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directional gearing

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  • usa.net
    I m a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I m curious if there are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one direction,
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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      I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm curious if there
      are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one
      direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other direction, a different
      gear turns.

      Are there resources on the web with information about mechanical problems and
      solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any introductions to
      mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)
    • Doug Kelley
      I ve heard good things about this book even though I haven t read it personally: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071361693/seattleroboticss/ Doug
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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        I've heard good things about this book even though I haven't read it personally:

        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071361693/seattleroboticss/

        Doug

        Fred Kerr (usa.net) <fkerr@...> writes:
        >I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm curious if there
        >are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one
        >direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other direction, a different
        >gear turns.
        >
        >Are there resources on the web with information about mechanical problems and
        >solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any introductions to
        >mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)
        >
        >
        >Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
      • Dave Hylands
        Hi Fred, Here are some Lego implementations: http://www.sonic.net/~rci/transmission.htm http://www.baumfamily.org/lego/creations/dirtrans/ (same idea as
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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          Hi Fred,

          Here are some Lego implementations:

          http://www.sonic.net/~rci/transmission.htm
          http://www.baumfamily.org/lego/creations/dirtrans/ (same idea as previous)

          http://member.nifty.ne.jp/mindstorms/gallery/k001e.html (a different
          approach)

          --
          Dave Hylands
          Vancouver, BC, Canada
          http://www.DaveHylands.com/


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Fred Kerr [mailto:fkerr@...]
          > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 7:05 AM
          > To:
          > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] directional gearing
          >
          >
          > I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm
          > curious if there
          > are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one
          > direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other
          > direction, a different
          > gear turns.
          >
          > Are there resources on the web with information about
          > mechanical problems and
          > solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any
          > introductions to
          > mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)
        • Tony Brenke
          the last approach is the most common that I have seen. your motor is connected to a gear. that gear is connected to an arm that has a meshed gear on the end.
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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            the last approach is the most common that I have seen.
            your motor is connected to a gear.
            that gear is connected to an arm that has a meshed gear on the end.
            when it turns coulter clockwise the movable arm rotates with the motor
            gear because of friction and engages the static gear on the left.
            when it turns coulter clockwise the movable arm rotates with the motor
            gear because of friction and engages the static gear on the right.



            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Dave Hylands" <dhylands@...>
            To: <seattlerobotics@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 9:42 AM
            Subject: RE: [SeattleRobotics] directional gearing


            > Hi Fred,
            >
            > Here are some Lego implementations:
            >
            > http://www.sonic.net/~rci/transmission.htm
            > http://www.baumfamily.org/lego/creations/dirtrans/ (same idea as previous)
            >
            > http://member.nifty.ne.jp/mindstorms/gallery/k001e.html (a different
            > approach)
            >
            > --
            > Dave Hylands
            > Vancouver, BC, Canada
            > http://www.DaveHylands.com/
            >
            >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: Fred Kerr [mailto:fkerr@...]
            > > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 7:05 AM
            > > To:
            > > Subject: [SeattleRobotics] directional gearing
            > >
            > >
            > > I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm
            > > curious if there
            > > are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one
            > > direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other
            > > direction, a different
            > > gear turns.
            > >
            > > Are there resources on the web with information about
            > > mechanical problems and
            > > solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any
            > > introductions to
            > > mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)
            >
            >
            > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          • twcarroll@aol.com
            One method of changing direction to engage two different gear trains is one that I have seen used in CEC high speed oscillograph recorders that we used at
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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              One method of changing direction to engage two different gear trains
              is one that I have seen used in CEC high speed oscillograph recorders that we
              used at Rockwell. CEC used "spring clutches" to allow drive in one direction
              only. A spring clutch uses a coiled spring wound about a rotating shaft. The
              spring is attached to a "floating" spur gear. When the shaft rotates in one
              direction, the spring tightens about the shaft and allows the drive
              rotational force to be transferred to the gear which can, in turn, drive
              something else.
              When the shaft rotates the other way, the spring loosens and no
              rotational movement is transferred to the gear. If two springs are used and
              each is wound the opposite way, one spring is tightened and the other is
              loosened, depending on the direction of rotation. Using a fairly "tough"
              spring and close tolerances, I have seen quite a bit of torque transferred in
              this way. It's kinda like a rotational version of the old Chinese finger
              "trap" novelty.
              You can find some of these clutches in old copy machines and similar
              places.
              Good Luck,
              Tom Carroll


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jack Buffington
              Two more methods to do this are to have two gears that spin freely on the input shaft. Connected to each gear is a sping that is wrapped aroung the input
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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                Two more methods to do this are to have two gears that spin freely on the
                input shaft. Connected to each gear is a sping that is wrapped aroung the
                input shaft. One gear has the spring wrapped clockwise, the other is
                counterclockwise. Rotating the input shaft will casue one of the springs
                to tighten around the shaft, and the other to loosen...

                There is also the option of having two ratcheting mechanisms connected to
                the same input shaft.

                -Jack

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              • Randy Carter
                Go get an old VCR. Take the top cover off and you will find what you are looking for right between the reel tables. The idler gear turns the take up side
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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                  Go get an old VCR. Take the top cover off and you will find what
                  you are looking for right between the reel tables. The idler
                  gear turns the take up side when the motor runs in the forward
                  direction and the supply side when the motor runs in reverse.
                  Some of the old old machines may use a rubber wheel but just
                  imagine that it was a gear like in all newer units.

                  > Fred Kerr (usa.net) wrote:
                  > I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm
                  curious if there
                  > are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns
                  in one
                  > direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other
                  direction, a different
                  > gear turns.
                  >
                  > Are there resources on the web with information about
                  mechanical problems and
                  > solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any
                  introductions to
                  > mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about
                  books! :)
                  >
                  >
                  > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Chris Vancil
                  ... if there ... one ... different ... problems and ... introductions to ... Useful books on mechanical design... Pictorial Handbook of Technical Devices, by
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 2, 2003
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                    --- In SeattleRobotics@yahoogroups.com, Fred Kerr (usa.net)
                    <fkerr@u...> wrote:
                    > I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm curious
                    if there
                    > are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in
                    one
                    > direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other direction, a
                    different
                    > gear turns.
                    >
                    > Are there resources on the web with information about mechanical
                    problems and
                    > solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any
                    introductions to
                    > mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)

                    Useful books on mechanical design...

                    "Pictorial Handbook of Technical Devices," by Pete Grafstein

                    "Five Hundred and Seven Mechanical Movements," Henry Brown

                    "Ingenious Mechanisms for Designers and Inventors" (4 volumes)

                    I ran into this page while searching on the web...

                    http://www.robotbooks.com/mechanics.htm

                    --Chris Vancil
                  • Tony Mactutis
                    I have found the the following book to be very helpful: Mechanical Devices for the Electronics Experimenter by C Britton Rorabaugh It s got lots of good stuff
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 3, 2003
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                      I have found the the following book to be very helpful:

                      Mechanical Devices for the Electronics Experimenter
                      by C Britton Rorabaugh

                      It's got lots of good stuff on all different kinds of motors and mechanical actuators.

                      -Tony

                      On Tue, 1 Apr 2003, Fred Kerr wrote:

                      > I'm a computer engineer not a mechanical engineer. :) I'm curious if there
                      > are standard ways to set up gears such that if the motor turns in one
                      > direction, one gear turns, and if it goes in the other direction, a different
                      > gear turns.
                      >
                      > Are there resources on the web with information about mechanical problems and
                      > solutions? Much like an intro to electronics, are there any introductions to
                      > mechanical design? Actually, for that matter, what about books! :)
                      >
                      >
                      > Visit the SRS Website at http://www.seattlerobotics.org
                      >
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > SeattleRobotics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                      >
                      >
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