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Re: The Work for Hire conundrum

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  • ravenadal
    As Alexandre Dumas pere employed a large contingent of ghost writers for his formula novels, it has been said, nobody has read everything of Dumas, not even
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 31, 2007
      As Alexandre Dumas pere employed a large contingent of ghost writers
      for his formula novels, it has been said, "nobody has read everything
      of Dumas, not even Dumas himself". There is another version of this
      anecdote: Dumas pere asked his (illegitimate) son, author Alexandre
      Dumas fils, whether he had read his new novel yet. "No," his son
      replied. "Have you?"

      ~rave!

      --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Hayden" <Frofidemus@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > (It has been long whispered in the writing world that almost all
      best
      > selling authors use ghosts.
      >
      > It is not a new practice, going back at least to Alexandre Dumas
      > pere, though it is stated that he at least wrote the final drafts
      > himself in his own handwriting.
      >
      > When you get to the point where the author's name is bigger than
      the
      > title the author is selling the books. This means it is a business
      > thang.
      >
      > --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, "ravenadal" <ravenadal@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > While surfing one night I came across one of those publishing
      > > phenomena that both amaze and confound me. It concerns the
      author,
      > > V.C. Andrews, author of the 1979 best seller "Flowers in the
      > Attic."
      > > Cleo Virginia Andrews died in 1986, yet she has been more
      prolific
      > in
      > > death than she was in life. Her estate hired a ghost writer,
      > Andrew
      > > Neiderman (which is noteworthy because Cleo Virginia wrote as a
      man
      > > and now Mr. Neiderman is writing as a woman - the first time,
      > > allegedly, a man has written as a woman), to write more stories
      to
      > be
      > > published under her name. I don't know what Mr. Neiderman's deal
      > with
      > > the estate is but he has been so prolific, he must be getting
      paid
      > by
      > > the word. Since V.C. Andrews death, fifty-eight novels have been
      > > produced under her name with two more due this year.
      > >
      > > ~rave!
      > >
      > > --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Hayden"
      <Frofidemus@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I just ran across a proposal to write a novel on a work for
      hire
      > > > basis. The money offered would be nice--nicer than any other
      > money
      > > > I've made writing--
      > > >
      > > > But visions of Siegel and Shuster and Jack Kirby and Stan Lee,
      > who
      > > > missed out on a fortune because they signed those work for hire
      > > > agreements, keep flashing through my head.
      > > >
      > > > As you know, you surrender all rights in return for the money.
      > So
      > > > they can reprint your work as often as they like. And you don't
      > get
      > > > paid. And use any characters you create for them. And you
      don't
      > > get
      > > > paid.
      > > >
      > > > We ain't even talking about movies, DVD's, toys, tv programs,
      > > > clothes, ancillary stuff--
      > > >
      > > > While I have not created a Superman, Spider-Man, Harry Potter--
      > why
      > > > take a chance?
      > > >
      > > > This would lead to me not creating anything and not doing my
      best
      > > > work--so they probably wouldn't accept it anyway.
      > > >
      > > > Who if anybody should ever sign a work for hire agreement?
      > > >
      > >
      >
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