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Re: [SeattleRobotics] Soldering down TQFP packages

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  • Brian Dean
    Larry, ... Is this kind ve what you re describing? This is how I do the ATmega128 TQFP. Takes only a minute or two and I never have bridges:
    Message 1 of 3 , May 31, 2006
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      Larry,

      On Fri, May 26, 2006 at 12:34:41PM -0700, Larry Barello wrote:

      > I think I might have just discovered a clever way to solder down large pin
      > count TQFP packages.
      >
      > I was replacing a 64 pin TQFP mega128 processor. I cut the leads with my
      > trusty dull exacto knife, daubed on some no-clean flux, removed all the lead
      > ends (and made the pads all shiny). Then some more flux and tack the chip
      > down on one end by soldering one pin.
      >
      > In soldering down the opposite corner, I made a big goober of solder on a
      > couple pins so I pulled out some stranded wire to make a solder wick. And
      > when I wicked off the blob I noticed that about three or four pins looked
      > perfectly soldered down.
      >
      > Then I loaded up the wick with solder, pressed it up against the pins/pad,
      > heated until the solder melted and then dragged the wick across all the
      > pins. WOW. Beautiful, shiny, just enough solder to fill in all area
      > between pad and pin, no hint of bridging, joints. It looks just like it did
      > the day it came out of the oven (except for a bit of no-clean flux on the
      > board).

      Is this kind've what you're describing? This is how I do the
      ATmega128 TQFP. Takes only a minute or two and I never have bridges:

      http://www.bdmicro.com/smt

      Click on the image image of the ATmega128 which will play a movie of
      the technique. It's really very easy!

      Also, further down the page you'll find an easy way to SMT solder even
      the tiniest flecks of SMD caps and resistors.

      I _much_ prefer to solder SMT by hand than through hole. Once you do
      a few boards, it's much quicker and more reliable. No leads to trim
      or fight with trying to get them to fit into the holes.

      -Brian
      --
      Brian Dean
      ATmega128 based MAVRIC controllers
      http://www.bdmicro.com/
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