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The 31 Days of Hallowe'en - Make Your Own Zombie

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  • brent wodehouse
    http://www.bathroomreader.com MAKE YOUR OWN ZOMBIE *If you thought zombies were just a bit of folklore, think again.* ZOMBIES In 1982, a Canadian ethnobotanist
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2011
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      http://www.bathroomreader.com

      MAKE YOUR OWN ZOMBIE

      *If you thought zombies were just a bit of folklore, think again.*


      ZOMBIES

      In 1982, a Canadian ethnobotanist named Wade Davis went to
      Haiti, where he met a man who claimed he'd been turned into a
      zombie and forced to work on a sugar plantation. Davis tracked
      down a _bokor_, a "voodoo wizard," who claimed to be able to make
      "zombie powder." The powder was sprinkled on the doorstep of the victim,
      who would absorb the powder through his feet and die. The bokor would dig
      the person up and - voila - a zombie.
      Eventually Davis managed to get eight samples of the powder, which he
      ran through the gamut of scientific testing. His tests found a neurotoxin
      called tetrodoxin, which you can get from puffer fish, or _fugu_, found in
      Haitian waters. Tetrodoxin can paralyze you, making your breathing so
      shallow
      it would be easy to miss. Davis gave the powder to a pathologist, who
      tested
      it on rats.
      After 24 hours, the rats revived with no ill effect. The final step in
      creating a zombie requires something to scramble your faculties.Davis
      believes
      the secret is a hallucinogenic drug called datura.
      These findings made Davis something of a celebrity. He wrote a 1985
      bestseller,
      _The Serpent and the Rainbow_, which he sold to Hollywood. The resulting
      horror movie
      belittled the voodoo religion. Some are skeptical of Davis's theory. Two
      tetrodoxin
      experts, C. Y. Kao and Takeshi Yasumoto, tested Davis's samples, but
      couldn't find
      enough tetrodoxin to have any effect.


      VAMPIRES AND WEREWOLVES

      In 1985, Canadian biochemist David Dolphin fingered a blood
      disease called porphyria as an explanation for vampirism. People
      with congenital erythropoietic porphyria are extremely sensitive
      to light, sometimes have psychological problems, and supposedly
      their symptoms worsen if they eat garlic. Porphyria sufferers have
      been down this road before. In 1964, it was said that porphyria caused
      lycanthropy -
      the delusion that you're a werewolf. While people with porphyria may not
      turn into
      vampires or werewolves, they do turn into kings and queens. The genetic
      disease worked
      its way into many of Europe's royal families, including Britain's.



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