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Does anyone know of a Servo Control Authority?

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  • leehearn82
    Hey, This may seem to be a strange question, and I am sure that most of us know how to control a servo, but is there any official authority on the matter. I
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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      Hey,

      This may seem to be a strange question, and I am sure that most of us
      know how to control a servo, but is there any official authority on
      the matter. I am trying to find an official reference to a control
      method for servo's, and cant seem to find one anywhere.

      I have managed to locate a large number of servo's and there
      associated control methods, but is there like a governing body that
      has a specification or even a guideline stating the voltage's and
      pulse widths and time periods and there tolerances?

      Hope someone knows, coz its got me.

      Thanks heaps
      Lee.
    • tbrenke@verizon.net
      off hand, I would say no. most are modeled after the RC radios. 1-2mS pulse repeated at least every 30mS 1.5mS center. if you can run the pulses closer
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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        off hand, I would say no.
        most are modeled after the RC radios.
        1-2mS pulse repeated at least every 30mS
        1.5mS center.

        if you can run the pulses closer together, then you can get more torque
        from the same servo.



        leehearn82 wrote:

        >Hey,
        >
        >This may seem to be a strange question, and I am sure that most of us
        >know how to control a servo, but is there any official authority on
        >the matter. I am trying to find an official reference to a control
        >method for servo's, and cant seem to find one anywhere.
        >
        >I have managed to locate a large number of servo's and there
        >associated control methods, but is there like a governing body that
        >has a specification or even a guideline stating the voltage's and
        >pulse widths and time periods and there tolerances?
        >
        >Hope someone knows, coz its got me.
        >
        >Thanks heaps
        >Lee.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Mr S
        Try checking the official routes. People who fly R/C planes a lot have licenses from the FAA, and just guessing from that, if you search that route, you might
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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          Try checking the official routes. People who fly R/C
          planes a lot have licenses from the FAA, and just
          guessing from that, if you search that route, you
          might find an official guide to model plane
          operations, and thus a guide for servo standards. I'll
          ask an R/C friend of mine if he knows... he has one of
          those FAA licenses, or whatever license it is. He has
          to be insured to fly a couple of his models as they
          are huge.

          --- "tbrenke@..." <tbrenke@...> wrote:

          > off hand, I would say no.
          > most are modeled after the RC radios.
          > 1-2mS pulse repeated at least every 30mS
          > 1.5mS center.
          >
          > if you can run the pulses closer together, then you
          > can get more torque
          > from the same servo.
          >
          >
          >
          > leehearn82 wrote:
          >
          > >Hey,
          > >
          > >This may seem to be a strange question, and I am
          > sure that most of us
          > >know how to control a servo, but is there any
          > official authority on
          > >the matter. I am trying to find an official
          > reference to a control
          > >method for servo's, and cant seem to find one
          > anywhere.
          > >
          > >I have managed to locate a large number of servo's
          > and there
          > >associated control methods, but is there like a
          > governing body that
          > >has a specification or even a guideline stating the
          > voltage's and
          > >pulse widths and time periods and there tolerances?
          > >
          > >Hope someone knows, coz its got me.
          > >
          > >Thanks heaps
          > >Lee.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > Visit the SRS Website at
          > http://www.seattlerobotics.org
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >




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        • tbrenke@verizon.net
          the license is the AMA American or armature model assoc.
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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            the license is the AMA
            American or armature model assoc.

            Mr S wrote:

            >Try checking the official routes. People who fly R/C
            >planes a lot have licenses from the FAA, and just
            >guessing from that, if you search that route, you
            >might find an official guide to model plane
            >operations, and thus a guide for servo standards. I'll
            >ask an R/C friend of mine if he knows... he has one of
            >those FAA licenses, or whatever license it is. He has
            >to be insured to fly a couple of his models as they
            >are huge.
            >
            >--- "tbrenke@..." <tbrenke@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Rich Chandler
            ... Academy of Model Aeronautics. Mostly it s a club for group access to insurance against model accidents. -- From Each according to his Abilities, To Each
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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              At 5:54 AM -0700 6/1/05, tbrenke@... wrote:
              >the license is the AMA
              >American or armature model assoc.

              Academy of Model Aeronautics. Mostly it's a club for group access to
              insurance against model accidents.
              --
              "From Each according to his Abilities, To Each according to his
              Needs" is a pretty sweet deal, if you're a needy incompetent, but it
              makes a slave of the capable and independent. Advocating such a
              position says an awful lot about the individual who does so, and
              which side of the equation he expects to be on.
              - Richard Chandler (10/15/04)
              Using Outlook or Netscape for news? Learn to turn off HTML posting at:
              http://www.expita.com/nomime.html
            • Mr S
              The AMA member that I know says that there doesn t seem to be any standard for control of servos. Apparently all the manufacturers seemed to do their own
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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                The AMA member that I know says that there doesn't
                seem to be any standard for control of servos.
                Apparently all the manufacturers seemed to do their
                own variation some years ago. Its only recently become
                a more standard kind of interfacing process.

                --- Rich Chandler <rchandler@...> wrote:

                > At 5:54 AM -0700 6/1/05, tbrenke@... wrote:
                > >the license is the AMA
                > >American or armature model assoc.
                >
                > Academy of Model Aeronautics. Mostly it's a club
                > for group access to
                > insurance against model accidents.
                > --
                > "From Each according to his Abilities, To Each
                > according to his
                > Needs" is a pretty sweet deal, if you're a needy
                > incompetent, but it
                > makes a slave of the capable and independent.
                > Advocating such a
                > position says an awful lot about the individual who
                > does so, and
                > which side of the equation he expects to be on.
                > - Richard Chandler (10/15/04)
                > Using Outlook or Netscape for news? Learn to turn
                > off HTML posting at:
                > http://www.expita.com/nomime.html
                >
                >
                > Visit the SRS Website at
                > http://www.seattlerobotics.org
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


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              • Nate W
                Almost all of the RC servos on the market today use the signaling protocol that tbrenke@verizon.net described earlier: a 1-2 millisecond pulse repeated 40-60
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 1, 2005
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                  Almost all of the RC servos on the market today use the signaling
                  protocol that tbrenke@... described earlier: a 1-2 millisecond
                  pulse repeated 40-60 times per second; a 1.5 millisecond pulse tells
                  the servo to move to center. Futaba and JR have different opinions
                  about whether a longer pulse means clockwise or counter-clockwise
                  rotation, but other than that they're all compatible.

                  There are many good web pages out there that explain the details, here's one:
                  http://www.dprg.org/projects/2003-05a/

                  There are a few servos on the market that support much higher
                  signaling rates - high-end servos intended for use with gyro sensors
                  for tail rotor pitch control servos for RC helicopters. Most of those
                  are still backward compatible with the signaling described above - the
                  Futaba 9251 may not be, but I'm not certain.

                  On 6/1/05, Mr S <szinn_the1@...> wrote:
                  > The AMA member that I know says that there doesn't
                  > seem to be any standard for control of servos.
                  > Apparently all the manufacturers seemed to do their
                  > own variation some years ago. Its only recently become
                  > a more standard kind of interfacing process.


                  --
                  Nate Waddoups
                  Redmond WA USA
                  http://www.natew.com/ <== for nerds
                  http://www.featherforum.com/ <== for birds
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