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Re: Question from this morning's webcast

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  • Guy
    Hi Jim - I think you are right about Teragram and SAS. If you get chance to get to London give me a shout http://uk.linkedin.com/in/guyvalerio Guy
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 2, 2010
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      Hi Jim - I think you are right about Teragram and SAS. If you get chance to get to London give me a shout http://uk.linkedin.com/in/guyvalerio
      Guy
    • Lee Romero
      Jim and Guy - Thanks for your replies to my email. The topic I asked about was mostly tangential to the webinar - it happened to be on one of the slides and
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 6, 2010
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        Jim and Guy - Thanks for your replies to my email.

        The topic I asked about was mostly tangential to the webinar - it
        happened to be on one of the slides and this is a question I've long
        wondered about.

        I know "entity extraction" is a common buzzword for search engines and
        have never understood what any search engine actually does (other than
        use the buzzword, of course).

        Whatever they do, it seems like it would be most useful if you could
        (as an administrator of the search) somehow access the entities that
        are extracted and also depend on their "stability".

        Is there any writing anywhere you could point me to about what any
        particular (search) vendors are doing in this area? If FAST is
        looking at it, is there any description of what they're doing?

        Thanks again!
        Lee

        On Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 9:12 AM, Guy <guy.valerio@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Lee,
        >
        > Shame I missed the webinar, sounds like interesting subject matter and I think this was with Nate, yes? If so, all the better.
        >
        > As Jim points out capabilities vary between vendors offering entity extraction. Many users of this software choose to separate the annotation of content (using e.g. Nstein, Attensity, Opencalais, Tika) from the indexing and searching of it. FAST, like other search engines, makes use of that markup whether it was generated by them or by those other services and thus enables it all to be queryable.
        >
        > Choosing to separate out these functions is effort and cost but does enable the management of the entities in the way you describe to link them. That said, there are numerous smart people at FAST who have certainly looked at this in detail :-)
        >
        > BTW I believe it was Reuters (Thomson Reuters) who snapped up Clearforest whereas SAP acquired Inxight.
        >
        > Lee, follow @sethgrimes for comprehensive analysis of text analytics.
        >
        > Best,
        > Guy
        >
        >
      • Matt Moore
        Hi, It should be noted that entity extraction is not only used to improve search. It allows the automatic linking of content in one resource to another - e.g.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 7, 2010
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          Hi,

          It should be noted that entity extraction is not only used to improve search. It allows the automatic linking of content in one resource to another - e.g. if a text string in a document is identified as a company, it can be linked to a entry in something like hoovers or dun & bradstreet - there's a little about this in an article I wrote
          called "cyborg metadata" (I do not have link but it's easy to find on google). It's yer se-man-tik web innit? 

          Matt Moore

          On Jul 6, 2010, at 6:33 PM, Lee Romero <pekadad@...> wrote:

           

          Jim and Guy - Thanks for your replies to my email.

          The topic I asked about was mostly tangential to the webinar - it
          happened to be on one of the slides and this is a question I've long
          wondered about.

          I know "entity extraction" is a common buzzword for search engines and
          have never understood what any search engine actually does (other than
          use the buzzword, of course).

          Whatever they do, it seems like it would be most useful if you could
          (as an administrator of the search) somehow access the entities that
          are extracted and also depend on their "stability".

          Is there any writing anywhere you could point me to about what any
          particular (search) vendors are doing in this area? If FAST is
          looking at it, is there any description of what they're doing?

          Thanks again!
          Lee

          On Wed, Jun 30, 2010 at 9:12 AM, Guy <guy.valerio@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Lee,
          >
          > Shame I missed the webinar, sounds like interesting subject matter and I think this was with Nate, yes? If so, all the better.
          >
          > As Jim points out capabilities vary between vendors offering entity extraction. Many users of this software choose to separate the annotation of content (using e.g. Nstein, Attensity, Opencalais, Tika) from the indexing and searching of it. FAST, like other search engines, makes use of that markup whether it was generated by them or by those other services and thus enables it all to be queryable.
          >
          > Choosing to separate out these functions is effort and cost but does enable the management of the entities in the way you describe to link them. That said, there are numerous smart people at FAST who have certainly looked at this in detail :-)
          >
          > BTW I believe it was Reuters (Thomson Reuters) who snapped up Clearforest whereas SAP acquired Inxight.
          >
          > Lee, follow @sethgrimes for comprehensive analysis of text analytics.
          >
          > Best,
          > Guy
          >
          >


           
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