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Antenna attachment to trees (not in Palmdale)

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  • rahwayflynn
    Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp? Driving eyes into the tree
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 16, 2008
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      Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and
      dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp?

      Driving eyes into the tree violates LNT from my perspective, and
      wrapping wire around the tree is going to damage the bark. Anyone use
      nylon webbing? Any suggestions that are LNT or minimally invasive
      would be appreciated.

      Martin
    • Joe Serocki
      I have tried nylon webbing and it has not worked well. Nylon deteriorates in the sun, and the webbing seems to attract even more sunlight, like trailer parks
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 16, 2008
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        I have tried nylon webbing and it has not worked well. Nylon deteriorates in the sun, and the webbing seems to attract even more sunlight, like trailer parks attract tornadoes.

         

        I personally have had a lot of luck with getting a nylon water ski rope over a branch, wrapping it once around a tree trunk (or lower branch) and holding it in place with a heavy duty bungee cord. Not the normal variety, but Farm and Fleet, Tractor Supply, and even my local Menards have these bungee cords on steroids that work really well. The ski rope seems to be a bit more resistant to sunlight as well.

         

        Keep in mind that ever two years it has to be changed, but that might just be this crazy Chicago weather. 100 in summer and 0 in winter. Wait, it’s technically NOT winter and it’s 4 degrees outside! Sheesh J

         

        Hope that helps

         

        Joe Serocki

         

        From: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of rahwayflynn
        Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 9:33 AM
        To: ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [ScoutRadio] Antenna attachment to trees (not in Palmdale)

         

        Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and
        dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp?

        Driving eyes into the tree violates LNT from my perspective, and
        wrapping wire around the tree is going to damage the bark. Anyone use
        nylon webbing? Any suggestions that are LNT or minimally invasive
        would be appreciated.

        Martin

      • frank@fmaynard.com
        ... Together with our camp ranger and arborist, I worked up a plan to put up pulleys and ropes in a couple trees. The arborist was going to come up with some
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 16, 2008
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          On Tue, 16 Dec 2008, rahwayflynn wrote:

          > Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and
          > dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp?

          Together with our camp ranger and arborist, I worked up a plan to put up
          pulleys and ropes in a couple trees. The arborist was going to come up
          with some kind of flexible strap arrangement to fix the pulley mount to
          the tree, rather than putting in screw hooks. We never went ahead with the
          plan, though.

          For short-term installations (weekend campout up to a week of summer camp)
          I'll use a slingshot/fishing reel combo to fly ropes up into trees. I
          just tie them off to the tree trunk by wrapping the rope and securing it
          with a suitable knot. The friction against the bark holds the line
          securely.

          --
          Yours in Scouting,
          Frank Maynard, NF8M
          CC, Troop 407; CR, Pack 54, Novi, Michigan
          Ottawa District Training Chair, Clinton Valley Council
          Trustee, WB8BSA ...and a good old Bobwhite too! (C-23-04)
        • Bill Stewart - W2BSA
          You might try to get your hands on some Dacron jacketed Kevlar rope. It s usually green or black so it s easily camouflaged and it seems to be resistant to
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 16, 2008
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            You might try to get your hands on some Dacron jacketed Kevlar rope. It's usually green or black
            so it's easily camouflaged and it seems to be resistant to ultraviolet radiation which tends to break
            down nylon. I have seen it at the following websites:
            http://www.radioworks.com/     these guys have all kinds of stuff to put up antennas in trees, etc.
            http://hamcall.net/                      these guys have some good rope and several other items for putting up antennas in trees
                                                            they also sell an of center fed dipole that works well.

            Best 73 and YIS

            Bill Stewart, W2BSA

            frank@... wrote:

            On Tue, 16 Dec 2008, rahwayflynn wrote:

            > Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and
            > dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp?

            Together with our camp ranger and arborist, I worked up a plan to put up
            pulleys and ropes in a couple trees. The arborist was going to come up
            with some kind of flexible strap arrangement to fix the pulley mount to
            the tree, rather than putting in screw hooks. We never went ahead with the
            plan, though.

            For short-term installations (weekend campout up to a week of summer camp)
            I'll use a slingshot/fishing reel combo to fly ropes up into trees. I
            just tie them off to the tree trunk by wrapping the rope and securing it
            with a suitable knot. The friction against the bark holds the line
            securely.

            --
            Yours in Scouting,
            Frank Maynard, NF8M
            CC, Troop 407; CR, Pack 54, Novi, Michigan
            Ottawa District Training Chair, Clinton Valley Council
            Trustee, WB8BSA ...and a good old Bobwhite too! (C-23-04)

          • Bill Albert
            You guys are worried about a couple of ropes thrown over some branches for a week? Arborist? Call Earth First! Call PETA! That s not even near the top of my
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 16, 2008
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              You guys are worried about a couple of ropes thrown over some branches for a week? Arborist? Call Earth First! Call PETA!

              That's not even near the top of my things to worry about at camp.

              If we even HAD trees tall enough to put a dipole in, I would use Dacron rope and two one gallon milk jugs on each end. That way the trees can move and not put the wire in a bind.

              Bill Albert
              AD5TD
              RRO 3A
              Woodsboro TX
            • n5gui
              Martin, I now live in Kansas which is not noted for abundant trees or for tall ones. I use two maple trees, about 150 feet apart, in my yard on an
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 17, 2008
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                Martin,


                I now live in Kansas which is not noted for abundant trees or for
                tall ones. I use two maple trees, about 150 feet apart, in my yard
                on an intermittant basis to string wire antennas. These trees are
                precious to me as trees as well as part of antenna support
                structure, a fact punctuated by the loss of two cotton wood, two
                scotch pines, and an oak in the decade I have lived here.

                I use screw eyes, as high up into the tree as I could comfortably
                climb with the battery powered drill I used to make the pilot hole,
                only about 25 feet. The damage done to the tree, in my opinion and
                without the benefit of any professional expertise of trees, is less
                by the drill and remaining hardware than by the act of safely
                climbing up and down.

                I grew up in Texas and saw lots of barbed wire fences running
                through live oak. I even found a mule shoe completely imbedded in a
                log we burned in our fireplace. I was pretty sure steel is not a
                major toxin to trees.

                Even so, I selected stainless steel screw eyes rather than cadmium
                plated ones. And I made sure to wash off any manufacturing oil.

                I presume that LNT stands for "leave no trace". To a casual
                inspection, I would think that broken limbs from inconsiderate
                climbing, or abrasion by ropes or nylon slings, would be more
                obvious traces than the screw eyes I used. I suggest you compare
                the trace left by using one well marked and carefully maintained
                trail to each visitor blazing his or her own separate trail.

                I also presume that you have permission to setup antennas where ever
                it is you plan to camp. Perhaps the owner / operator should be
                consulted for a preference. Are you going to remove the antenna at
                the end of the camping season, then reinstall the antenna next
                year? I put a pulley in each screw eye and ran vinyl coated steel
                clothesline to make hoisting antennas faster, and without climbing
                the trees again. Leaves a "trace" by being easy to see, but reduces
                damage to the trees or to me trying to climb them, which is a higher
                priority for my home.

                As I stated, Kansas is not noted for tall trees, and mine are pretty
                small among them. As such, I frequently use poles to add a lot more
                height to the antenna wires. There is a lot of sag on a 150 foot
                run, particularly when you only start 25 feet up at the ends. As a
                result the trees more often than not serve as "permanent" anchor
                points for temporary poles supporting the antennas in use. Side
                supports were needed to hold the poles upright. Stakes in the lawn
                were fine until I needed to mow the grass. For that reason I added
                a few more anchor points, but rather than climb up into other trees,
                I used a step ladder to put the new anchor points above head height,
                and I tried to use attach points where I had trimmed limbs off close
                to the trunk. That way I did not need to drill through bark, which
                would add a new wound.

                I hope this information is useful to your desire to install "long
                term" wire antennas at a camp.

                Best Wishes, and Merry Christmas.

                James
                n5gui


                --- In ScoutRadio@yahoogroups.com, "rahwayflynn" <maflynn@...> wrote:
                >
                > Quick question on how you attach antennas to trees (long wires and
                > dipoles) for long term setup such as a resident or summer camp?
                >
                > Driving eyes into the tree violates LNT from my perspective, and
                > wrapping wire around the tree is going to damage the bark.
                Anyone use
                > nylon webbing? Any suggestions that are LNT or minimally
                invasive
                > would be appreciated.
                >
                > Martin
                >
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