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Re: [SeattleRobotics] Re: robot legs and wheels on challenging terrain

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  • ed@okerson.com
    Hey, ... Maybe a gait like this? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaQw9V4Upj4 Ed Okerson
    Message 1 of 45 , Jan 1, 2011
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      Hey,

      > Howdy,
      >
      > --- In SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Clark <dlc@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Peter,
      >>
      >> You bring up an interesting point. Are we looking at this problem in the
      >> right way? We see a mountain goat standing on some rocks and think "we
      >> need legs to do that". Do we? Balance isn't the issue, everyone (of us)
      >> knows the inverted pendulum. Maybe we should be thinking in terms of the
      >> desired outcome instead of the mechanics of what Mother Nature has done.
      >> Sticky wheels, vacuum cups, hooked spikes, maybe air-lift generators in
      >> combination with wheels. Heck, maybe wheels on the ends of legs!
      >
      >
      > Interesting thought. Suppose a 4 legged robot with wheels for feet.
      > Shoes, if you will. Lock the wheels in place for walking. Drive the
      > wheels for rolling. Maybe even mix the two for as yet un-imagined gaits.

      Maybe a gait like this?

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaQw9V4Upj4

      Ed Okerson
    • David Buckley
      Lack of interest is a good question. Back in 2005 A workshop was organised by Geoff Pegmanon of R U RobotsLimited, held on 1st December 05 at Salford
      Message 45 of 45 , Jan 4, 2011
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        Lack of interest is a good question.
        Back in 2005 A workshop was organised by Geoff Pegmanon of R U RobotsLimited, held on 1st December 05 at Salford University, it was centred on future robotics research and development opportunities and aimed at both industrial and academic participation.
        Following it I sent a proposal for a biped robot competition.
        Geoff Pegmanon said he circulated it but never received any interest.
        At its simplest a radio controlled Bigfoot/Toddler with a gripper could have been entered!
        I think it was too hard for those attending the workshop.
        David
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2011 7:23 PM
        Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] robot legs and wheels on challenging terrain

         

        The original intent for the Walking Robot Race for the Robothon was for Humanoid
        robots. We opened it up to all walkers so that they would have a contest to
        compete in. Unfortunately, my robots were the only bipeds to enter the race.

        If you can't get people to bring in a humanoid robot for a simple straight line
        race, how do you get them motivated to enter one for something more complext.

        I don't know why people don't get them to do more. I know there are a lot of
        SRS members that have them. We just don't see them. I tried to get some
        interest in a more agressive contest by entering in one into the 3 kg sumo
        event. Yes it lost to the other wheeled robots, but I was trying to demonstrate
        that it could survive the event without any real damage, and it did. But still,
        no further interest.

        For the most part, the walking robots that we build, humanoid/quad/hex, are not
        going to progress beyond flat smooth surfaces until we are willing to risk
        breaking the robot many times going after the rough terrain. Until then, they
        make great dust collectors on the shelves. Which is a shame. We build them,
        then get worried about breaking them, and move them to the shelves until we get
        bored of them. The fate of all robots.

        Pete

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Mark Kenworthy
        To: SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, December 31, 2010 3:46 PM
        Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] robot legs and wheels on challenging terrain

        I think they are blended operation. RC but with software and sensors to augment
        the control. As I understand it they have automatic routines for things like
        standing up, using the 3-axis accelerometer sensor to determine what way they
        are laying down.

        I think it would be cool to have events like the humanoid obstacle course at
        Robothon.

        Mark

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