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Sean Fergus Lamont

15 January 1981
Perth, Scotland

6'2" (188cm), 224 lbs. (101.6kg)
Nicknames: Piece, Legend, Monty, Schlong (Lamont), Schlongmont (Brothers)


His explosive, powerful running and general size are his biggest assets; put into words, "He is a tank".








2000 Lamont joined Rotherham and by 2001 was the club’s first under-21 captain.


2002 Commonwealth Games he represented Scotland at sevens.


2003 he switched to Glasgow Rugby, where he had a very successful first season and quickly became a fan favorite at Hughenden.


2004 Lamont earned his first cap for Scotland, against Manu Samoa, on their tour. On his Murrayfield debut he scored a try against the Australians.


2005 He was named man of the match, for his performance during the Scotland/Italy Six Nations Championship match. Left the Glasgow Warriors to join the Northampton Saints.


2006 Sean helped get a historic victory over the French, with two tries. He also played a major part in the Scotland's victory over England, during the Calcutta Cup tournament.


2007 Lamont wins the Famous Grouse Scotland Player of the Season award, making him the first exclusive winger recipient. Anterior Cruciate Ligament tear ends season early.


2009 Tours French teams, inc. Brive, but ends up, in Wales, with the Llanelli Scarlets.

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Sean's audience increased after the 2007 Dieux du Stade (Gods of the Stadium) calendar and DVD, in-which he showed his ample full frontal nudity; making Sean the newest "Sp0rn" star. He has said that he is interested in posing again.

Group Information

  • 4133
  • Rugby Union
  • Dec 20, 2006
  • English

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