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Re: What do you do with your Scorbot?

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  • Gerry
    Hey Folks, I haven t made a post here for quite some time. I have been busy finishing up school and coordinating a new Job, so needless to say things have been
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 15, 2012
      Hey Folks,

      I haven't made a post here for quite some time. I have been busy finishing up school and coordinating a new Job, so needless to say things have been a little crazy for me.

      However,
      I'm slowly getting back into my Robotics, I have worked on things off and on, working with some Pneumatics and hydraulics.


      Anyhow,
      In regards to "What to do with your Scorbots" I just wanted to add that a friend of mine mounted his Robot in an inverted position, which allowed the Robot to have access to a larger surface area of the table it was working with.

      He had to take into account the distance of the table top, as to not cause any collisions with the robot but he said the programming was still doable.

      He used 2 separate 1/4" Steal plates with threaded couplings welded to them as seen in the image below:

      http://www.digital-circuitry.com/IMAGES/Scorbot/Scorbot_Coupling_Mounts/Steel_plate_threded_coupling.jpg


      He had one bolted to the bottom base of the Robot arm, and another bolted to the Floor Joists on the Ceiling. He then used a 1 1/2" Diameter steel Pipe, about 3 feet long that was threaded on both ends. He screwed one end into the coupling mounted on the ceiling as seen in this Image below:

      http://www.digital-circuitry.com/IMAGES/Scorbot/Scorbot_Coupling_Mounts/Ceiling_Coupling.jpg

      the other end of the Pipe he screwed into the coupling mounted on the bottom of the Robot Base.

      The pipe was about 3 feet Long and so when mounted, the robot is positioned upside down and about 3 feet from the top of the Ceiling.

      SHOWN BELOW:
      (A concept Image of an Robotics arm Mounted in an Inverted position)
      I'll have to get some real pictures from him to post.

      http://i.istockimg.com/file_thumbview_approve/9996613/2/stock-photo-9996613-robotic-arm.jpg


      He then used standard Drop-down ceiling tiles that many of us have installed in our basements. He then cut a whole in one of the tiles to cover up the exposed floor joists.

      This is a common method that many schools or Universities will Mount classroom Video Projectors to the ceiling.

      http://www.digital-circuitry.com/IMAGES/Scorbot/Scorbot_Coupling_Mounts/Projector_Mount.jpg


      The all steel Pipe is extremely Solid and will hold a significant amount of weight, so it's really solid. You could always install 2 Pipes side by side if you were at all concerned. :)

      I'll share some more ideas when I can. :)
      Fun Stuff!!

      Cheers Folks!
      -Gerry




      --- In ScorbotUserGroup@yahoogroups.com, mark hubrich <meistro57@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yeah im in the north too. Time to get the heat fired up out there in the
      > garage. I have lots of pics made public on google+ and Picasa. Movies too.
      > Look me up meistro57.
      >
      > Im starting to gear myself up to implement a 16" tilting rotary. Im going
      > to mount my 8" rotary on it. Then I'll have 6 axis to keep me entertained
      > through the winter. Plus the scorbots :-).
      > On Nov 15, 2012 2:44 AM, "Omri Koppel" <okoppel@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Scorbot Guys.****
      > >
      > > Winter is here (on the northern hem.) and it is project time I guess.****
      > >
      > > Post some videos on Youtube. (ask your kids how)****
      > >
      > > Mark. This is definitely worth your while.****
      > >
      > > Grab another beer bottle and a video camera.****
      > >
      > > Send us the linkĀ…. I am sure you will have at least 10 views till XmasJ***
      > > *
      > >
      > > ** **
      > >
      > > Omri****
      > >
      > > ** **
      > >
      > > *From:* ScorbotUserGroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
      > > ScorbotUserGroup@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *mark hubrich
      > > *Sent:* Wednesday, November 14, 2012 8:46 PM
      > > *To:* ScorbotUserGroup@yahoogroups.com
      > > *Subject:* Re: [ScorbotUserGroup] What do you do with your Scorbot?****
      > >
      > > ** **
      > >
      > > ****
      > >
      > > I'll chime in :) ****
      > >
      > > I had all this stuff you mention going on in my garage at one time. One
      > > thing lead to another etc.. etc. You know the saying... time for play has
      > > become scarce for me. When I finally do have some time to play, I grab a
      > > beer, head for the garage, flip on the lights, and spend the rest of my
      > > precious time trying to decide what toys I want to play with. Then the
      > > empty beer hits the garbage, the lights go out, then I go inside and go to
      > > bed.****
      > >
      > > But here's what I have in there that's related to robots and cnc..****
      > >
      > > To make the long story shorter.. I bought an old Shibiru Riobot pick and
      > > place robot on ebay. I drove 200 miles round trip to have it too. This was
      > > intended to be the upgrade to the MDF router table I made. The travel is
      > > 20"x20" with 9" Z travel. I tried the machine with the controller it came
      > > with and it gave me some error. I then stripped the DC servo motors and put
      > > my 403oz steppers on it. I made a controller from a HobbyCNCPro kit. The
      > > drivetrain for the new table is very sweet. X and Y is driven on commercial
      > > linear bearing slides with 1"per turn ball screws. The Z is .5" per turn.
      > > This means I get very very high performance from this old robot. The
      > > steppers can now operate slower where all the torque is. 1 rotation means
      > > one inch of travel. I made a mount for a 2.5hp plunge router with 1/2"
      > > shank. It cuts large amounts of material very fast. ****
      > >
      > > I bought an old 8" Haas Rotary with an 8" lathe chuck from a friend.
      > > There's a 4th axis :) . There's more to it but I'll get closer to the
      > > point.. I collected a Scorbot er4u, USB controller for it, Scorbot er5, er5
      > > controller, Scorbot pneumatic vise, Scorbot parts feeder tray, 48" linear
      > > Scorbot base. ****
      > >
      > > I made a few 1/2" steel plate back plates with a 1-1/4" pipe welded to the
      > > center. I use these to hold 12" diameter logs with four 1/2"dia. lag bolts.
      > > I carved up one of my Oak logs to 4 flat sides. The log is now a tombstone
      > > style jig that hosts 4 pneumatic vises. (except I only have one vise right
      > > now, I have to make more) I have one Scorbot on the slide base on the right
      > > side of the cnc setup. It can reach the rotary log jig easily. This Scorbot
      > > will probably be the "remove the finished part" robot since it can travel
      > > over to a debur station and debur or whatever before stacking the part. The
      > > other Scorbot will be mounted close to the other side of the rotary jig to
      > > load blanks. This will double my production speed. The process goes like
      > > this...****
      > >
      > > 1, Left Scorbot grabs a blank from the feeder and loads the vise on the
      > > left side of the rotary.****
      > >
      > > 2, The cnc machine is running the program and cutting the part in the vise
      > > on top of the rotary. Step 1 is completing its process of loading at same
      > > time.****
      > >
      > > 3, The right Scorbot is unloading the vise on the right side of the
      > > rotary. Same time as 1 and 2 is happening. ****
      > >
      > > 4, Once all 3 stations have changed to "complete" status, the rotary turns
      > > 90deg. and the whole process starts over. ****
      > >
      > > Your thinking, what is going to happen to the hoses for 4 vises as this
      > > thing keeps cycling 90deg. I have that figured out. The raw air supply is
      > > fed into a manifold at the center of rotation. At the other center through
      > > the chuck I'll have a couple brushes contacting an armature to provide
      > > 24vDC to power the 4 solenoids for the vises. I'll have an Arduino in a
      > > hollowed out section of the rotary log jig. It will get regulated 5vDC from
      > > the main 24vDC source****
      > >
      > > Crap I'll have to finish this post later...****
      > >
      > > To be continued. ..****
      > >
      > > On Mon, Nov 12, 2012 at 10:53 AM, Keith Mc <acti@...> wrote:****
      > >
      > > ****
      > >
      > > [moved from "Re: [ScorbotUserGroup] Dual Scorbot Arm Concept"****
      > >
      > > Hmmm... NO thoughts at ALL, for ANY good use for a "Dual Scorbot Arm
      > > System"?
      > > (...or any of the variants, eg with a turntable, a linear axis, et al...)*
      > > ***
      > >
      > > So OOC... What do you own now, and what ARE you doing with it?
      > > Also... How much does your Scorbot really get used on a regular basis?
      > > Do you use if for: School instruction? Just playing with it for fun?
      > > Assembly? Sorting tasks? Servicing some other machine?
      > > Making money with it [if so, HOW]? Making a personal FMS? ... or what?****
      > >
      > > I'll start - I'm slowly making a personal FMS for low volume,
      > > fist-sized (small, light) items, using some DIY CNC machines
      > > that are currently under construction, and/or rebuild. My several
      > > Scorbot-III arms are reserved for "servicing the line", in one way
      > > or another,.mostly with very simple light Pick-N-Place work.
      > > They will use mainly custom fingers sets, but some may end up
      > > with replacement end effectors.****
      > >
      > > ... My first Scorbot app will be as a Tool Changer for my CNC micro-mill.
      > > ... The second is for my Scorbot on a linear slide for moving parts
      > > around, between stations & conveyors.****
      > >
      > > MY CHALLENGE: The basic default Scorbot finger set is cute for demos,
      > > but are actually insufficient for general work, especially because parts
      > > before and after machining typically have different shapes.
      > > One solution is to use TWO arms for the job, each with different
      > > finger sets. A second is to design a "dual" or "swapping gripper"
      > > where there are two finger sets on one arm - one for before,
      > > and one for after machining.****
      > >
      > > BUT, has anyone here ever come up with a SIMPLE "wrist change-out
      > > system" mod/design/hack for Scorbot-III arms, so we can EASILY
      > > change out ENTIRE finger sets, or end effectors as it works?****
      > >
      > > - Keith Mc.
      > > ?****
      > >
      > > ** **
      > >
      > > ****
      > >
      > >
      >
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