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Boost Converter?

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  • David Peterson
    Anyone have any ideas on designing a boost converter? Specifically taking either a 4.8 volt or 9.6 volt NiCad source and stepping it up to 24 to 30 volts, at
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2000
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      Anyone have any ideas on designing a boost converter? Specifically taking
      either a 4.8 volt or 9.6 volt NiCad source and stepping it up to 24 to 30
      volts, at perhaps around 1 to 1.5 amps (not mA, but A).? Any available off
      the shelf surplus? Just looking for a DC motor supply, any help appreciated.
    • Bryan E. Daniel
      Hello SRS, and David Peterson, That will draw about six to nine amps from your 4.8v nicad batteries. ! An oscillator driven transformer can supply power
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 30, 2000
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        Hello SRS, and David Peterson,
        That will draw about six to nine amps from your 4.8v nicad batteries. !
        An oscillator driven transformer can supply power loads.
        If you need DC output, the AC from the secondary of the transformer will need to
        be rectified.
        If you consider efficiency, your battery current might be nine to twelve amps
        with the lowest voltage input you suggest.
        Industrial controller panels sometimes use DC - DC converters.
        They are fairly compact little boxes and are heavy.
        You might try a search of the web.
        Some possible sources might be GE, Westinghouse, Square D, or Allen Bradley.
        You may want to take the higher voltage directly from batteries.
        Bryan E. Daniel
        Bellevue, Washington


        David Peterson wrote:

        > Anyone have any ideas on designing a boost converter? Specifically taking
        > either a 4.8 volt or 9.6 volt NiCad source and stepping it up to 24 to 30
        > volts, at perhaps around 1 to 1.5 amps (not mA, but A).? Any available off
        > the shelf surplus? Just looking for a DC motor supply, any help appreciated.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      • Randy Carter
        your probably looking at a DC/DC converter in the 24 to 36 watt ($100 to $200) range. One thing to keep in mind is that power out = power in minus efficiency.
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 1, 2000
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          your probably looking at a DC/DC converter in the 24 to 36 watt
          ($100 to $200) range. One thing to keep in mind is that power
          out = power in minus efficiency. Assuming 100% efficiency and 24
          watt output we get output-> 24V @ 1A and the input-> 4.8V @ 5A.
          This input power gets worse when you factor in less than 100%
          efficiency.

          How long were you planning to run this robot on a single charge?

          David Peterson wrote:
          >
          > Anyone have any ideas on designing a boost converter? Specifically taking
          > either a 4.8 volt or 9.6 volt NiCad source and stepping it up to 24 to 30
          > volts, at perhaps around 1 to 1.5 amps (not mA, but A).? Any available off
          > the shelf surplus? Just looking for a DC motor supply, any help appreciated.
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@egroups.com
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