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Re: youth scouting/radio web pages

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  • Jean
    Thanks for all the good suggestions....from all of you. Just keep sending them to me. I don t know how long it will take for the youth page to become a
    Message 1 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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      Thanks for all the good suggestions....from all of you. Just keep
      sending them to me. I don't know how long it will take for the youth
      page to become a reality, but I know I'm are working on the "ground
      work." I appreciate all the good ideas! Thanks!

      --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "kr1zan" <kr1zan@a...> wrote:
      > --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
      > > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
      > people
      > > pertaining to ham radio. This would be people who are not hams
      and
      > > just "surfing" around on the web and maybe looking for something
      to
      > > tell (or show) just why they should be interested in ham radio.
      > >
      > <<<<< Rest of Message Snipped Out >>>>>
      > > Any ideas?
      > >
      > > Jean
      >
      > 1) How about some hidden words puzzles? These can be created for
      > different age groups. You know: the ones with words forwards,
      > backwards, at diagonoals. Could include the words of the Phonetic
      > Alphabet. Others could be Ham buzz-words.
      >
      > 2) A good on-line self study for the Radio Merit Badge. Text and
      > fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc. There are a couple of
      > sites, including a link off the ARRL page, for some studies. The
      > site should include various forms to facilitate drawings.
      > Instructions on how to find a Radio MB counselor.
      >
      > 3) How about some map games? If you are at VK7 and hear a station
      > with a bearing of xxx degrees and Bob is in 4S7 and hears the
      staton
      > with a bearing of xxx degrees, where is the unknown station?
      >
      > A station you talk with is at lat xx deg xx min, lon xx deg xx
      min.
      > What prefix(es) might the station have? Or, what country is this?
      >
      > You live in Dallas, TX and want to talk with Australia. In what
      > direction would you point your beam?
      >
      > 4) How about an Internet search challenge? Some URLs are suggested
      > or keywords are mentioned for use with search engines. Some
      > questions need answers from the located web sites. Get the correct
      > answers and you are eligible to purchase a Ham Radio Savvy patch
      (or
      > pin) from 1) the ARRL, 2) some other sponsoring group
      >
      > 5) How about some coloring pages that can be printed or used with
      > Microsoft Paint? These could be old JOTA patches, cute Scouting or
      > youth drawings, etc. emphasizing some aspect of Ham Radio.
      >
      > 6) I like Bob Bruninga's suggestion of Morse Code. Maybe use
      > HamScope software, a PC, microphone and a CPO for a demo.
      > Scouts/participants try sending Morse Code for spell their name.
      > Give them an award when they do -- a circular adhesive patch/name
      tag
      > with something like "ASK ME ABOUT CW", or "CW OP"
      >
      > 7) Cross word puzzles are always good.
      >
      > 8) Good ideas for Science Fair projects. Everyone likes going to a
      > web page and getting solutions. Could even be a place for others
      to
      > post their science fair projects (photo, description, parts list,
      > etc.)
      >
      > 9) A challenge to tune in a listen to AM clear channel broadcast
      > stations. Provide a call sign, frequency, program content, city,
      > state list and instructions on how to listen, when to listen, how
      to
      > log, how to send for QSL cards, etc.
      >
      > 10) Info on basics of scanners: equipment, frequencies, books, web
      > sites, clubs, etc.
      >
      > I'm sure I'll think of more as others comment and I have more time.
      >
      > Good idea Jean.
      >
      > 73, Frank KR1ZAN
      > Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
      > Richardson, TX
    • kr1zan
      ... people ... the ... A game we ve had fun with teaches the basics of operating on a radio, the concept of a net control, teamwork, map reading and paying
      Message 2 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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        --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
        > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
        people
        > pertaining to ham radio.

        <<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>

        > Also, I am looking to make a list of ham/scout activities. This
        > would be something like would be set up for a camporee as one of
        the
        > events.

        <<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>

        >Any ideas?
        >
        > Jean


        A game we've had fun with teaches the basics of operating on a radio,
        the concept of a net control, teamwork, map reading and paying
        attention to what's going on during a net.

        Each participant (or team) is provided with a radio (FRS or amateur
        radio; one member of the team must be licensed or a licensed Advisor
        is provided). Each participant (or team) is given an identical map
        (a world map, or state map, or city map, or map of the camp).

        Participants are briefed on call signs, how to call someone, IDing,
        what a "net" is, what a Net Control is, very basic net procedures,
        operating courtesies, etc.

        One station, starts with an Advisor and later is the winner of a
        previous game, is the Fox. The scenario states that the Fox's
        transmitter has been damaged before he/she could tell us where he/she
        is located. BUT, one button on the DTMF pad still works and the Fox
        can send some simple characters in Morse Code. The Fox knows N for
        NO, Y for YES, and ? for I DON'T UNDERSTAND YOUR QUESTION.

        Participants are told they may ask questions according to basic rules
        (either in turn or by calling NCS). The NCS allows them to call the
        Fox and ask a question which can be answered by N or Y. Each station
        gets only one chance during a "round" to ask a question. If the
        question can't be answered by yes or no, the Fox sends ?

        Examples: The Fox is in New Zealand
        1) Are you North of the Equator? N
        2) Are you in South America? N
        3) Are you in Africa? N
        4) Are you in Australia? N
        5) Are you in the Atlantic Ocean? N
        6) Are you in the Pacific Ocean? Y
        7) Are you in New Zealand? Y *** WINNER ***

        Of course, the youth will get very creative with questions about
        latitude and longitude. The Fox will often choose some exotic island
        or small town (if using a state map) or some short street on a city
        map.

        A variation of this is to hide the Fox on the campsite and give
        answers as above, but the hunters are on foot and ask questions about
        location on the camp, information relative to the Fox's unknown site
        (i.e., can you see outside?, can you see the dining room?, are you
        near a lake or body of water?). The story about the Fox can be
        embellished with something like a small plane has crashed on the
        camp. The pilot is injured but has a radio. The microphone is
        busted but a tone button still works. The pilot can hear people
        calling but can only send Y or N or ? (unfortunately he only
        completed course #1 of the Morse Code Course !!).

        Obviously, as the hunters get close to the Fox, they can also use
        some basic RDF concepts to home in on the Fox. Once found, the
        victors become the next Fox.

        73, Frank KR1ZAN
        Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
        Richardson, TX
      • kr1zan
        ... people ... Jean, Comment on the Youth Sked s Database: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/ead/youthskeds/ I like the Youth Sked s Database, but, I d like to see it
        Message 3 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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          --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
          > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
          people
          > pertaining to ham radio.

          <<<<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>>

          >Any ideas?
          >
          > Jean

          Jean,

          Comment on the Youth Sked's Database:
          http://www.arrl.org/FandES/ead/youthskeds/

          I like the Youth Sked's Database, but, I'd like to see it expanded:
          1) Add an entry for a URL (especially useful for clubs)
          2) Add a "box" for listing comments about special event, URL, times,
          frequencies, type of activity, special interests.
          3) Expand the search options to search for keywords in the "box"
          4) Notify the posting group via their listed email address about 30
          days prior to expiration that their entry is about to expire. This
          might be an optional button for those postings which are time
          sensitive and for which the poster wants them to die naturally (i.e.,
          JOTA)
          5) Add a button for KID'S DAY. Of course, item 2 (comments box)
          might greatly simplify the proliferation of buttons. For example,
          groups going hiking during JOTT (Jamboree on The Trail), Scouts
          operating Field Day, or Straight Key Night, Guides On The Air (GOTA),
          etc.

          The Search feature would also overcome the problem some of us have
          now if a Scout group (i.e., Cub Scouts or Venturing/Exploring) posts
          in "Other Youth Group" rather than "Boy Scouts".

          73, Frank KR1ZAN
          Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
          Richardson, TX
        • Dan Fisher
          Bob, That s a neat idea, it s cheap and easy, and no license needed!!! Dan KG4SDJ
          Message 4 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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            Bob,

            That's a neat idea, it's cheap and easy, and no license needed!!!

            Dan KG4SDJ

            Bob Bruninga wrote:

            > I took one of the small single channel FRS radios and put it in a tin-can
            > with a tin lid and rubber band around the PTT. Range was about 100
            > yards....
            >
          • AsABat
            ... Interesting... I ve been wondering if it might be possible to offer merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting others to do the
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 23, 2003
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              > 2) A good on-line self study for the Radio Merit Badge. Text and
              > fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc. There are a couple of
              > sites, including a link off the ARRL page, for some studies. The
              > site should include various forms to facilitate drawings.
              > Instructions on how to find a Radio MB counselor.

              Interesting... I've been wondering if it might be possible to offer
              merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting
              others to do the work for them? Of course, they'd still have to have
              the QSO and visit a ham shack.

              I have given some Scouts partials at Scout Fair, then mail the last
              requirement to me for sign off. I also talked with one young ham on
              the air to complete some requirements. That was a unique way to earn
              a merit badge!

              Bill Jeffrey AA6J
              www.qsl.net/aa6j/radiomb
              Radio Merit Badge Notes
            • Scott Sarah
              ... proving it was done by a registered Radio Merit badge councelor, having the partial/merit badge card, and the signature, and as your said not knowing if
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 23, 2003
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                AsABat wrote:

                >
                >
                > Interesting... I've been wondering if it might be possible to offer
                > merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting
                > others to do the work for them? Of course, they'd still have to have
                > the QSO and visit a ham shack.

                proving it was done by a registered Radio Merit badge councelor, having
                the partial/merit badge card, and the signature, and as your said not
                knowing if hey did it or their parents did it.

                Scott (Advancement Comittee member of BSA Troop 273 in Stow Ohio)
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