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Re: [scoutradio] Digest Number 266

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  • Alan Stumpf
    Steve and Bob, I think that you both on the right track. Its easier to incorporate a fact sheet into local roundtables or even to council meetings than an
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 26, 2002
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      Steve and Bob,
      I think that you both on the right track. Its easier to incorporate a "fact
      sheet" into local roundtables or even to council meetings than an official
      appeal to national BSA. Bob why don't you post what you have right here and
      see if we can add anything, if you don't mind.

      73

      Alan Stumpf, KB3DHC
      Greater Pittsburgh Council
      Assistant Scoutmaster Troop 377
      JOTA Chairman NHARC
      kb3dhc@...


      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2002 08:35:48 EDT
      > From: W4SNW2@...
      > Subject: Scouting and FRS
      >
      > Hi all,
      >
      > I think the concept of a brief guide sheet for using FRS radios in the
      > context of Scouting is a good idea. We recently supported an ARES
      Marathon
      > event by using FRS radios in conjunction with Ham Radio in one segment of
      the
      > course with good results (and the boys received an ARRL Public Service
      > Commendation for their efforts over the very long day).
      >
      > I would suggest that someone draft such a document as an informal guide
      and
      > circulate it here for comment. Then it can be posted through the various
      > Scouter remailers in our councils and local areas (e.g., Rountable groups)
      > until everyone gets the word. It wouldn't take very long to spread around
      > most of the country through such an informal means. I would not be too
      > concerned about making the document BSA Official or including it in the
      Guide
      > to Safe Scouting as the use of FRS radios is not inherently dangerous and
      > they are being used anyway on such a wide scale.
      >
      > Likewise, we should not worry about the Radio Merit badge revisions as we
      > still want to promote Amateur Radio as the goal as it offers so much more
      > than FRS, CB or other options for the Scouts.
      >
      > Issues should include some basics about the limited range and power of
      such
      > radios; that no license is needed in FRS, but is needed on other radio
      > services such as Amateur Radio; basic radio technique such as the proposed
      > "tactical callsigns", talking in a normal voice to prevent distortion,
      > listening first, how to report an emergency, etc. Examples of how FRS
      radios
      > can be useful to a troop should also be mentioned (e.g., convoys,
      backpacker
      > to support vehicle link, public service events using a net control
      station,
      > campsite communications, etc.).
      >
      > Anyone like to give it a try. I am personally jammed for the next few
      weeks
      > with work responsibilities and would prefer to pass at this time if the
      goal
      > is to create something quickly.
      >
      > Best 73, YIS, etc. etc.
      >
      > Steve White, W4SNW
      > ARRL Volunteer Counsel and
      > Station Trustee, K4BOY
      > BSA Camp Flying Eagle,
      > Manatee County, Florida
      >
      >
      > [This message contained attachments]
      >
      >
      >
    • Bob Bruninga
      Here is a draft: SCOUT FRS RADIO GUIDELINES 28 Apr 2002 ... WB4APR The Family Radio Service is ideal for scout communications.
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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        Here is a draft:

        SCOUT FRS RADIO GUIDELINES 28 Apr 2002
        ------------------------------------------------------------------
        WB4APR

        The Family Radio Service is ideal for scout communications. Packs,
        troops, posts and camps should adopt FRS and encourage scouts to
        learn the fundamentals of radio technique for practical and
        efficient communications. FRS consists of 14 channels and 38
        squelch codes which combined, yield 532 ways NOT to communicate.
        To use FRS effectively and for safety in the wilderness, the
        following guidelines are recommended for all scouts.

        1) CHANNEL-1 TONE-0: At each new outing or venue, begin communi-
        cations on channel 1 tone 0 (or tones off). This is the uniiversal
        calling channel. If it is quiet, you may meet fellow hikers or
        scouters, and you are serving others by monitoring this channel
        for emergencies.

        2) SCOUTING CHANNEL: If channel 1 is too busy for peace of mind,
        change to channel 12, the scouting channel. Remember the 12 points
        of the scout law. If channel 12 is too busy, then set tone 5 for
        the 5 words in the scout motto. With this setting you will
        typically only hear other scouters in busy areas.

        3) CAMPOREE CHANNELS: At camporees or Jamborees, choose channels
        and tones that match your troop numbers where possible so that
        someone trying to reach you can guess at your channel and tone.
        Use the first two digits for your channel if possible. If above
        14, then use only the first digit. Use the next two digits for
        your tone. If above 38, then use only the single digit. Using
        these rules will make it possible to always find your frequency
        if someone needs to contact you.

        4) HAM CHANNEL: One other channel that may be interesting to
        scouts wanting to learn more about radio is channel 7 tone 3.
        That is where HAM radio operators on FRS may hang out if channel
        1 tone 0 is too busy for their peace-of-mind.

        5) CALLSIGNS: Communications always work best when everyone can
        tell who is talking. It is best to use callsigns and to begin
        any new conversation with standard radio technique of saying the
        callsign of the person you are calling followed by "this is"
        and your callsign. Choose good callsigns such as your troop
        number and your initials. For our Troop 995, for example,
        "995AJB this is 995REB, over"

        6) TEACH, NOT SCOLD: Never be critical of someone over the air.
        Teach proper radio technique by setting a good example and by
        instruction to new scouts. Remember with 38 squelch tones, the
        chance that the other person will hear you is less than 3%. If
        someone is trying to be malicious, the number one rule is to ignore
        him. If you respond, then you are doing exactly what he wants...
        If you ignore him, he will get bored and go elsewhere. Teaching
        familiarity with these techniques should be one of requirements
        at some level in every scouting program. Such as tenderfoot for
        Boy Scouts.

        7) NOT CALL BUTTONS: Do not use the CALLING buttons and tones except
        for special occasions. These tones are anoying, and inconsiderate.
        Use proper callsign technique instead.

        8) FRS NIGHT: Every WED nite at 9 PM everywhere is FRS night.
        This is a time to meet new radio friends who are also looking to see
        who else is radio active in their area and wants to learn more about
        radio. Just call "CQ FRS NIGHT, this is xxxxxxx, OVER".

        9) MOVE UP TO HAM RADIO: FRS radio is limited in range and power.
        If you enjoy radio and want to increase your range as well as make
        new radio friends and to even make phone calls from your radio, get
        in touch with HAM radio operators and learn all about the exciing
        world of HAM radio. They can communicate with lots more power and
        ranges that extend around the world. See www.arrl.org.

        10) PLAY IT SAFE: FRS radio is a great way to meet new friends and
        learn about radio. But it is unlicensed and you have no guarantee
        who may be on the other end. So be smart and use the same safety
        precautions as with any strangers. Do not reveal any private
        information and do not meet any stangers in any unsafe location.

        These guidelines for FRS and scouting are only a draft. They are not
        yet endorsed by any national scouting organization, but we hope to
        encourage their adoption. To keep up-to-date on any changes to this
        plan, vist our web page:

        http://www.ew.usna.edu/~bruninga/shacks4packs.html

        Enjoy radio, learn more, and move up to HAM radio!
        Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, Eagle Scout.
      • Mike Berryhill
        Bob: On behalf of everyone on this list, Thanks for taking the time to prepare these Guidelines. I did notice one mistake under 2) SCOUTING CHANNEL , ... the
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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          Bob:

          On behalf of everyone on this list, Thanks for taking the time
          to prepare these Guidelines.

          I did notice one mistake under "2) SCOUTING CHANNEL", "... the 5
          words in the scout motto". There are only 2 words in the Scout
          Motto, "Be Prepared". The Scout Slogan has 5 words, "Do a Good
          Turn Daily".


          Yours in Scouting,
          Mike Berryhill, KE6UZL

          --- Bob Bruninga <bruninga@...> wrote:
          > Here is a draft:
          >
          > SCOUT FRS RADIO GUIDELINES 28 Apr
          > 2002
          >
          ------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > WB4APR
          >
          > The Family Radio Service is ideal for scout communications.
          > Packs,
          > troops, posts and camps should adopt FRS and encourage scouts
          > to
          > learn the fundamentals of radio technique for practical and
          > efficient communications. FRS consists of 14 channels and 38
          > squelch codes which combined, yield 532 ways NOT to
          > communicate.
          > To use FRS effectively and for safety in the wilderness, the
          > following guidelines are recommended for all scouts.
          >
          > 1) CHANNEL-1 TONE-0: At each new outing or venue, begin
          > communi-
          > cations on channel 1 tone 0 (or tones off). This is the
          > uniiversal
          > calling channel. If it is quiet, you may meet fellow hikers
          > or
          > scouters, and you are serving others by monitoring this
          > channel
          > for emergencies.
          >
          > 2) SCOUTING CHANNEL: If channel 1 is too busy for peace of
          > mind,
          > change to channel 12, the scouting channel. Remember the 12
          > points
          > of the scout law. If channel 12 is too busy, then set tone 5
          > for
          > the 5 words in the scout motto. With this setting you will
          > typically only hear other scouters in busy areas.
          >
          > 3) CAMPOREE CHANNELS: At camporees or Jamborees, choose
          > channels
          > and tones that match your troop numbers where possible so
          > that
          > someone trying to reach you can guess at your channel and
          > tone.
          > Use the first two digits for your channel if possible. If
          > above
          > 14, then use only the first digit. Use the next two digits
          > for
          > your tone. If above 38, then use only the single digit.
          > Using
          > these rules will make it possible to always find your
          > frequency
          > if someone needs to contact you.
          >
          > 4) HAM CHANNEL: One other channel that may be interesting to
          > scouts wanting to learn more about radio is channel 7 tone 3.
          > That is where HAM radio operators on FRS may hang out if
          > channel
          > 1 tone 0 is too busy for their peace-of-mind.
          >
          > 5) CALLSIGNS: Communications always work best when everyone
          > can
          > tell who is talking. It is best to use callsigns and to begin
          > any new conversation with standard radio technique of saying
          > the
          > callsign of the person you are calling followed by "this is"
          > and your callsign. Choose good callsigns such as your troop
          > number and your initials. For our Troop 995, for example,
          > "995AJB this is 995REB, over"
          >
          > 6) TEACH, NOT SCOLD: Never be critical of someone over the
          > air.
          > Teach proper radio technique by setting a good example and by
          > instruction to new scouts. Remember with 38 squelch tones,
          > the
          > chance that the other person will hear you is less than 3%.
          > If
          > someone is trying to be malicious, the number one rule is to
          > ignore
          > him. If you respond, then you are doing exactly what he
          > wants...
          > If you ignore him, he will get bored and go elsewhere.
          > Teaching
          > familiarity with these techniques should be one of
          > requirements
          > at some level in every scouting program. Such as tenderfoot
          > for
          > Boy Scouts.
          >
          > 7) NOT CALL BUTTONS: Do not use the CALLING buttons and tones
          > except
          > for special occasions. These tones are anoying, and
          > inconsiderate.
          > Use proper callsign technique instead.
          >
          > 8) FRS NIGHT: Every WED nite at 9 PM everywhere is FRS night.
          > This is a time to meet new radio friends who are also looking
          > to see
          > who else is radio active in their area and wants to learn more
          > about
          > radio. Just call "CQ FRS NIGHT, this is xxxxxxx, OVER".
          >
          > 9) MOVE UP TO HAM RADIO: FRS radio is limited in range and
          > power.
          > If you enjoy radio and want to increase your range as well as
          > make
          > new radio friends and to even make phone calls from your
          > radio, get
          > in touch with HAM radio operators and learn all about the
          > exciing
          > world of HAM radio. They can communicate with lots more power
          > and
          > ranges that extend around the world. See www.arrl.org.
          >
          > 10) PLAY IT SAFE: FRS radio is a great way to meet new
          > friends and
          > learn about radio. But it is unlicensed and you have no
          > guarantee
          > who may be on the other end. So be smart and use the same
          > safety
          > precautions as with any strangers. Do not reveal any private
          > information and do not meet any stangers in any unsafe
          > location.
          >
          > These guidelines for FRS and scouting are only a draft. They
          > are not
          > yet endorsed by any national scouting organization, but we
          > hope to
          > encourage their adoption. To keep up-to-date on any changes
          > to this
          > plan, vist our web page:
          >
          > http://www.ew.usna.edu/~bruninga/shacks4packs.html
          >
          > Enjoy radio, learn more, and move up to HAM radio!
          > Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, Eagle Scout.
          >


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        • Dave Colter
          Just an editor s note - the word Scout should always be capitalized when refering to a member of the Scout movement, since it is a proper name. Otherwise,
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2002
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            Just an "editor's" note - the word "Scout" should always be capitalized when
            refering to a member of the Scout movement, since it is a proper name.
            Otherwise, this looks like an excellent start. I may use a version of this
            for our Scout reservation's two camps, where FRS activity is strong. Our
            camp offices assigns each troop a channel as they arrive at camp (yes, that
            many bring FRS radios!) and designate one channel for emergency calling,
            which is monitored by several staff members. I don't recall which channel
            they use. Tone use is discouraged, which is not a problem since we are far
            from "civilization". I will probably install FRS base stations in each camp
            office this year, along with SAME weather radios, right next to our
            commercial UHF repeater control stations. (The reservation has a 50w
            commercial repeater on a remote mountaintop (solar power), complete with
            emergency autopatch and a four user community tone panel to separate the two
            camp's staffs and the rangers. The fourth tone is used for the patch, which
            uses a special cell phone terminal. There are 25 portables and 5 mobiles in
            the system now, and as we scrounge more mobiles, we'll do the rest of the 20
            vehicle fleet! )
            73,
            Dave WA1ZCN
            Camp Committee
            Griswold Scout Reservation - Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

            > Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2002 08:55:06 -0400 (EDT)
            > From: Bob Bruninga <bruninga@...>
            > Subject: Scouts FRS Radio Guidelines
            >
            > Here is a draft:
            >
            > SCOUT FRS RADIO GUIDELINES 28 Apr 2002
          • Larry Acklin
            Excellent! My troop has embraced FRS on their own- we are using ch 7 tone 7 (troop # is 7!) on caravans and during camporees and outings. I will probably
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30, 2002
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              Excellent!
               
              My troop has embraced FRS on their own- we are using ch 7 tone 7 (troop # is 7!) on caravans and during camporees and outings.
               
              I will probably distribute this document with an addendum for our troop, if that is OK with Bob.
               
              73
              Larry KB3CUF
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, April 29, 2002 8:55 AM
              Subject: [scoutradio] Scouts FRS Radio Guidelines

              Here is a draft:

              SCOUT FRS RADIO GUIDELINES                             28 Apr 2002
              ------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                          WB4APR
            • Bob Bruninga
              On Mon, 29 Apr 2002, I posted a SCOUTING FRS RADIO CODE... If you are interested, I edited it some today to make a better uderstanding of what is different
              Message 6 of 6 , May 10, 2002
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                On Mon, 29 Apr 2002, I posted a SCOUTING FRS RADIO CODE...

                If you are interested, I edited it some today to make a better
                uderstanding of what is different about FRS and "radio". The new wording
                shows scouts how FRS was designed for consumers to be a CELL-PHONE
                clone for one-on-one comms. THus they have those silly RING tones and
                CALL buttons.

                But in a "radio net" on a shared channel with lots of people (like
                Scouting applications), these ring tones and CALL buttons actually
                INTERFERE with good communicatinos techinique..

                I posted the SOUTING FRS RADIO CODE on:

                http://www.ew.usna.edu/~bruninga/frsplan.txt

                de WB4APR, Bob
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