 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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                  A friend of mine has loaned me a i.MX53 quick start board and I got it up and running in no time.  Freescale advertises 60 seconds, however, tracking down a monitor, keyboard, and mouse, that was used or wireless took the longest time.  It seems to be very promising and I'm looking forward to doing some development on it.  About 10 members from my club have jumped in on the camera based linefollower and its now a club project to work with similar chassis and together to get them accomplished.  Overall, I've learned that there are tons of processors out there to be used and each one has its benefits and its drawbacks.  Did I make the right choice?  I dont know yet, however, I do feel it was informed and well researched and chosen to fit a specific application.  The Beagleboard XM took a close second.  The larger built in RAM, SATA port and smaller size made the freescale board win the competition.

                   

                  More to report later hopefully.

                   

                  Ryan

                   

                   


                  From: Brad garton <bgart@...>
                  To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, May 1, 2012 9:43:50 PM
                  Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                   


                  >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
                  can get videos on Youtube [...]

                  >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                  was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                  sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                  better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

                  Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                  favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                  there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                  an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                  than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                  size of the XM) if that matters in the design.

                  Here are the I/Os:

                  Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                  3.3V I/O on all signals
                  McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                  AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
                  EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

                  (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                  and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                  which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

                  It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                  from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                  tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                  with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                  stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                  be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                  be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                  many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                  capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                  expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                  if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                  really need more I/O than that for this project.

                  On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                  on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                  Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                  but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                  version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                  would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                  as far as I know.)

                  I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                  but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                  saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                  be patient on that one.

                  I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                  figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

                  I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                  GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                  options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                  yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

                  B

                  ------------------------------------

                  Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links

                • Brad garton
                  The price is nice for that board, and it has an accelerometer built in too. Looking that the tools App note though,
                  Message 8 of 15 , May 1, 2012
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                    The price is nice for that board, and it has an accelerometer built in too.  Looking that the tools App note though,

                     

                    http://www.st.com/internet/com/TECHNICAL_RESOURCES/TECHNICAL_LITERATURE/USER_MANUAL/DM00037368.pdf

                    Those  tools cost a bit, though most have trials you can use long enough to get going . I didn’t see an obvious place to get free versions of tools to develop specifically with this board. However  one of the tools, TASKING is based on  eclipse.  With some work you could probably just get the ST Libraries from the bottom of the  link, eclipse and gcc and do it yourself.  Not Arduino easy, but doable.   

                     

                    Brad

                    From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wes Edwards
                    Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 10:38 PM
                    To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                     




                    I'm also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful.  I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with arduino-level AVR's for sub-systems, but I'm now looking for a board for a smaller table-top robot.  It doesn't have to run linux, but a small board like a Raspberry Pi is attractive.

                     

                    Does anyone have any experience/ opinion on the STM Discovery board?  The cost of the board looks very attractive with some nice features but I don't know what other costs are involved.  I'd be looking to use a free toolchain (gcc, eclipse, ??) with it if possible.  Debugging is possible but I don't know what additional costs are associated to use it - eg do I need some commercial hardware).

                    http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp

                     

                    Wes

                     

                     

                    From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad garton
                    Sent: Wednesday, 2 May 2012 2:44 p.m.
                    To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                     

                     


                    >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
                    can get videos on Youtube [...]

                    >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                    was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                    sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                    better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

                    Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                    favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                    there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                    an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                    than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                    size of the XM) if that matters in the design.

                    Here are the I/Os:

                    Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                    3.3V I/O on all signals
                    McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                    AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
                    EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

                    (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                    and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                    which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

                    It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                    from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                    tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                    with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                    stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                    be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                    be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                    many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                    capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                    expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                    if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                    really need more I/O than that for this project.

                    On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                    on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                    Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                    but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                    version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                    would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                    as far as I know.)

                    I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                    but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                    saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                    be patient on that one.

                    I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                    figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

                    I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                    GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                    options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                    yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

                    B

                    ------------------------------------

                    Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links

                     




                  • Dick Curtiss
                    I am currently working with the STM32F4-Discovery board (about $15) and so far have not been disappointed. Previously, I worked with the PSoC 5 First Touch
                    Message 9 of 15 , May 3, 2012
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                      I am currently working with the STM32F4-Discovery board (about $15) and so far have not been disappointed.  Previously, I worked with the PSoC 5 First Touch board, a $50 item.  The PSoC was easier going because the support software (drivers for functional components) is more advanced than the peripheral driver modules provided for the STM32.  Signal routing to pins and peripheral initialization has to be coded manually for the STM32, whereas the PSoC IDE automates that.  Also, the IDE for the PSoC was no additional cost and has no limitations, whereas the STM32 no-cost IDEs that I’ve tried limit code generation to 32K.

                       

                      STM32 IDEs:

                      I first tried Atollic’s TrueSTUDIO, which pops up annoying reminders to buy the very expensive professional version.  I am now trying Keil’s uVision 4, which so far has not popped up any reminders.  The editor in TrueSTUDIO is more helpful (intellisense) than that in uVision 4 (perhaps I haven’t learned enough about using it).  Both have debuggers for code running on the processor.  TASKING and EWARM, the other two IDEs supported in the application examples, have not been investigated.  I think open-source tools are also available, but haven’t looked into it.

                       

                      Dick Curtiss

                       


                      From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wes Edwards
                      Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:38 PM
                      To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                       

                       

                      I'm also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful.  I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with arduino-level AVR's for sub-systems, but I'm now looking for a board for a smaller table-top robot.  It doesn't have to run linux, but a small board like a Raspberry Pi is attractive.

                       

                      Does anyone have any experience/ opinion on the STM Discovery board?  The cost of the board looks very attractive with some nice features but I don't know what other costs are involved.  I'd be looking to use a free toolchain (gcc, eclipse, ??) with it if possible.  Debugging is possible but I don't know what additional costs are associated to use it - eg do I need some commercial hardware).

                      http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp

                       

                      Wes

                       

                       

                      From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad garton
                      Sent: Wednesday, 2 May 2012 2:44 p.m.
                      To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                       

                       


                      >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and
                      you
                      can get videos on Youtube [...]

                      >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                      was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                      sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                      better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

                      Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                      favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                      there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                      an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                      than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                      size of the XM) if that matters in the design.

                      Here are the I/Os:

                      Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                      3.3V I/O on all signals
                      McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                      AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports , CAN0,
                      EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

                      (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                      and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                      which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

                      It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                      from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                      tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                      with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                      stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                      be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                      be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                      many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                      capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                      expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                      if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                      really need more I/O than that for this project.

                      On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                      on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                      Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                      but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                      version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                      would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                      as far as I know.)

                      I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                      but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                      saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                      be patient on that one.

                      I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                      figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

                      I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                      GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                      options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                      yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

                      B

                      ------------------------------------

                      Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links

                    • Lloyd Moore
                      I happen to be starting to work with the STM32 series as well and found the development tools to be WAY expensive. There is an alternative however, there are
                      Message 10 of 15 , May 3, 2012
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                        I happen to be starting to work with the STM32 series as well and found the development tools to be WAY expensive. There is an alternative however, there are instructions on the web for setting up a free tool chain that doesn’t have any limitations. I’ve done this and it appears to work just fine.

                         

                        Here are the two links that helped me though this:

                        http://shareee.netne.net/wordpress/?p=5

                         

                        http://www.chibios.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=chibios:guides:stlink_eclipse

                         

                        Additionally you will note that the example program has Atolloc copyright headers in there stating the files can only be used with their compiler – turns out these are just basically copies of the files that STM gives away for free that do the same things. You can pull the original files out of the STM development SDK and have clean files, with a valid copyright in them.

                         

                        Once you do this everything should work just fine. I’ve been able to download and debug here without issue. I haven’t hit the 32K code limit mark, but since you are using the open source GCC compilers instead of the ones modified by a company to include limitations there shouldn’t be any code limits.

                         

                        Thanks,

                        Lloyd

                         

                        From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dick Curtiss
                        Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2012 12:21 PM
                        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                         

                         

                        I am currently working with the STM32F4-Discovery board (about $15) and so far have not been disappointed.  Previously, I worked with the PSoC 5 First Touch board, a $50 item.  The PSoC was easier going because the support software (drivers for functional components) is more advanced than the peripheral driver modules provided for the STM32.  Signal routing to pins and peripheral initialization has to be coded manually for the STM32, whereas the PSoC IDE automates that.  Also, the IDE for the PSoC was no additional cost and has no limitations, whereas the STM32 no-cost IDEs that I’ve tried limit code generation to 32K.

                         

                        STM32 IDEs:

                        I first tried Atollic’s TrueSTUDIO, which pops up annoying reminders to buy the very expensive professional version.  I am now trying Keil’s uVision 4, which so far has not popped up any reminders.  The editor in TrueSTUDIO is more helpful (intellisense) than that in uVision 4 (perhaps I haven’t learned enough about using it).  Both have debuggers for code running on the processor.  TASKING and EWARM, the other two IDEs supported in the application examples, have not been investigated.  I think open-source tools are also available, but haven’t looked into it.

                         

                        Dick Curtiss

                         


                        From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wes Edwards
                        Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:38 PM
                        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                         

                         

                        I'm also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful.  I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with arduino-level AVR's for sub-systems, but I'm now looking for a board for a smaller table-top robot.  It doesn't have to run linux, but a small board like a Raspberry Pi is attractive.

                         

                        Does anyone have any experience/ opinion on the STM Discovery board?  The cost of the board looks very attractive with some nice features but I don't know what other costs are involved.  I'd be looking to use a free toolchain (gcc, eclipse, ??) with it if possible.  Debugging is possible but I don't know what additional costs are associated to use it - eg do I need some commercial hardware).

                        http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp

                         

                        Wes

                         

                         

                        From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad garton
                        Sent: Wednesday, 2 May 2012 2:44 p.m.
                        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations

                         

                         


                        >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
                        can get videos on Youtube [...]

                        >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                        was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                        sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                        better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.

                        Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                        favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                        there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                        an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                        than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                        size of the XM) if that matters in the design.

                        Here are the I/Os:

                        Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                        3.3V I/O on all signals
                        McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                        AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
                        EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,

                        (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                        and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                        which seems pretty handy for moving code around.

                        It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                        from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                        tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                        with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                        stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                        be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                        be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                        many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                        capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                        expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                        if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                        really need more I/O than that for this project.

                        On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                        on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                        Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                        but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                        version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                        would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                        as far as I know.)

                        I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                        but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                        saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                        be patient on that one.

                        I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                        figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.

                        I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                        GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                        options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                        yet. I'm having too much fun playing.

                        B

                        ------------------------------------

                        Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links

                      • ListServ
                        At some point, it makes more sense to me to develop on a phone. The phone has high-level connectivity, up to Ghz speeds, massive storage, and good tool
                        Message 11 of 15 , May 8, 2012
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                          At some point, it makes more sense to me to develop on a phone. The phone has high-level connectivity, up to Ghz speeds, massive storage, and good tool support. The difficulty is finding a way to link it to your I/O. Some phones do serial,
                          most do bluetooth. Android phones have the option of IOIO.
                          http://ytai-mer.blogspot.com/2011/04/meet-ioio-io-for-android.html

                          Thanks
                          Barrie

                          On , "Lloyd Moore moorel3-at-comcast.net |Listserv|" <q5r4lx3d7t@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > I happen to be starting to work with the STM32 series as well and found the development tools to be WAY expensive. There is an alternative however, there are instructions on the web for setting up a free tool chain that doesn’t have any limitations. I’ve done this and it appears to work just fine.  Here are the two links that helped me though this:http://shareee.netne.net/wordpress/?p=5 http://www.chibios.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=chibios:guides:stlink_eclipse Additionally you will note that the example program has Atolloc copyright headers in there stating the files can only be used with their compiler – turns out these are just basically copies of the files that STM gives away for free that do the same things. You can pull the original files out of the STM development SDK and have clean files, with a valid copyright in them. Once you do this everything should work just fine. I’ve been able to download and debug here without issue. I haven’t hit the 32K code limit mark, but since you are using the open source GCC compilers instead of the ones modified by a company to include limitations there shouldn’t be any code limits. Thanks,Lloyd
                          >  From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dick Curtiss
                          > Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2012 12:21 PM
                          > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations
                          >
                          >    I am currently working with the STM32F4-Discovery board (about $15) and so far have not been disappointed.  Previously, I worked with the PSoC 5 First Touch board, a $50 item.  The PSoC was easier going because the support software (drivers for functional components) is more advanced than the peripheral driver modules provided for the STM32.  Signal routing to pins and peripheral initialization has to be coded manually for the STM32, whereas the PSoC IDE automates that.  Also, the IDE for the PSoC was no additional cost and has no limitations, whereas the STM32 no-cost IDEs that I’ve tried limit code generation to 32K. STM32 IDEs:I first tried Atollic’s TrueSTUDIO, which pops up annoying reminders to buy the very expensive professional version.  I am now trying Keil’s uVision 4, which so far has not popped up any reminders.  The editor in TrueSTUDIO is more helpful (intellisense) than that in uVision 4 (perhaps I haven’t learned enough about using it).  Both have debuggers for code running on the processor.  TASKING and EWARM, the other two IDEs supported in the application examples, have not been investigated.  I think open-source tools are also available, but haven’t looked into it. Dick Curtiss 
                          > From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wes Edwards
                          > Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 8:38 PM
                          > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations
                          >    I'm also looking at moving up from my Arduino clone to something a bit more powerful.  I have a large robot running ROS on Linux on an Atom-based PC with arduino-level AVR's for sub-systems, but I'm now looking for a board for a smaller table-top robot.  It doesn't have to run linux, but a small board like a Raspberry Pi is attractive. Does anyone have any experience/ opinion on the STM Discovery board?  The cost of the board looks very attractive with some nice features but I don't know what other costs are involved.  I'd be looking to use a free toolchain (gcc, eclipse, ??) with it if possible.  Debugging is possible but I don't know what additional costs are associated to use it - eg do I need some commercial hardware).http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp Wes  From: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad garton
                          > Sent: Wednesday, 2 May 2012 2:44 p.m.
                          > To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] Re: ARM processor Reccomendations
                          >
                          >   
                          >
                          > >> [...] Both the BeagleBone and BeagleBoard > XM are widely used and you
                          > can get videos on Youtube [...]
                          >
                          > >I agree orig Beagle and Beagle XM are widely used, but I didn't think Bone
                          > was that widely distributed yet. I've yet to get a BeagleBone, but they do
                          > sound interesting. OP wanted a box with room to grow, so isn't the Beagle XM
                          > better than the Bone? I thought Bone was trimmed done XM.
                          >
                          > Yup BB doesn't have as much on it as an XM. It seems to be at all my
                          > favorite distributors so it would seem to have a pretty healthy stock out
                          > there. If I couldn't make do with the I/Os below I would definitely go with
                          > an XM, or that Panda board (2 ARMS! Sweet!). The BB is a little smaller
                          > than an Arduino Mega card (1cm shorter than the mega, and about half the
                          > size of the XM) if that matters in the design.
                          >
                          > Here are the I/Os:
                          >
                          > Power 5V, 3.3V , VDD_ADC
                          > 3.3V I/O on all signals
                          > McASP0, SPI1, I2C, GPIO(65), LCD, GPMC, MMC1, MMC2, 7
                          > AIN(1.8V MAX), 4 Timers, 3 Serial Ports, CAN0,
                          > EHRPWM(0,2),XDMA Interrupt, Power button, Battery Charger,
                          >
                          > (This is the expansion connectors A, B) there are also a USB in for power
                          > and programming, Ethernet and a USB out. It also has a micro SD connector
                          > which seems pretty handy for moving code around.
                          >
                          > It's a little cheaper than the XM at 89.00. There are a ton of tools for it
                          > from what I can tell so far, but I haven't done much with it..yet. I'm still
                          > tinkering with Sensor code on the Arduino right now for fun. The BB comes
                          > with an Angstrom Linux distro, and seems fairly easy to use the cloud 9 IDE
                          > stuff. I probably will use Eclipse and gcc instead but it's there and might
                          > be helpful if you are use to the Arduino or something similar. There seem to
                          > be several shield like boards (capes) though I doubt you will see nearly as
                          > many capes as shields. I think with I2C and one of the expansion breakout
                          > capes, it would be easy enough to add Grove sensors or Pmods for whatever
                          > expansion you want but probably cheap enough to use the bigger board upfront
                          > if you need the I/O. I like the flexibility of smallish boards, and I didn't
                          > really need more I/O than that for this project.
                          >
                          > On a completely different note, I have a PIC32 based chipKits board (max32)
                          > on the way. It is a 32 bit board with an IDE that is identical to the
                          > Arduino. One of the TRG guys swears by it, and loves Microchip for support,
                          > but it's a MIPS core. It does accept Mega shields and there is a Uno sized
                          > version that takes Uno shields as well. If I didn't need a full Linux I
                          > would look at that one too. (It has no MMU and they don't plan to add one
                          > as far as I know.)
                          >
                          > I ordered a Raspberry in march some time and the delivery date was August,
                          > but recently some folks that got August dates at first, are getting notes
                          > saying July now. Sadly, I'm not one of those people. For 35.00 bucks I can
                          > be patient on that one.
                          >
                          > I see I've again got carried away. I've just spent a lot of time trying to
                          > figure this which controller to use thing for the last month myself.
                          >
                          > I have to say after having been away from development for 10+ years, it's a
                          > GREAT time to do development! So many very nice, cheap and easy to use
                          > options now. I've ordered several but haven't picked a winner myself just
                          > yet. I'm having too much fun playing.
                          >
                          > B
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.orgYahoo! Groups Links
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