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Re: [Scoutradio] youth scouting/radio web pages

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  • Bob Bruninga
    ... TWO ideas: 1) Well, there are several LIVE APRS pages that would be nice. The best page would be for them to select their STATE and then be given a LIVE
    Message 1 of 15 , May 19, 2003
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      On Mon, 19 May 2003, Jean wrote:

      > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young people
      > pertaining to ham radio.

      TWO ideas:

      1) Well, there are several LIVE APRS pages that would be nice. The best
      page would be for them to select their STATE and then be given a LIVE
      display of mobiles and stations on the map. They can try to see who is
      the closest station or mobile to their school. I will see if I can find
      a volunteer to set up these pages.

      2) A MORSE CODE QSO ROOM. Dont laugh. I have presented HAM radio to
      elementary and middle schools and the ONE thing that always gets their
      interest is CW, yes, CW. They love the idea of a secret code. I do not
      do HF, I am not a CW enthusiast, but I say again, it is the most
      significant thing that grabs the attention of that age kid (today,
      because hey've seen everything else already)...

      1) One screen would let them TYPE in letters and HEAR CW locally.
      (this lets them practice sending)
      2) Another one sends them some CW and lets them try to hit the right
      letter. and scores them.
      3) READ-THE-MAIL - This lets them "tune in" to a QSO in progress by
      selecting from any of the QSO's in progress, but they cannot
      transmit. (though they can send a signal that alerts the other
      members on that channel that someone wants to join them).
      4) CALLING CHANNEL - Here is where they can send a CQ and or listen
      for others calling CQ.

      Notice that it is imperative that they have an ID. This would be a
      callsign generated as WEB#XYZ where XYZ are their initials that match
      their loggon to the site and # is the best guess of their callsign region.

      Later on someone could write a PSK-31 emulator web page AND/OR
      the full audio CW web page that I proposed a few years ago:

      I can't find where I posted it, but it LOOKS just like an HF radio. AND
      you tune around and you HEAR CW audio QSO's and the tones move just like a
      real radio. You can tune up and down... and y ou can hear simultaneous
      QSO's. Its all generated in your sound card from a stream of QSO's that
      are piped together kind of like the worldwide APRS intenet system...


      de WB4APR, Bob
    • davifish@bellsouth.net
      Jean, I don t know if my 1st message went through. I m doing this from work, and they use filtering software that allows me to do personal e-mail in 10-minute
      Message 2 of 15 , May 19, 2003
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        ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young people
        pertaining to ham radio.  This would be people who are not hams and
        just "surfing" around on the web and maybe looking for something to
        tell (or show) just why they should be interested in ham radio.

        At this point I am taking any ideas from coloring pages and games to
        fill in the blank or crossword puzzles.  The major thing is to appeal
        to young people.

        When we say young people, I mean ranging from early grade school to
        high school.  I am taking any suggestions at this point, but I
        realize eventually we will have to break down the pages into age
        categories.  (If you have something you want to send me in the mail,
        feel free.  I will be glad to give you my address.

        Also, I am looking to make a list of ham/scout activities.  This
        would be something like would be set up for a camporee as one of the
        events.  I'm not sure how to explain it but it would be something
        like a competition, or timed event.  But remember the scouts would
        only be there for maybe 15 minutes.  I don't see how actually talking
        on the radio could be one because the scouts may come in groups so it
        should be something they can all work on together to get to one
        goal.  For instance.....putting the antenna up.  Any ideas? 

        Jean



        Check out the UK Radio-Scouting page here at Yahoo!Groups. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/radio-scouting-uk

        Now that you've got new licensees in your unit, why not have them subscibe to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ScoutRadioYouth

        Visit "Operation On Target BSA" Mountain Top Signaling:
        http://www.ontargetbsa.org/

        Great list of Scouting/Amateur Radio web sites:
        http://www.k1dwu.net/ham-links/clubs.-.scouting.phtml

        Visit the "Adventure Radio Society" http://www.natworld.com/ars/

        ScoutRadio start page:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scoutradio (Email archives - member email addresses - change your subscription details, etc.)

        Post message: scoutradio@yahoogroups.com
        Unsubscribe:  scoutradio-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        List owner:   scoutradio-owner@yahoogroups.com

        SCOUTING and AMATEUR RADIO - FUN FOR ALL AGES


        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • kr1zan
        ... people ... 1) How about some hidden words puzzles? These can be created for different age groups. You know: the ones with words forwards, backwards, at
        Message 3 of 15 , May 19, 2003
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          --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
          > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
          people
          > pertaining to ham radio. This would be people who are not hams and
          > just "surfing" around on the web and maybe looking for something to
          > tell (or show) just why they should be interested in ham radio.
          >
          <<<<< Rest of Message Snipped Out >>>>>
          > Any ideas?
          >
          > Jean

          1) How about some hidden words puzzles? These can be created for
          different age groups. You know: the ones with words forwards,
          backwards, at diagonoals. Could include the words of the Phonetic
          Alphabet. Others could be Ham buzz-words.

          2) A good on-line self study for the Radio Merit Badge. Text and
          fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc. There are a couple of
          sites, including a link off the ARRL page, for some studies. The
          site should include various forms to facilitate drawings.
          Instructions on how to find a Radio MB counselor.

          3) How about some map games? If you are at VK7 and hear a station
          with a bearing of xxx degrees and Bob is in 4S7 and hears the staton
          with a bearing of xxx degrees, where is the unknown station?

          A station you talk with is at lat xx deg xx min, lon xx deg xx min.
          What prefix(es) might the station have? Or, what country is this?

          You live in Dallas, TX and want to talk with Australia. In what
          direction would you point your beam?

          4) How about an Internet search challenge? Some URLs are suggested
          or keywords are mentioned for use with search engines. Some
          questions need answers from the located web sites. Get the correct
          answers and you are eligible to purchase a Ham Radio Savvy patch (or
          pin) from 1) the ARRL, 2) some other sponsoring group

          5) How about some coloring pages that can be printed or used with
          Microsoft Paint? These could be old JOTA patches, cute Scouting or
          youth drawings, etc. emphasizing some aspect of Ham Radio.

          6) I like Bob Bruninga's suggestion of Morse Code. Maybe use
          HamScope software, a PC, microphone and a CPO for a demo.
          Scouts/participants try sending Morse Code for spell their name.
          Give them an award when they do -- a circular adhesive patch/name tag
          with something like "ASK ME ABOUT CW", or "CW OP"

          7) Cross word puzzles are always good.

          8) Good ideas for Science Fair projects. Everyone likes going to a
          web page and getting solutions. Could even be a place for others to
          post their science fair projects (photo, description, parts list,
          etc.)

          9) A challenge to tune in a listen to AM clear channel broadcast
          stations. Provide a call sign, frequency, program content, city,
          state list and instructions on how to listen, when to listen, how to
          log, how to send for QSL cards, etc.

          10) Info on basics of scanners: equipment, frequencies, books, web
          sites, clubs, etc.

          I'm sure I'll think of more as others comment and I have more time.

          Good idea Jean.

          73, Frank KR1ZAN
          Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
          Richardson, TX
        • Dan Fisher
          At our Spring District Camporee, we did an Emergency Preparedness program that involved Amateur Radio.One of the things we did was a rabbit hunt with some DF
          Message 4 of 15 , May 19, 2003
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            At our Spring District Camporee, we did an Emergency Preparedness
            program that involved Amateur Radio.One of the things we did was a
            "rabbit hunt" with some DF equipment provided by one of the members of
            our club. That was a big hit with the boys who were involved with it.

            Dan KG4SDJ
          • Bob Bruninga
            ... I took one of the small single channel FRS radios and put it in a tin-can with a tin lid and rubber band around the PTT. Range was about 100 yards. Then
            Message 5 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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              On Mon, 19 May 2003, Dan Fisher wrote:

              > At our Spring District Camporee, .... we did ... a "rabbit hunt" with
              > some DF equipment provided by one of the members of our club. That was a
              > big hit with the boys who were involved with it.

              I took one of the small single channel FRS radios and put it in a tin-can
              with a tin lid and rubber band around the PTT. Range was about 100 yards.

              Then handed out FRS radios to a bunch of kids and said go find it.
              Be sure to lecture them on the Body Blockage way to DF and give a
              talk about SQUELCHES, and noise and FM quieting and the MON button..

              To make the tin can RF proof, I actually took two tin can (dog food) and
              cut 1 inch kerfs in the second one so that it could be forced down over
              the first one. This not only provides an RF colsure, but also makes the
              cans long enough to hold the HT and its fixed antenna.

              de WB4APR, Bob
              .
            • kr1zan
              ... people ... to ... Jean, Another idea: How about the Archie Comic Book on line ? Since it s not being published anymore (?), why not make it available in
              Message 6 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
                > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
                people
                > pertaining to ham radio. This would be people who are not hams and
                > just "surfing" around on the web and maybe looking for something to
                > tell (or show) just why they should be interested in ham radio.
                >
                > At this point I am taking any ideas from coloring pages and games
                to
                > For instance.....putting the antenna up. Any ideas?
                > <<<<<<< Rest of message snipped out >>>>>>
                > Jean

                Jean,

                Another idea: How about the Archie Comic Book "on line"? Since it's
                not being published anymore (?), why not make it available in a
                convenient JPEG format in chapters for anyone to view?

                And, either at the end or as an optional chapter, invite viewers to
                become members of the on-line Archie Amateur Radio Club. They might
                then get a monthly, short newsletter from Archie telling a little
                about Ham Radio, fun things to do with Ham Radio, some interesting
                web sites, a game or two, maybe even localize it to announce local
                clubs, maybe call it "Archie's RadioGram". The RadioGram should have
                a convenient "button" to allow anyone receiving it to "opt out" of
                receiving it.

                OR, publish the RadioGram on line and invite viewers to bookmark the
                site and return often. The RadioGram should be at the elementary
                school level, shouldn't focus on technical stuff, kinda be like the
                Weekly Reader. Invite contributions from readers. It could have
                feature stories like ISS Crew Talks Over Ham Radio, Ham Radio to the
                Rescue, Ham Radio at the Boston Marathon. These kind of stories link
                to events that youth will be aware of and interested in. Even a
                story on DXpeditions, but from the curious side: photos of penguins,
                palm trees, lavish beaches, operators perched on a rock, climbing a
                palm tree, etc.

                The RadioGram should be written so a 6th grader could read it in less
                than 7 minutes. For older youth, parents and others who are
                interested, include some URLs for further reading and study.

                73, Frank KR1ZAN
                Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
                Richardson, TX
              • kr1zan
                ... people ... It s raining here in Dallas, so I guess I m relegated to thinking about the youth web site !! 1) Schematic symbol matching game. A schematic
                Message 7 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                  --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
                  > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
                  people
                  > pertaining to ham radio.
                  <<<<<<<< Rest of message snipped out >>>>>>>>>
                  > Any ideas?
                  >
                  > Jean

                  It's raining here in Dallas, so I guess I'm relegated to thinking
                  about the youth web site !!

                  1) Schematic symbol matching game. A schematic symbol or word is
                  shown along with 4 possible answers. The user selects an answer and
                  is told RIGHT or WRONG. Maybe make this similar to the "Receiving
                  Game" on Morse Academy. If WRONG, show the correct answer, then re-
                  ask the same question. At the end of a series of questions (number
                  of questions or period of time), display a score # Correct, #
                  Incorrect, Total Time for Game. It's a personal challenge to get
                  done quickly, and faster, each time the game is played.

                  2) How about a list, with pictures and a brief description, of all
                  the things we use in our lives that incorporate RADIO. i.e.,
                  television, cell phones, cordless phones, wireless internet
                  connections, garage door openers, satellites and satellite TV, CB,
                  FRS, wireless doorbells, AM and FM radio, radar, ship to shore
                  telephone, GPS, etc.

                  3) What time is it in? A simple discussion and game in which the
                  user is asked to predict what time (and what day) it is in various
                  countries. Possibly include a chart showing +/- for GMT, how to
                  calculate local time, maybe even a map. Along with the game, could
                  even include a table or map with real time clocks in various time
                  zones or countries.

                  4) How about a few real time audio links to some repeaters around the
                  country? Maybe an internet "scanner" which could provide audio, show
                  the call sign, city, frequency, etc. of the repeater being listened
                  to. OR, these could be some pre-recorded conversations.

                  5) How about some trading cards of famous people who are/were hams.
                  Photo, call sign, city, state, country, background info, small map of
                  world showing location of country. These would be printable images
                  that can be viewed on line, but also printed and traded, if users
                  wanted to.

                  That's it for now. Hope everyone is having a great day. I keep
                  hoping others will list some more ideas or comment on ones that have
                  been posted thus far.

                  73, Frank KR1ZAN
                  Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
                  Richardson, TX
                • Jean
                  Thanks for all the good suggestions....from all of you. Just keep sending them to me. I don t know how long it will take for the youth page to become a
                  Message 8 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                    Thanks for all the good suggestions....from all of you. Just keep
                    sending them to me. I don't know how long it will take for the youth
                    page to become a reality, but I know I'm are working on the "ground
                    work." I appreciate all the good ideas! Thanks!

                    --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "kr1zan" <kr1zan@a...> wrote:
                    > --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
                    > > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
                    > people
                    > > pertaining to ham radio. This would be people who are not hams
                    and
                    > > just "surfing" around on the web and maybe looking for something
                    to
                    > > tell (or show) just why they should be interested in ham radio.
                    > >
                    > <<<<< Rest of Message Snipped Out >>>>>
                    > > Any ideas?
                    > >
                    > > Jean
                    >
                    > 1) How about some hidden words puzzles? These can be created for
                    > different age groups. You know: the ones with words forwards,
                    > backwards, at diagonoals. Could include the words of the Phonetic
                    > Alphabet. Others could be Ham buzz-words.
                    >
                    > 2) A good on-line self study for the Radio Merit Badge. Text and
                    > fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc. There are a couple of
                    > sites, including a link off the ARRL page, for some studies. The
                    > site should include various forms to facilitate drawings.
                    > Instructions on how to find a Radio MB counselor.
                    >
                    > 3) How about some map games? If you are at VK7 and hear a station
                    > with a bearing of xxx degrees and Bob is in 4S7 and hears the
                    staton
                    > with a bearing of xxx degrees, where is the unknown station?
                    >
                    > A station you talk with is at lat xx deg xx min, lon xx deg xx
                    min.
                    > What prefix(es) might the station have? Or, what country is this?
                    >
                    > You live in Dallas, TX and want to talk with Australia. In what
                    > direction would you point your beam?
                    >
                    > 4) How about an Internet search challenge? Some URLs are suggested
                    > or keywords are mentioned for use with search engines. Some
                    > questions need answers from the located web sites. Get the correct
                    > answers and you are eligible to purchase a Ham Radio Savvy patch
                    (or
                    > pin) from 1) the ARRL, 2) some other sponsoring group
                    >
                    > 5) How about some coloring pages that can be printed or used with
                    > Microsoft Paint? These could be old JOTA patches, cute Scouting or
                    > youth drawings, etc. emphasizing some aspect of Ham Radio.
                    >
                    > 6) I like Bob Bruninga's suggestion of Morse Code. Maybe use
                    > HamScope software, a PC, microphone and a CPO for a demo.
                    > Scouts/participants try sending Morse Code for spell their name.
                    > Give them an award when they do -- a circular adhesive patch/name
                    tag
                    > with something like "ASK ME ABOUT CW", or "CW OP"
                    >
                    > 7) Cross word puzzles are always good.
                    >
                    > 8) Good ideas for Science Fair projects. Everyone likes going to a
                    > web page and getting solutions. Could even be a place for others
                    to
                    > post their science fair projects (photo, description, parts list,
                    > etc.)
                    >
                    > 9) A challenge to tune in a listen to AM clear channel broadcast
                    > stations. Provide a call sign, frequency, program content, city,
                    > state list and instructions on how to listen, when to listen, how
                    to
                    > log, how to send for QSL cards, etc.
                    >
                    > 10) Info on basics of scanners: equipment, frequencies, books, web
                    > sites, clubs, etc.
                    >
                    > I'm sure I'll think of more as others comment and I have more time.
                    >
                    > Good idea Jean.
                    >
                    > 73, Frank KR1ZAN
                    > Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
                    > Richardson, TX
                  • kr1zan
                    ... people ... the ... A game we ve had fun with teaches the basics of operating on a radio, the concept of a net control, teamwork, map reading and paying
                    Message 9 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                      --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
                      > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
                      people
                      > pertaining to ham radio.

                      <<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>

                      > Also, I am looking to make a list of ham/scout activities. This
                      > would be something like would be set up for a camporee as one of
                      the
                      > events.

                      <<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>

                      >Any ideas?
                      >
                      > Jean


                      A game we've had fun with teaches the basics of operating on a radio,
                      the concept of a net control, teamwork, map reading and paying
                      attention to what's going on during a net.

                      Each participant (or team) is provided with a radio (FRS or amateur
                      radio; one member of the team must be licensed or a licensed Advisor
                      is provided). Each participant (or team) is given an identical map
                      (a world map, or state map, or city map, or map of the camp).

                      Participants are briefed on call signs, how to call someone, IDing,
                      what a "net" is, what a Net Control is, very basic net procedures,
                      operating courtesies, etc.

                      One station, starts with an Advisor and later is the winner of a
                      previous game, is the Fox. The scenario states that the Fox's
                      transmitter has been damaged before he/she could tell us where he/she
                      is located. BUT, one button on the DTMF pad still works and the Fox
                      can send some simple characters in Morse Code. The Fox knows N for
                      NO, Y for YES, and ? for I DON'T UNDERSTAND YOUR QUESTION.

                      Participants are told they may ask questions according to basic rules
                      (either in turn or by calling NCS). The NCS allows them to call the
                      Fox and ask a question which can be answered by N or Y. Each station
                      gets only one chance during a "round" to ask a question. If the
                      question can't be answered by yes or no, the Fox sends ?

                      Examples: The Fox is in New Zealand
                      1) Are you North of the Equator? N
                      2) Are you in South America? N
                      3) Are you in Africa? N
                      4) Are you in Australia? N
                      5) Are you in the Atlantic Ocean? N
                      6) Are you in the Pacific Ocean? Y
                      7) Are you in New Zealand? Y *** WINNER ***

                      Of course, the youth will get very creative with questions about
                      latitude and longitude. The Fox will often choose some exotic island
                      or small town (if using a state map) or some short street on a city
                      map.

                      A variation of this is to hide the Fox on the campsite and give
                      answers as above, but the hunters are on foot and ask questions about
                      location on the camp, information relative to the Fox's unknown site
                      (i.e., can you see outside?, can you see the dining room?, are you
                      near a lake or body of water?). The story about the Fox can be
                      embellished with something like a small plane has crashed on the
                      camp. The pilot is injured but has a radio. The microphone is
                      busted but a tone button still works. The pilot can hear people
                      calling but can only send Y or N or ? (unfortunately he only
                      completed course #1 of the Morse Code Course !!).

                      Obviously, as the hunters get close to the Fox, they can also use
                      some basic RDF concepts to home in on the Fox. Once found, the
                      victors become the next Fox.

                      73, Frank KR1ZAN
                      Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
                      Richardson, TX
                    • kr1zan
                      ... people ... Jean, Comment on the Youth Sked s Database: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/ead/youthskeds/ I like the Youth Sked s Database, but, I d like to see it
                      Message 10 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                        --- In scoutradio@yahoogroups.com, "Jean" <jwolfgang@a...> wrote:
                        > ARRL is planning to create web pages that will appeal to young
                        people
                        > pertaining to ham radio.

                        <<<<<<<<< Snip ... Snip >>>>>>>>

                        >Any ideas?
                        >
                        > Jean

                        Jean,

                        Comment on the Youth Sked's Database:
                        http://www.arrl.org/FandES/ead/youthskeds/

                        I like the Youth Sked's Database, but, I'd like to see it expanded:
                        1) Add an entry for a URL (especially useful for clubs)
                        2) Add a "box" for listing comments about special event, URL, times,
                        frequencies, type of activity, special interests.
                        3) Expand the search options to search for keywords in the "box"
                        4) Notify the posting group via their listed email address about 30
                        days prior to expiration that their entry is about to expire. This
                        might be an optional button for those postings which are time
                        sensitive and for which the poster wants them to die naturally (i.e.,
                        JOTA)
                        5) Add a button for KID'S DAY. Of course, item 2 (comments box)
                        might greatly simplify the proliferation of buttons. For example,
                        groups going hiking during JOTT (Jamboree on The Trail), Scouts
                        operating Field Day, or Straight Key Night, Guides On The Air (GOTA),
                        etc.

                        The Search feature would also overcome the problem some of us have
                        now if a Scout group (i.e., Cub Scouts or Venturing/Exploring) posts
                        in "Other Youth Group" rather than "Boy Scouts".

                        73, Frank KR1ZAN
                        Advisor, Venturer Crew 73 - K5BSA
                        Richardson, TX
                      • Dan Fisher
                        Bob, That s a neat idea, it s cheap and easy, and no license needed!!! Dan KG4SDJ
                        Message 11 of 15 , May 20, 2003
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                          Bob,

                          That's a neat idea, it's cheap and easy, and no license needed!!!

                          Dan KG4SDJ

                          Bob Bruninga wrote:

                          > I took one of the small single channel FRS radios and put it in a tin-can
                          > with a tin lid and rubber band around the PTT. Range was about 100
                          > yards....
                          >
                        • AsABat
                          ... Interesting... I ve been wondering if it might be possible to offer merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting others to do the
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 23, 2003
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                            > 2) A good on-line self study for the Radio Merit Badge. Text and
                            > fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc. There are a couple of
                            > sites, including a link off the ARRL page, for some studies. The
                            > site should include various forms to facilitate drawings.
                            > Instructions on how to find a Radio MB counselor.

                            Interesting... I've been wondering if it might be possible to offer
                            merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting
                            others to do the work for them? Of course, they'd still have to have
                            the QSO and visit a ham shack.

                            I have given some Scouts partials at Scout Fair, then mail the last
                            requirement to me for sign off. I also talked with one young ham on
                            the air to complete some requirements. That was a unique way to earn
                            a merit badge!

                            Bill Jeffrey AA6J
                            www.qsl.net/aa6j/radiomb
                            Radio Merit Badge Notes
                          • Scott Sarah
                            ... proving it was done by a registered Radio Merit badge councelor, having the partial/merit badge card, and the signature, and as your said not knowing if
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 23, 2003
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                              AsABat wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              > Interesting... I've been wondering if it might be possible to offer
                              > merit badges electronically. What problems could there be? Getting
                              > others to do the work for them? Of course, they'd still have to have
                              > the QSO and visit a ham shack.

                              proving it was done by a registered Radio Merit badge councelor, having
                              the partial/merit badge card, and the signature, and as your said not
                              knowing if hey did it or their parents did it.

                              Scott (Advancement Comittee member of BSA Troop 273 in Stow Ohio)
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