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Re: [SeattleRobotics] electronics

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  • Kenneth Maxon
    I ll second this one. Order the Past 8 years of Circuit Cellar Ink on CD and spend a few months catching up. As you learn more, twice a year go back and
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 2, 2003
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      I'll second this one. Order the Past 8 years of Circuit Cellar Ink on CD
      and spend a few months catching up. As you learn more, twice a year go back
      and re-read them. You'll learn / understand more of what you read and gain
      new understandings each time. Over the past years this magazine has been an
      invaluable wealth of information on embedded processors and electronics. It
      is even worth going down to a public library and digging out the circuit
      cellar column from Byte magazine as well. Learning the basics from the
      stand point of programmable logic being in its infancy or autorouting
      technology etc can really go a long way to understanding the complex beasts
      that they've grown into today.

      -Kenneth
      (Unit 3's in trouble and it's scared out of its wits) -Geddy Lee
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <jamesfit@...>
      To: <02, 2003 3:10 PM
      Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] electronics


      > I can also vouch for this book. I have just got a copy and it is a great
      > resource. They write in an easy to read style (for a text book ;-) and it
      is
      > definiately understandable by a beginner.
      >
      > I would also suggest reading Circuit Cellar. It is significantly more
      technical,
      > however it has some quite interesting articles and you will be surprised
      how
      > much you pickup from reading it.
      >
      > Best of luck,
      > James Fitzsimons
      >
      >
      > Quoting Lyle Joseph Chamberlain <lyle@...>:
      >
      > > Horowitz and Hill, "The Art of Electronics," Cambridge Press, is an
      > > EXCELLENT circuit design book. Most of the students here at Caltech,
      > > including myself, swear by it. It has a lot of practical information,
      > > and
      > > they go out of their way to explain the basics. It contians a LOT of
      > > circuit designs, though some of them are a bit outdated. But if you're
      > > a
      > > beginner then you won't care anyway.
      > >
      > > Good luck!
      > >
      > > -Lyle
      > >
      > >
      > > On Wed, 2 Jul 2003, Tom Capon wrote:
      > >
      > > > Well, to start with, have you read The TAB Electronics Guide to
      > > > Understanding Electricity and Electronics by G. Randy Slone? It
      > > explains
      > > > all the basic stuff as well as including lots of circuits and
      > > explaining
      > > > them. I've basically taught myself a lot of circuit design simply by
      > > > cruising the web and looking at other people's circuits, comparing
      > > them
      > > > with ones that I already know how they work, etc. Personally I don't
      > > know
      > > > of any other books that deal specifically with circuit design, though
      > > I'm
      > > > sure someone else on the list will come up with some. :-) --Tom
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > At 06:31 PM 7/2/2003 +0000, keethrus3 wrote:
      > > > >Hello,
      > > > >
      > > > > Im in my last year of college, majoring in Computer Science, but Im
      > > > >really interested in robotics and electronics. Ive tried to teach
      > > > >myself but I cant really find any good books/online-tutorials that
      > > > >deal with circuit design and/or explains advanced electronic
      > > details.
      > > > >I understand Voltage, Resistance, Current, Capacitors,
      > > > >Coils/Inductance, and Transistors to the point of knowing what they
      > > > >are and what they do - However, being able to tell why they're put
      > > > >together when looking at a schematic or being able to create my own
      > > > >circuitry I cant do. Anybody have any good suggestions on how to
      > > > >learn circuit design? Any good self-teaching books? I really want to
      > > > >get into robotics/electronics but I dont want to be stuck using
      > > other
      > > > >people's circuits and just plugging them together.
      > > > >
      > > > > - jeremiah
      > > > > http://inlovewithGod.com
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
      > > > >
      > > > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > > >SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
      > > >
      > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
      > >
      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • Kristoffer Gauksheim
      The Art of Electronics is a great book and if you are looking for a little more hand-holding than it provides, there is a companion Student Manual by Hayes and
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 3, 2003
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        The Art of Electronics is a great book and if you are looking for a little
        more hand-holding than it provides, there is a companion Student Manual by
        Hayes and Horowitz. The Student Manual explains some points in more detail
        or in a different manner, and focuses on the most important subject matter
        for a newcomer. It also has labs you could do to practice and learn (the
        later ones are a little out of date).

        I had the pleasure of taking the class the book is based on from Hayes and
        Horowitz, and am glad to see the Caltech guys enjoy the book as well. :)

        Cheers,
        Kris


        >From: jamesfit@...
        >To: "SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com" <SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: Re: [SeattleRobotics] electronics
        >Date: Thu, 03 Jul 2003 10:10:33 +1200 (NZST)
        >
        >I can also vouch for this book. I have just got a copy and it is a great
        >resource. They write in an easy to read style (for a text book ;-) and it
        >is
        >definiately understandable by a beginner.
        >
        >I would also suggest reading Circuit Cellar. It is significantly more
        >technical,
        >however it has some quite interesting articles and you will be surprised
        >how
        >much you pickup from reading it.
        >
        >Best of luck,
        >James Fitzsimons
        >
        >
        >Quoting Lyle Joseph Chamberlain <lyle@...>:
        >
        > > Horowitz and Hill, "The Art of Electronics," Cambridge Press, is an
        > > EXCELLENT circuit design book. Most of the students here at Caltech,
        > > including myself, swear by it. It has a lot of practical information,
        > > and
        > > they go out of their way to explain the basics. It contians a LOT of
        > > circuit designs, though some of them are a bit outdated. But if you're
        > > a
        > > beginner then you won't care anyway.
        > >
        > > Good luck!
        > >
        > > -Lyle

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      • Rich Chandler
        I d like to add one slightly different prespective to this discussion. To get any practice Designing circuits , it helps to have an idea or a project first.
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 3, 2003
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          I'd like to add one slightly different prespective to this discussion.

          To get any practice "Designing circuits", it helps to have an idea or a project
          first. Books can teach you all the building blocks and techniques. But you
          don't read a Programming language book (Like, say, K&R for C) and learn how to
          program. You can't just sit down and write a program or build a circuit without
          having an idea first of what you want it to do. Learning the "How" is
          important, but you need to approach it with a "Why?" in mind.

          If you keep that frame of mind, cold equations change into something you can
          relate to, and your "Book learning" will also become your art.
        • Dave VanHorn
          ... Great book! If you can figure the bad ideas circuits at the end of the sections, you re ready to move on! Some are interestingly subtle, others are comic
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 3, 2003
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            At 01:14 AM 7/3/2003 -0700, Kristoffer Gauksheim wrote:
            >The Art of Electronics is a great book and if you are looking for a little
            >more hand-holding than it provides, there is a companion Student Manual by
            >Hayes and Horowitz.

            Great book!

            If you can figure the "bad ideas" circuits at the end of the sections,
            you're ready to move on!
            Some are interestingly subtle, others are comic relief. :)
          • Bryan Andersen
            ... Even with experience this is my first step. Why reinvent the wheel? I always look for existing designs before coming up with my own. The application
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 4, 2003
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              dan michaels wrote:

              > Seriously, if you are not trained in this, the best thing might be to
              > take one of those compressor courses, and then "start out" by using
              > other people's circuits after all. This way you will learn a lot as
              > you build and play with them. Then, you can use this knowledge to
              > bootstrap to your own circuit designs. If you find a shortcut to jump
              > the path, tell me about it.

              Even with experience this is my first step. Why reinvent the wheel? I
              always look for existing designs before coming up with my own. The
              application notes for chips use to be my only really good source, but
              then magazines started having circuit design articles, and now you can
              find them all over the web.

              I think one of the really key things is to be able to figure out how to
              break down tasks into small units. Then you solve each unit one by one.
              I'm right now in the process of solving the task of good high speed
              linear optical isolation. With some searching I found a board by
              Motorola that had skimatics. That lead to a part number which led to
              it's application notes. In those application notes were examples of
              many different ways to do the task. I thought I was going to need 3-4
              op-amps per link, but it turns out all I need is a couple of
              transistors, some resistors, capacitors and a photodiode based optical
              isolation chip that has an input side feadback diode.

              - Bryan
            • Larry Barello
              Breaking a task down is key, however, when starting you have no experience. So, start small. Build up a tool box of circuits and ideas. I do the same with
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 4, 2003
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                Breaking a task down is key, however, when starting you have no experience. So, start
                small. Build up a "tool box" of circuits and ideas. I do the same with software.
                Every year the code gets slicker and more sophisticated, but each year I only learn a
                couple new things. My code and hardware designs are an accumulation of stuff I learned
                each year. And, like Bryan, I always start by seeing if there is a good solution
                already out there I can copy.

                Figuring out and understanding how someone else's design works is pretty much how you
                learn this stuff. Each application note will have a tidbit of knowledge or theory. The
                really fundamental stuff can be picked up in a book like "Art of Electronics" - which is
                really a compilation of a lot of good ideas and why they work (and examples of bad ideas
                and why they are bad).

                Cheers!

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Bryan Andersen" <bryan@...>
                >
                > Even with experience this is my first step. Why reinvent the wheel? I
                > always look for existing designs before coming up with my own. The
                > application notes for chips use to be my only really good source, but
                > then magazines started having circuit design articles, and now you can
                > find them all over the web.
                >
                > I think one of the really key things is to be able to figure out how to
                > break down tasks into small units. Then you solve each unit one by one.
                > I'm right now in the process of solving the task of good high speed
                > linear optical isolation. With some searching I found a board by
                > Motorola that had skimatics. That lead to a part number which led to
                > it's application notes. In those application notes were examples of
                > many different ways to do the task. I thought I was going to need 3-4
                > op-amps per link, but it turns out all I need is a couple of
                > transistors, some resistors, capacitors and a photodiode based optical
                > isolation chip that has an input side feadback diode.
                >
                > - Bryan
              • Tom Capon
                This exactly how I am learning circuit design. It s taken a couple of years, but I m actually starting to get the hang of it. Just be patient.
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 4, 2003
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                  This exactly how I am learning circuit design. It's taken a couple of
                  years, but I'm actually starting to get the hang of it. Just be patient.

                  At 10:47 AM 7/4/2003 -0500, Bryan Andersen wrote:
                  >dan michaels wrote:
                  >
                  > > Seriously, if you are not trained in this, the best thing might be to
                  > > take one of those compressor courses, and then "start out" by using
                  > > other people's circuits after all. This way you will learn a lot as
                  > > you build and play with them. Then, you can use this knowledge to
                  > > bootstrap to your own circuit designs. If you find a shortcut to jump
                  > > the path, tell me about it.
                  >
                  >Even with experience this is my first step. Why reinvent the wheel? I
                  >always look for existing designs before coming up with my own. The
                  >application notes for chips use to be my only really good source, but
                  >then magazines started having circuit design articles, and now you can
                  >find them all over the web.
                  >
                  >I think one of the really key things is to be able to figure out how to
                  >break down tasks into small units. Then you solve each unit one by one.
                  > I'm right now in the process of solving the task of good high speed
                  >linear optical isolation. With some searching I found a board by
                  >Motorola that had skimatics. That lead to a part number which led to
                  >it's application notes. In those application notes were examples of
                  >many different ways to do the task. I thought I was going to need 3-4
                  >op-amps per link, but it turns out all I need is a couple of
                  >transistors, some resistors, capacitors and a photodiode based optical
                  >isolation chip that has an input side feadback diode.
                  >
                  >- Bryan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
                  >
                  >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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