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Re: [ScoutRadio] Radio Scouting flag

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  • Bill Stewart, w2bsa - Verizon
    Well that stops it for me since I will NOT do business with PAYPAL. Sorry, Bill, W2BSA
    Message 1 of 19 , May 21, 2009
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      Well that stops it for me since I will NOT do business with PAYPAL.

      Sorry,

      Bill, W2BSA

      jamboree2007 wrote:

      Hi Bill,

      If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).

      I will then send you an email through paypal "request for money". You will pay for flag price + shipping charge which is total US$70.

      And you will receive the flag within 1 to 1.5 weeks.

      Because this is customize print, you may include your call sign as well and no additional charge. In fact, you are allowed to print for other design as well.

      Henry Tan


    • David Hutchinson
      Hi Bill I told Henry exactly the same - I will not do business through Paypal either. I have been spammed too many times by them. 73 David Hutchinson GI4FUM
      Message 2 of 19 , May 21, 2009
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        Hi Bill

        I told Henry exactly the same - I will not do business through Paypal either. I have been spammed too many times by them.

        73
        David Hutchinson GI4FUM

        --- In ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Stewart, w2bsa - Verizon" <w2bsa@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well that stops it for me since I will NOT do business with PAYPAL.
        >
        > Sorry,
        >
        > Bill, W2BSA
        >
        > jamboree2007 wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi Bill,
        > >
        > > If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your
        > > contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your
        > > require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).
        > >
        > > I will then send you an email through paypal "request for money". You
        > > will pay for flag price + shipping charge which is total US$70.
        > >
        > > And you will receive the flag within 1 to 1.5 weeks.
        > >
        > > Because this is customize print, you may include your call sign as
        > > well and no additional charge. In fact, you are allowed to print for
        > > other design as well.
        > >
        > > Henry Tan
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Bill Stewart, w2bsa - Verizon
        Yeah, they are un-regulated so they sometimes pull some things with accounts that are not exactly kosher. I wish they were forced to operate as a bank because
        Message 3 of 19 , May 21, 2009
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          Yeah, they are un-regulated so they sometimes pull some things with
          accounts that are not exactly kosher.
          I wish they were forced to operate as a bank because they would then be
          under the scrutiny of the US state
          and federal banking authorities.

          73,

          Bill Stewart, W2BSA

          David Hutchinson wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi Bill
          >
          > I told Henry exactly the same - I will not do business through Paypal
          > either. I have been spammed too many times by them.
          >
          > 73
          > David Hutchinson GI4FUM
          >
          > --- In ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:ScoutRadio%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bill Stewart, w2bsa - Verizon"
          > <w2bsa@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Well that stops it for me since I will NOT do business with PAYPAL.
          > >
          > > Sorry,
          > >
          > > Bill, W2BSA
          > >
          > > jamboree2007 wrote:
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Hi Bill,
          > > >
          > > > If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your
          > > > contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your
          > > > require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).
          > > >
          > > > I will then send you an email through paypal "request for money". You
          > > > will pay for flag price + shipping charge which is total US$70.
          > > >
          > > > And you will receive the flag within 1 to 1.5 weeks.
          > > >
          > > > Because this is customize print, you may include your call sign as
          > > > well and no additional charge. In fact, you are allowed to print for
          > > > other design as well.
          > > >
          > > > Henry Tan
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
          >
        • Phil Sohn
          Henry, do you have a hi-res image you are using for creating the flag? Would you mind sharing it? I ve only seen fairly low res images of this. Phil Sohn K7APS
          Message 4 of 19 , May 21, 2009
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            Henry, do you have a hi-res image you are using for creating the flag? Would you mind sharing it? I've only seen fairly low res images of this.
             
            Phil Sohn
            K7APS

            Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2009 8:02 PM
            Subject: [ScoutRadio] Radio Scouting flag

            I am currently helping the UK radio scouting group to produce the radio scouting flag as you can see here in the link.

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/ScoutRadio /photos/album/ 1662004746/ pic/1493012164/ view?picmode= &mode=tn& order=ordinal& start=1&count= 20&dir=asc

            The unit price is US$50 for one piece, digital printed to silky woven polyester material both front and back. The shipping charge to USA is about US$20 using FedEx

            The size is set at 6 ft x 3 ft and the delivery will complete within 1 ~ 1.5 weeks.

            Henry Tan

          • Gary Wilson
            ... Henry: I have no problem paying you through PayPal, which I use a dozen times each week without any problem, but I can t order the flag without knowing
            Message 5 of 19 , May 21, 2009
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              > If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).


              Henry:

              I have no problem paying you through PayPal, which I use a dozen times each week without any problem, but I can't order the flag without knowing your e-mail address. ;-)

              Please send your email address to the Yahoo Group in a creative manner that looks like text to avoid it's being filtered out by Yahoo. For example, ABC at xyz dot org .

              We could have used one at the Dayton Hamvention last weekend.

              Thanks & 73

              Gary Wilson, K2GW
            • jamboree2007
              Gary, Please send me your telephone number privately. FedEx would require your contact number in the shipping document to send the flag. regards Henry ...
              Message 6 of 19 , May 22, 2009
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                Gary,

                Please send me your telephone number privately. FedEx would require your contact number in the shipping document to send the flag.

                regards
                Henry

                --- On Thu, 5/21/09, Gary Wilson <k2gw@...> wrote:

                From: Gary Wilson <k2gw@...>
                Subject: [ScoutRadio] Re: Radio Scouting flag
                To: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, May 21, 2009, 2:46 PM

                > If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).

                Henry:

                I have no problem paying you through PayPal, which I use a dozen times each week without any problem, but I can't order the flag without knowing your e-mail address. ;-)

                Please send your email address to the Yahoo Group in a creative manner that looks like text to avoid it's being filtered out by Yahoo. For example, ABC at xyz dot org .

                We could have used one at the Dayton Hamvention last weekend.

                Thanks & 73

                Gary Wilson, K2GW

              • Don Poaps
                I don t know what the big deal is about Papal. I sell radio s through our company on eBay. I ve been a good seller and we also buy products on EBay. I don t
                Message 7 of 19 , May 27, 2009
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                  I don't know what the big deal is about Papal. I sell radio's through our company on eBay. I've been a good seller and we also buy products on EBay. I don't get that much Spam. 1 a week. on my business email account.  I get more junk in my junk folder from Gmail and Hotmail account.
                  For you info. The Inward cargo manifest or commercial invoice requires Email and Telephone number on it.
                   
                  Don VA7DGP
                   
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Gary Wilson
                  Sent: May 21, 2009 12:46 PM
                  To: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [ScoutRadio] Re: Radio Scouting flag

                  > If you decide to make an order, please email me your name, your contact information and your shipping address; also indicate your require quantity (min Order is 1 piece).

                  Henry:

                  I have no problem paying you through PayPal, which I use a dozen times each week without any problem, but I can't order the flag without knowing your e-mail address. ;-)

                  Please send your email address to the Yahoo Group in a creative manner that looks like text to avoid it's being filtered out by Yahoo. For example, ABC at xyz dot org .

                  We could have used one at the Dayton Hamvention last weekend.

                  Thanks & 73

                  Gary Wilson, K2GW

                • Keith Kaiser
                  Over the last few years I have organized a GeoScouting (geocaching) event at the North Star District Boy Scout Camporee in October. This year I was hoping to
                  Message 8 of 19 , May 27, 2009
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                    Over the last few years I have organized a GeoScouting (geocaching) event at the North Star District Boy Scout Camporee in October. This year I was hoping to make it a transmitter fox-hunt instead using inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and radios.

                    Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt once and that was way back in 1978 I think. I don't have the equipment or know-how so I'm looking for input on how to do this, equipment to use, etc.

                    I can be reached at the below eMail address or phone number.

                    Thanks.....

                    73's
                    Keith Kaiser
                    kcscouter@...

                    YIS/YIV
                    --Keith

                    In order to succeed, you must know what you are doing, like what you are doing, and believe in what you are doing.  -- Will Rogers

                  • Bob Bruninga
                    ... Get a bunch of the $10 FRS two-way talkabout radios and tie a rubber band around one of them and hide it a mile away. Preferably put it on low power. Then
                    Message 9 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                      > ...This year I was hoping to make it a
                      > transmitter fox-hunt instead using
                      > inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and
                      > radios.

                      Get a bunch of the $10 FRS two-way talkabout radios and tie a rubber band around one of them and hide it a mile away. Preferably put it on low power.

                      Then anyone with any other FRS radio - and - radio sense and experience can find it easily. You can hear signal strength by the degree of "full quieting". You can move about a map and by comparing degrees of quieting, you can find equal points of equal strength. imagine a circle through those 3 points (in your mind) and go to the center. Then repeat.

                      In a short time, you will be able to walk right to the HT.

                      Also holding the HT at your chest, and rotating your body, makes a great DF beam. Listen for the null (behind you). Just keep doing this, and walking towards the null, and you will find it. See www.aprs.org/dfing.html

                      ALthough that is an APRS web page, the technique has nothing special about APRS . You can do it without any map if you just visualize what you are doing.

                      > Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt
                      > once and that was way back in 1978 I think.
                      > I don't have the equipment or know-how so
                      > I'm looking for input on how to do this,
                      > equipment to use, etc.

                      Ah, everyone who has heard "FM quieting" and has an appreciation for what it means with respect to signal strength has the experience to do this. I think that is one of our biggest failures in practical use of HAM radio in that we imply that special DF equipment is required to find a signal. It helps, but it is never there when you need it. Therefore, we RARELY track down jammers and stuck signals because we wait for someone with "special tools and equiment" to be brought into the problem. Where as, as an army of ants we can do it ourselves sooner.

                      Yet, anyone with just a radio and expeirence with using it can find a signal with enough patience. Its a rewarding skill to pick up and practice. And a GREAT scout event, if you can get them to understand what "quieting" means.

                      Of course, all of my experience is based on a HAM HT where you can remove the antenna when you get within several hundred yards to reduce the FULL QUIETING Zone. When I get to the signal is too strong, I remove the antenna, and hold a 1" piece of wire in the antenna jack and continue to swish and sway my way to the signal source. Within the last 100 yards or so, you remove the antenna entirely...

                      The way to do this with a $10 FRS radio (with fixed antenna) might be to have enough aluminum foil to wrap around the HT to redunce its sensitivity by a HUGE amount. But here again, it will take some experience to figure out how to do that and still hear the speaker?

                      But BODY DFing and "quieting" signal strength assessment WORKS, if you think about it, have some VHF/UHF experience, and have the patience...

                      Bob, Wb4APR
                    • Keith Kaiser
                      Bob, I ve been thinking. With Scouts and boys in general everything is about the experience. Not to say that walking around with an HT and trying to find a fox
                      Message 10 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                        Bob,

                        I've been thinking. With Scouts and boys in general everything is about the experience. Not to say that walking around with an HT and trying to find a fox isn't fun or educational... for an adult. But I don't think the boys will get as much out of it as compared to swinging around some kind of antenna at the same time. It's a matter of coolness!

                        I would love to hand them something that looks like an Arrow Satellite Antenna but made of dowel rod and a few pieces of wire coat hanger even knowing the quality is not there. What they see is something they can build, it works, they can hold in their hands and they can have fun with.....wallah... more Amateur Radio Operators in the future. I fear handing them just a HT is going to lead to more goofing around with the channel selector than an earnest hunt for the fox.

                        I'll have to start googling for the antenna design but there must be one out there someplace.

                        Thoughts?


                        On May 28, 2009, at 6:34 AM, Bob Bruninga wrote:



                        > ...This year I was hoping to make it a 
                        > transmitter fox-hunt instead using 
                        > inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and
                        > radios.

                        Get a bunch of the $10 FRS two-way talkabout radios and tie a rubber band around one of them and hide it a mile away. Preferably put it on low power.

                        Then anyone with any other FRS radio - and - radio sense and experience can find it easily. You can hear signal strength by the degree of "full quieting". You can move about a map and by comparing degrees of quieting, you can find equal points of equal strength. imagine a circle through those 3 points (in your mind) and go to the center. Then repeat.

                        In a short time, you will be able to walk right to the HT.

                        Also holding the HT at your chest, and rotating your body, makes a great DF beam. Listen for the null (behind you). Just keep doing this, and walking towards the null, and you will find it. See www.aprs.org/ dfing.html

                        ALthough that is an APRS web page, the technique has nothing special about APRS . You can do it without any map if you just visualize what you are doing.

                        > Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt 
                        > once and that was way back in 1978 I think. 
                        > I don't have the equipment or know-how so 
                        > I'm looking for input on how to do this, 
                        > equipment to use, etc.

                        Ah, everyone who has heard "FM quieting" and has an appreciation for what it means with respect to signal strength has the experience to do this. I think that is one of our biggest failures in practical use of HAM radio in that we imply that special DF equipment is required to find a signal. It helps, but it is never there when you need it. Therefore, we RARELY track down jammers and stuck signals because we wait for someone with "special tools and equiment" to be brought into the problem. Where as, as an army of ants we can do it ourselves sooner.

                        Yet, anyone with just a radio and expeirence with using it can find a signal with enough patience. Its a rewarding skill to pick up and practice. And a GREAT scout event, if you can get them to understand what "quieting" means.

                        Of course, all of my experience is based on a HAM HT where you can remove the antenna when you get within several hundred yards to reduce the FULL QUIETING Zone. When I get to the signal is too strong, I remove the antenna, and hold a 1" piece of wire in the antenna jack and continue to swish and sway my way to the signal source. Within the last 100 yards or so, you remove the antenna entirely...

                        The way to do this with a $10 FRS radio (with fixed antenna) might be to have enough aluminum foil to wrap around the HT to redunce its sensitivity by a HUGE amount. But here again, it will take some experience to figure out how to do that and still hear the speaker?

                        But BODY DFing and "quieting" signal strength assessment WORKS, if you think about it, have some VHF/UHF experience, and have the patience...

                        Bob, Wb4APR


                        73's
                        Keith Kaiser



                      • kc8yjj
                        Keith, I do a fox hunt at our summer camp as an embellishment to the Radio Merit Badge. I do it as an option and invite anyone else in camp to join in as well.
                        Message 11 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                          Keith, I do a fox hunt at our summer camp as an embellishment to the Radio Merit Badge. I do it as an option and invite anyone else in camp to join in as well. Last year I had the camp director join in.
                           
                          What I have been using is a PicCon from Byonics and a old Icom 2at on low power and a resistor for an antenna. I put them into groups of 2 to 3 and show them how to do a body fade, give them a map and compass and let them hear the fox and then set them loose. I use several hand helds that I either own or barrow. Some of the boys go on and get their ticket over the winter and bring their own gear and antennas. It seems to grow each year.
                           
                          The hard part for me is hiding it with out them knowing I am hiding it. To fix that, I also work as an Assistant Ranger, so I am all over the camp during the day, so unless they are watching all day, they don't figure it out.
                           
                          I tell them to listen, do the body fade, use the compass to get a bearing, then plot it on the map. Then everyone switches jobs as they get closer.
                           
                          They actually do quite well, even the Camp Director   :-)
                           
                          Gary
                           
                          KC8YJJ
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2009 12:54 AM
                          Subject: [ScoutRadio] Fox hunting at Camporee

                          Over the last few years I have organized a GeoScouting (geocaching) event at the North Star District Boy Scout Camporee in October. This year I was hoping to make it a transmitter fox-hunt instead using inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and radios.

                          Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt once and that was way back in 1978 I think. I don't have the equipment or know-how so I'm looking for input on how to do this, equipment to use, etc.

                          I can be reached at the below eMail address or phone number.

                          Thanks.....

                          73's
                          Keith Kaiser
                          kcscouter@gmail. com

                          YIS/YIV
                          --Keith

                          In order to succeed, you must know what you are doing, like what you are doing, and believe in what you are doing.  -- Will Rogers

                        • Frank Krizan
                          Take a look at http://www.iw5edi.com/ham-radio/?cheap-yagi-antennas-for-vhf-uhf,93 These J-pole driven element antennas were developed by Kent Britain, WA5VJB,
                          Message 12 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                            Take a look at http://www.iw5edi.com/ham-radio/?cheap-yagi-antennas-for-vhf-uhf,93

                            These J-pole driven element antennas were developed by Kent Britain,
                            WA5VJB, and work great for fox-hunting and LEOs. AMSAT gave demos at
                            Hamvention using one of these to work a LEO satellite.

                            Kent's original article is at http://www.wa5vjb.com/yagi-pdf/cheapyagi.pdf

                            We've used a small HT, on lowest power available, connected to a dummy
                            load and hidden under a trash can (metal) to reduce the power level.
                            Several "fake" trash cans were deployed as decoys so the scouts had to
                            do some direction finding and not just look for a trash can. We used
                            a scenario that a plane had crashed and its emergency beacon was on.
                            We wanted to keep the activity in a reasonably confined area. The
                            scouts were told they could not approach the downed plane (trash can)
                            because it was transporting a dangerous bacteriological payload and
                            special help had to be summoned. When found, the scouts were to use
                            an FRS radio to call in their group's find and use a "decoder chart"
                            to identify the trash can's ID.

                            The scenario can be adjusted to fit the available area, current events
                            (such as satellite crash, lost hiker, etc.). It's also fun to play
                            "20 questions" in which scouts get to ask the lost hiker a question,
                            in a round robin method or using Net Control, and the lost hiker can
                            only answer using Morse Y or N. Story is the hiker radioed in that he
                            was lost and then his mike broke. He only knew the letters Y and N.
                            Everyone can hear the answers and have a map. Based on the answers,
                            the teams move closer to the lost hiker. Questions are related to
                            features on the map: Can you see a body of water? Can you see a
                            building? The lost hiker does not have a map and can only respond
                            based on his viewpoint. Add to the scenario that the hiker may have a
                            broken leg and can't move around, so he only has a limited view.

                            73, Frank KR1ZAN
                            Garland, TX


                            On May 28, 2009, at 11:09 AM, Keith Kaiser wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            > Bob,
                            >
                            >
                            > I've been thinking. With Scouts and boys in general everything is
                            > about the experience. Not to say that walking around with an HT and
                            > trying to find a fox isn't fun or educational... for an adult. But I
                            > don't think the boys will get as much out of it as compared to
                            > swinging around some kind of antenna at the same time. It's a matter
                            > of coolness!
                            >
                            > I would love to hand them something that looks like an Arrow
                            > Satellite Antenna but made of dowel rod and a few pieces of wire
                            > coat hanger even knowing the quality is not there. What they see is
                            > something they can build, it works, they can hold in their hands and
                            > they can have fun with.....wallah... more Amateur Radio Operators in
                            > the future. I fear handing them just a HT is going to lead to more
                            > goofing around with the channel selector than an earnest hunt for
                            > the fox.
                            >
                            > I'll have to start googling for the antenna design but there must be
                            > one out there someplace.
                            >
                            > Thoughts?
                            >
                            >
                            > On May 28, 2009, at 6:34 AM, Bob Bruninga wrote:
                            >
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> > ...This year I was hoping to make it a
                            >> > transmitter fox-hunt instead using
                            >> > inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and
                            >> > radios.
                            >>
                            >> Get a bunch of the $10 FRS two-way talkabout radios and tie a
                            >> rubber band around one of them and hide it a mile away. Preferably
                            >> put it on low power.
                            >>
                            >> Then anyone with any other FRS radio - and - radio sense and
                            >> experience can find it easily. You can hear signal strength by the
                            >> degree of "full quieting". You can move about a map and by
                            >> comparing degrees of quieting, you can find equal points of equal
                            >> strength. imagine a circle through those 3 points (in your mind)
                            >> and go to the center. Then repeat.
                            >>
                            >> In a short time, you will be able to walk right to the HT.
                            >>
                            >> Also holding the HT at your chest, and rotating your body, makes a
                            >> great DF beam. Listen for the null (behind you). Just keep doing
                            >> this, and walking towards the null, and you will find it. See www.aprs.org/dfing.html
                            >>
                            >> ALthough that is an APRS web page, the technique has nothing
                            >> special about APRS . You can do it without any map if you just
                            >> visualize what you are doing.
                            >>
                            >> > Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt
                            >> > once and that was way back in 1978 I think.
                            >> > I don't have the equipment or know-how so
                            >> > I'm looking for input on how to do this,
                            >> > equipment to use, etc.
                            >>
                            >> Ah, everyone who has heard "FM quieting" and has an appreciation
                            >> for what it means with respect to signal strength has the
                            >> experience to do this. I think that is one of our biggest failures
                            >> in practical use of HAM radio in that we imply that special DF
                            >> equipment is required to find a signal. It helps, but it is never
                            >> there when you need it. Therefore, we RARELY track down jammers and
                            >> stuck signals because we wait for someone with "special tools and
                            >> equiment" to be brought into the problem. Where as, as an army of
                            >> ants we can do it ourselves sooner.
                            >>
                            >> Yet, anyone with just a radio and expeirence with using it can find
                            >> a signal with enough patience. Its a rewarding skill to pick up and
                            >> practice. And a GREAT scout event, if you can get them to
                            >> understand what "quieting" means.
                            >>
                            >> Of course, all of my experience is based on a HAM HT where you can
                            >> remove the antenna when you get within several hundred yards to
                            >> reduce the FULL QUIETING Zone. When I get to the signal is too
                            >> strong, I remove the antenna, and hold a 1" piece of wire in the
                            >> antenna jack and continue to swish and sway my way to the signal
                            >> source. Within the last 100 yards or so, you remove the antenna
                            >> entirely...
                            >>
                            >> The way to do this with a $10 FRS radio (with fixed antenna) might
                            >> be to have enough aluminum foil to wrap around the HT to redunce
                            >> its sensitivity by a HUGE amount. But here again, it will take some
                            >> experience to figure out how to do that and still hear the speaker?
                            >>
                            >> But BODY DFing and "quieting" signal strength assessment WORKS, if
                            >> you think about it, have some VHF/UHF experience, and have the
                            >> patience...
                            >>
                            >> Bob, Wb4APR
                            >>
                            >
                            > 73's
                            > Keith Kaiser
                            > wa0tjt@...
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
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                          • Bill Noyce
                            Some fox-hunters use antennas where the elements are made of steel measuring tape, on a boom of PVC pipe. Some designs : 2-element
                            Message 13 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                              Some fox-hunters use antennas where the elements are made of steel
                              measuring tape, on a boom of PVC pipe. Some designs :
                              2-element http://home.att.net/~jleggio/projects/rdf/snif_bm.htm
                              3-element http://home.att.net/~jleggio/projects/rdf/tape_bm.htm

                              -- Bill, AB1AV
                            • Keith Kaiser
                              This looks great. The kids would go nuts carrying this around looking for the fox. I can make up 5 or 6 of these in no time and find some older VX-2r radios
                              Message 14 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                                This looks great. The kids would go nuts carrying this around looking for the fox. I can make up 5 or 6 of these in no time and find some older VX-2r radios maybe to use. 

                                Other; please keep the ideas coming.... I think we are getting there.


                                On May 28, 2009, at 2:26 PM, Bill Noyce wrote:



                                Some fox-hunters use antennas where the elements are made of steel
                                measuring tape, on a boom of PVC pipe. Some designs :
                                2-element http://home. att.net/~ jleggio/projects /rdf/snif_ bm.htm
                                3-element http://home. att.net/~ jleggio/projects /rdf/tape_ bm.htm

                                -- Bill, AB1AV


                                73's
                                Keith Kaiser



                              • n5gui
                                ... I think this is a good idea inject technology into Scouting activities. My thanks to wa0tjt, Keith, and the other responders. I would like to borrow a
                                Message 15 of 19 , May 28, 2009
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                                  --- In ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com, Keith Kaiser <wa0tjt@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Over the last few years I have organized a GeoScouting (geocaching)
                                  > event at the North Star District Boy Scout Camporee in October. This
                                  > year I was hoping to make it a transmitter fox-hunt instead using
                                  > inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and radios.
                                  >
                                  > ... I'm looking for input on how to do this, equipment to use, etc.
                                  > .....

                                  I think this is a good idea inject technology into Scouting activities. My thanks to wa0tjt, Keith, and the other responders.

                                  I would like to borrow a little from WB4APR, Bob, about using FRS radios, so that the hunt can be used by Scouts that don't have licensed radio amateur support ( please no flames.... I know this is a group trying to encourage amateur radio in Scouting ), but also include the "coolness" of a pointable antenna, perhaps even made by the Scouts as part of the activity.

                                  Not long ago I saw an article where a handheld transceiver was mounted in place of a driven element on the structure of a homebrew Yagi. The function of a parasitic element, be it reflector or director, does not depend on the driven element being the classic design. It will certainly not be optimal for the antenna, but give it a try. The gain should be able to boost the range of the fox as well as the sensitivity of the hunters. If used on the fox, it should also add directionality to the pattern as well.

                                  Here is another idea to try: Put the receiver in front of a snow disk and see if it exhibits any improvement in sensing the direction of the fox. No snow disk? Try a garbage can lid! Once you find a "sweet spot" tie three or four strings from the lip of the reflector. When you want to take a reading, the strings mark the relative placement from the HT to the reflector.

                                  Good hunting all.

                                  James
                                  n5gui
                                • Mike Lukas
                                  I used some old cb equipment and just a loop on a stick ...crude but it works and make them work as a team... To: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com From:
                                  Message 16 of 19 , May 29, 2009
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                                    I used some old cb equipment and just a loop on a stick ...crude but it works and make them work as a team...


                                    To: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: kc8yjj@...
                                    Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 11:35:52 -0400
                                    Subject: Re: [ScoutRadio] Fox hunting at Camporee




                                    Keith, I do a fox hunt at our summer camp as an embellishment to the Radio Merit Badge. I do it as an option and invite anyone else in camp to join in as well. Last year I had the camp director join in.
                                     
                                    What I have been using is a PicCon from Byonics and a old Icom 2at on low power and a resistor for an antenna. I put them into groups of 2 to 3 and show them how to do a body fade, give them a map and compass and let them hear the fox and then set them loose. I use several hand helds that I either own or barrow. Some of the boys go on and get their ticket over the winter and bring their own gear and antennas. It seems to grow each year.
                                     
                                    The hard part for me is hiding it with out them knowing I am hiding it. To fix that, I also work as an Assistant Ranger, so I am all over the camp during the day, so unless they are watching all day, they don't figure it out.
                                     
                                    I tell them to listen, do the body fade, use the compass to get a bearing, then plot it on the map. Then everyone switches jobs as they get closer.
                                     
                                    They actually do quite well, even the Camp Director   :-)
                                     
                                    Gary
                                     
                                    KC8YJJ
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2009 12:54 AM
                                    Subject: [ScoutRadio] Fox hunting at Camporee


                                    Over the last few years I have organized a GeoScouting (geocaching) event at the North Star District Boy Scout Camporee in October. This year I was hoping to make it a transmitter fox-hunt instead using inexpensive, handheld VHF/UHF antennas and radios.

                                    Truth be told I have only done a fox-hunt once and that was way back in 1978 I think. I don't have the equipment or know-how so I'm looking for input on how to do this, equipment to use, etc.

                                    I can be reached at the below eMail address or phone number.

                                    Thanks.....

                                    73's
                                    Keith Kaiser
                                    kcscouter@gmail. com

                                    YIS/YIV
                                    --Keith

                                    In order to succeed, you must know what you are doing, like what you are doing, and believe in what you are doing.  -- Will Rogers





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