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Re: why emote?

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  • Bruce J. Weimer, MD
    Dan Michaels wrote: Herbert Simon, I think, long ago made a distinction between motivation and emotion - but I don t remember the details. IOW, it would be
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 31, 2003
      Dan Michaels wrote:
      Herbert Simon, I think, long ago made a distinction between motivation and emotion - but I don't remember the details. IOW, it would be possible to add all kinds of motivational faculties to a robot or AI without having them produce responses in animals that might be considered emotional.

      Do you perceive a difference between motivation and emotion?


      Bruce replies:
      Yes, I agree that there is (or rather can be) a difference between motivation and emotion. For example, there are certainly situations where purely logical reasoning motivates an appropriate action. However, my point was simply that emotion might ALSO be used to motivate an action. And, I suspect, that might add complexity and therefore "color" to the behavior.

      This is then one of the areas that I'm currently trying to investigate.

      By the way, Herb Simon was one of my instructors. ; - )

      Bruce.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dan michaels
      ... motivation and emotion - but I don t remember the details. IOW, it would be possible to add all kinds of motivational faculties to a robot or AI without
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 1 9:42 AM
        --- In SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce J. Weimer, MD"
        <weimer@m...> wrote:
        > Dan Michaels wrote:
        > Herbert Simon, I think, long ago made a distinction between
        motivation and emotion - but I don't remember the details. IOW, it
        would be possible to add all kinds of motivational faculties to a
        robot or AI without having them produce responses in animals that
        might be considered emotional.
        >
        > Do you perceive a difference between motivation and emotion?
        >
        >
        > Bruce replies:
        > Yes, I agree that there is (or rather can be) a difference between
        motivation and emotion. For example, there are certainly situations
        where purely logical reasoning motivates an appropriate action.
        However, my point was simply that emotion might ALSO be used to
        motivate an action. And, I suspect, that might add complexity and
        therefore "color" to the behavior.
        >
        > This is then one of the areas that I'm currently trying to
        investigate.
        >
        > By the way, Herb Simon was one of my instructors. ; - )
        >
        > Bruce.


        In one of the other forums, there was a long discussion about the
        usefulness of having motivational inputs as a key feature for getting
        an AI off the ground [figuratively speaking] and actually doing
        something actively - as opposed to simply being a passive responder.

        This seems very useful, however, it's not overwhelming clear that
        emotional thought, per se, would be especially helpful for an AI. "Oh
        dear, I'm gonna die. My heart is pounding ... run, run". Seems you
        can accomplish the same thing [run, run] without all the hysteria. ;-)

        So, did I remember H.Simon correctly as being the one who made the
        distinction as cited?


        - dan michaels
        ===========================
      • Bruce J. Weimer, MD
        Dan Michaels wrote: In one of the other forums, there was a long discussion about the usefulness of having motivational inputs as a key feature for getting an
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 2 12:15 PM
          Dan Michaels wrote:
          In one of the other forums, there was a long discussion about the usefulness of having motivational inputs as a key feature for getting an AI off the ground [figuratively speaking] and actually doing something actively - as opposed to simply being a passive responder.

          This seems very useful, however, it's not overwhelming clear that emotional thought, per se, would be especially helpful for an AI. "Oh dear, I'm gonna die. My heart is pounding ... run, run". Seems you can accomplish the same thing [run, run] without all the hysteria. ;-)

          So, did I remember H.Simon correctly as being the one who made the distinction as cited?


          Bruce replies:
          We seem to agree that "motivation" might be a useful construct in an AI robot application - and of course there's more than one way to program "motivation". In fact, in some situations it might be preferable for a robot to react in an unemotional "reptilian" way relying only on logic. Then again, in a different situation and perhaps in a different application, it might be preferable for a robot to respond in more of a "mammalian" emotional way. Logic MIGHT be more efficient, but which behavior is more INTERESTING?

          And besides, Kirk always beat Spock at chess. (just kidding!)

          As far as the reference by Herb Simon - I honestly don't know if he said it or not...I don't remember ever discussing it with him..


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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