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1693Re: [ScoutRadio] New Member

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  • Frank Krizan
    Dec 3, 2005
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      Howdy Dan,
       
      Sounds like you're doing everything right.  Congratulations on getting some of the scouts to get their licenses ... and, of course, congratulations to them for taking the initiative.
       
      Radios are always a problem.  Several years ago, I was Scoutmaster and had several boys get their licenses.  When we did backpacking campouts, each Patrol would depart at different times and usually take different trails -- mainly according to their skills.  I was fortunate that every Patrol had at least one licensed scout in it.  A few of the boys didn't have radios, so some of us loaned an HT for the campout to the Patrol "radioman".  This gave the scout some experience and a feeling of pride.   We emphasized the "Wilderness Protocol" for communications see http://www.tcoe.trinity.k12.ca.us/~tcarc/tcproto.html  and  http://www.arrl.org/contests/rate-sheet/?issue=2005-07-13
       
      Our troop had various fund raisers during the year, mainly to raise money for Summer Camp fees or high adventure camps.  We allowed scouts to use the monies earned for camps, uniforms, dues, camping equipment and amateur radio equipment.  Several of them were able to earn enough money to buy an HT.  HTs also make a great Christmas gift (the parents may need the suggestion). 
       
      Encourage the scouts to investigate various aspects of the hobby and to make reports to their Patrol, troop and others (i.e., satellites, antennas, safety, ISS, APRS, CW, digital, the ionosphere, etc).  This helps develop investigative, presentation and other communications skills and almost always can be used toward a rank or merit badge requirement.  Often, this type of investigation leads to broader interests on the part of new Hams.  Ask the licensed scouts to give a program/presentation on Ham Radio to the rest of the troop, another troop or a Cub Scout Den/Pack.  Your scouts might even consider setting up a Fox Hunt demo/challenge at an upcoming Camporee.
       
      Consider doing something special with the licensed and other interested scouts.  The North American QSO Party is a neat 12 hour contest (3rd Saturday of Jan and Aug).  For us in TX, it runs from Noon to midnight.  Participants can experience the bands opening and closing from 10 m to 160 m over the 12 hour span.  There's also some VHF/UHF contests that are a blast.  Our Venturing Crew has an amateur radio specialty and we enjoy the NAQPs and Field Day.  We also help with Guides on the Air in February and Jamboree on the Air in October.  You might consider establishing a Venturing Crew associated with your Troop which has an amateur radio specialty to allow the licensed scouts to "grow" into the Crew.
       
      Also, contact some area Ham Clubs to see if they would be interested in helping with your programs.  See http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml  They might have equipment that could be loaned to scouts, sold at a bargain, donated, etc.   Plus, this way you're not the only person providing support.
       
      I'm sure you'll get some other excellent comments on this forum.  Lots of wonderful guys around here.
       
      73, Frank KR1ZAN
      Garland, TX
      Associate Advisor, Venturing Crew 73 - Richardson, TX  http://www.qsl.net/k5bsa
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Dan
      Sent: Saturday, December 03, 2005 1:01 AM
      Subject: [ScoutRadio] New Member

      Hey everyone,
           Just thought I would introduce myself.  My name is Dan, AB8VE. 
      I am currently a student at the Ohio State University, and the
      President of the OSU Amateur Radio Club.  I am also an Eagle Scout. 
      I have concerned lately as to the lack of knowledge of amateur radio
      to the general public.  I have tried on campus to get people
      interested in the hobby, and had some luck but not a whole lot.  I
      have come to the conclusion that in order to get people interested
      the best way is to hook them while they're young.  Then I got to
      thinking.  I learned about ham radio for the first time through the
      Boy Scouts.  What a great place to go to get new members.  Now, my
      little brother is still in the Scouts, and have gone camping with
      his troop several times.  I always brings my radios along and all
      the kids are really intersted in it and some have gotten their
      license.  But the kids don't have the money to get a radio a lot of
      the times and quickly lose interest.  So I found this group in hopes
      that I could get some ideas on how to hook em while they're young
      and keep em.

      73's

      Dan, AB8VE





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