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robomagellan question

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  • dan michaels
    Offhand, given past events, about how fast does a Robomagellan vehicle have to move to be competitive? Is 3-fps too slow?
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 12, 2011
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      Offhand, given past events, about how fast does a Robomagellan
      vehicle have to move to be competitive? Is 3-fps too slow?
    • twcarroll@aol.com
      oric_dan@yahoo.com writes: Offhand, given past events, about how fast does a Robomagellan vehicle have to move to be competitive? Is 3-fps too slow? Three
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 13, 2011
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        oric_dan@... writes:
        Offhand, given past events, about how fast does a Robomagellan vehicle have to move to be competitive? Is 3-fps too slow?
             Three feet per second is certainly not too slow for the competition.  A few are a bit faster though most are slower.  Speed helps a lot in achieving points, but accuracy in detecting the three or more 'goals' is also important.  You'll have the chance to determine, on your own, just where the goals are located and to read the location's coordinates with your own hand-held GPS device, and you must remember, some of the cones are not visible from the starting point.  Good programming and a GPS sensor that can receive all of the needed satellite signals throughout the course is important.  Wet trees and tall buildings (and Space Needles) create GPS havoc.  If you're competing at the SRS Robothon and will be operating on the grass outside, you need to have a good robot base with fairly large tires and few appendages to catch on obstacles such as bushes and similar things.  Differential steering works well though some of the best have used Ackermann steering that is a bit harder to drive with a typical microcontroller.
             Good Luck,
             Tom C.


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      • dan michaels
        ... Thanks Tom, I figure the strategy people would use would be to drive towards the waypoints as fast as possible, and then slow down and zero in. In any
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 13, 2011
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          --- In SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com, twcarroll@... wrote:
          >



          Thanks Tom, I figure the strategy people would use would be to
          drive towards the waypoints as fast as possible, and then slow
          down and zero in. In any case, I live near a good sized park
          and thought I would play around with some GPS stuff. Use rocks,
          trees, garbage cans for waypoints. Get the coordinates off
          of google. Also, try out some IMU stuff, and see what dpa and
          Randy are always raving about. Got to do something to get away
          from those little PIC16F877's, and graduate to "real" processors.
          YAPIQ = yet another project in the queue. :)



          > oric_dan@... writes:
          >
          > Offhand, given past events, about how fast does a Robomagellan vehicle > have to move to be competitive? Is 3-fps too slow?
          > Three feet per second is certainly not too slow for the competition. > A few are a bit faster though most are slower. Speed helps a lot in > achieving points, but accuracy in detecting the three or more 'goals' is also > important. You'll have the chance to determine, on your own, just where the
          > goals are located and to read the location's coordinates with your own > hand-held GPS device, and you must remember, some of the cones are not visible > from the starting point. Good programming and a GPS sensor that can > receive all of the needed satellite signals throughout the course is important. > Wet trees and tall buildings (and Space Needles) create GPS havoc. If
          > you're competing at the SRS Robothon and will be operating on the grass > outside, you need to have a good robot base with fairly large tires and few > appendages to catch on obstacles such as bushes and similar things. Differential > steering works well though some of the best have used Ackermann steering > that is a bit harder to drive with a typical microcontroller.
          > Good Luck,
          > Tom C.
          >
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