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Scouts Camping Electrical Lesson

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  • Bob Bruninga
    On my next camping trip, I will take along a bundle of wire and give each kid one or two small bulbs. I will have a central low voltage powersupply and let em
    Message 1 of 2 , May 24, 1999
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      On my next camping trip, I will take along a bundle of wire and give
      each kid one or two small bulbs. I will have a central low voltage
      powersupply and let em play. The objective is to string wire to their
      tent to keep their bulb lit. Lessons are splicing, power distribution,
      voltage drop, series and parallel connections. Sparks and so forth.

      12 volts woiuld be nice, but I just happened to stumble on a bunch of
      little bulbs and sockets that are 24 volts. A small 24 volt bell
      transformer serves as my supply. So far my source of wire is a 25 foot
      piece of 50 conductor phone wire used on old fashioned 5 button phones.

      With 25 pairs of multicolor #28? solid cnductor wire that is easy to pull
      out in pairs, and has so far served us for building Telegraph sets,
      phones, and XTAL radios and we still have lots of wire left. This one
      piece of wire supplies over 625 feet of wire pairs.

      My kids did it last night on a backyard campout and had a blast. The
      beauty of the small wire and limited supply transformer (1 amp) clearly
      demonstrates brownout as loading increases. Also short circuit current is
      limited and fail safe. ALso 24 volts does give enough of a tingle when
      you are wet to teach a little respect for it.

      I post this cautiously, because the point here is to teach them something
      useful and safely. This is not a recommendation for unsupervised use by
      idiots.

      de WB4APR, Bob

      It reminds me of my youth when we wired the whole neighborhood pieced
      together from bits of wire found in the phone company dumpster. No piece
      was longer than 10 feet, but our network extended probably over 1500 feet.
      It rarely worked well, but we did move from morse code with bulbs, through
      carbon mics to an amplified intercom system. THen we got the original 3
      transistor supperg\reggen Knight Kit walkie talkies and never used the
      wire again...
    • Don Van Horn
      Have a demonstration for my scout radio/elecricity class called the lemmon battery, and spit on a blotter. WEs copper wire, and different metals stuck in a
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 14, 1999
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        Have a demonstration for my scout radio/elecricity class called the lemmon
        battery, and spit on a blotter. WEs copper wire, and different metals stuck
        in a lemon, and diferent coins with a spit soaked blotter between them
        (silver & copper work very well, if you have the silver coins)

        Don K1FZY OM of KC6ETE David

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Bob Bruninga [SMTP:bruninga@...]
        > Sent: Monday, May 24, 1999 4:25 PM
        > To: Jon Pearl W4ABC
        > Cc: SCOUTRADIO@...; SCOUTRADIO@onelist.com; WCFLA Reflector; FLHAM
        > Reflector; CARS; Daniel W. Johnson; John Brook
        > Subject: [scoutradio] Scouts Camping Electrical Lesson
        >
        > From: Bob Bruninga <bruninga@...>
        >
        > On my next camping trip, I will take along a bundle of wire and give
        > each kid one or two small bulbs. I will have a central low voltage
        > powersupply and let em play. The objective is to string wire to their
        > tent to keep their bulb lit. Lessons are splicing, power distribution,
        > voltage drop, series and parallel connections. Sparks and so forth.
        >
        > 12 volts woiuld be nice, but I just happened to stumble on a bunch of
        > little bulbs and sockets that are 24 volts. A small 24 volt bell
        > transformer serves as my supply. So far my source of wire is a 25 foot
        > piece of 50 conductor phone wire used on old fashioned 5 button phones.
        >
        > With 25 pairs of multicolor #28? solid cnductor wire that is easy to pull
        > out in pairs, and has so far served us for building Telegraph sets,
        > phones, and XTAL radios and we still have lots of wire left. This one
        > piece of wire supplies over 625 feet of wire pairs.
        >
        > My kids did it last night on a backyard campout and had a blast. The
        > beauty of the small wire and limited supply transformer (1 amp) clearly
        > demonstrates brownout as loading increases. Also short circuit current is
        > limited and fail safe. ALso 24 volts does give enough of a tingle when
        > you are wet to teach a little respect for it.
        >
        > I post this cautiously, because the point here is to teach them something
        > useful and safely. This is not a recommendation for unsupervised use by
        > idiots.
        >
        > de WB4APR, Bob
        >
        > It reminds me of my youth when we wired the whole neighborhood pieced
        > together from bits of wire found in the phone company dumpster. No piece
        > was longer than 10 feet, but our network extended probably over 1500 feet.
        > It rarely worked well, but we did move from morse code with bulbs, through
        > carbon mics to an amplified intercom system. THen we got the original 3
        > transistor supperg\reggen Knight Kit walkie talkies and never used the
        > wire again...
        >
        >
        >
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