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Re: [SciFiNoir Lit] Re: My Intro

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  • Mine
    Thanks for the warm welcome. I liked Kindred too. Couldn t put it down. I think her language became even better in her later works though. (And it was already
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 18, 2006
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      Thanks for the warm welcome.

      I liked Kindred too. Couldn't put it down. I think her language became even
      better in her later works though. (And it was already very good in Kindred.)
      I don't know all the other books you mentioned. Will investigate. :)

      Mine


      On 10/18/06, Carole McDonnell <Oreoblues@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Mine!
      >
      > Nice meeting you.
      >
      > Am in NY also -- about 33 miles north of NYC.
      >
      > I like Octavia too: Kindred.
      >
      > Fave SF books: The Prince of Elfland's Daughter (Lord Dunsany), The
      > Children of Men (PD James), The Day Boy and the Night Girl (George
      > MacDonald), Til we have faces, Screwtape Letters, Pilgrim's Regress
      > (C S Lewis)
      >
      > --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com <SciFiNoir_Lit%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > Mine <oankali11@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi -
      > > I'm so happy to have found this group!
      > >
      > > 1. Name: Mine'
      > > 2. Location: Harlem, New York
      > > 3. Nickname/ Alias:
      > > 4. Favorite Speculative Fiction Genres:Not so much fantasy. More
      > science
      > > fiction. Anything that explores humans' relationship with each
      > other and
      > > with "progress." Imaginative new universes...
      > > 5. Favorite Speculative Fiction Books: Dawn, Imago, Parable of
      > the Sower,
      > > Snow Crash, Schismatrix Plus
      > > 6. Favorite Speculative Fiction Authors: Octavia Butler, William
      > Gibson,
      > > some work by Neal Stephenson, some work by Bruce Sterling.
      > > 7. Favorite Speculative Fiction Characters: Need I say more?
      > Lilith
      > > ofcourse, and Lauren Olamina
      > > 8. Favorite Speculative Fiction Film or TV Adaptation of a Book:
      > It's not
      > > an adaptation of a book, but best show currently on TV in my
      > opinion is
      > > Battlestar Galactica.
      > > 9. Topics of importance to you:
      > > 10. Your views on how people of color are depicted in Speculative
      > Fiction:
      > > There are too few of them, and if they are there, they are usually
      > not the
      > > main character.
      > > 11. Your own published works, if any:
      > > 12. Your web site:
      > > 13. Your Speculative Fiction Pet Peeves:
      > > 14. Memberships in science fiction clubs:
      > > 15. Anything else you think is important: I'm sure I'll think of
      > more
      > > things as time goes by.
      > >
      > > Looking forward to good conversations.
      > > Mine
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carole McDonnell
      A lot of those I mentioned are by Christian writers so you should know that before you get to them...just in case you don t want to deal with that. Although I
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 19, 2006
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        A lot of those I mentioned are by Christian writers so you should
        know that before you get to them...just in case you don't want to
        deal with that. Although I read that when it comes to denominations
        and specfic, most are written by Mormons. Orson Scott Card being the
        example that comes to mind.

        If you like Scifi with a bit of social spiritual stuff, you could try
        the PD James book. PD is a mystery writer and a Christian. but this
        was her only SF book. She's English and Children of Men will be
        coming out this year. With my man Clive Owen. I've loved both
        Children of Men and Clive for years...and am happy both of them are
        getting known to the public.

        The King of Elfland's Daughter is pure fantasy...very beautiful but
        tough as heck to read, and very Celtic. It's by Lord Dunsany...who is
        a real genius in some ways and who is also a bit trying in other
        ways. My favorite story of his is Ghosts...and it is possibly one of
        the best scientific intellectual flash-fiction ghost story I've ever
        read. Other than that, Dunsany is an acquired taste. But one of my
        favorite scenes is when a prince marries the king of elfland's
        daughter and the priest knows trouble will come to them so he goes
        looking for a spell to protect them and the nearest thing he can come
        up with is a spell for a sailor who is marrying a mermaid. And when
        he says the spell the reader just shakes her head because any fool
        knows a speall for a mermaid who has forsaken the sea just isn't
        gonna work against the king of elfland.

        The Day boy and the night girl is by George MacDonald...another
        acquired taste and an inspiration to C S Lewis. Very nice little
        children's book about a boy raised in the day and so he's afraid of
        night and a girl raised in the night. Of course they meet when they
        escape from their respective castles and have to deal.

        Til we have faces is Lewis rendition of the Psyche-Eros love story.
        Screwtape letters is a series of letters written by an older demon to
        his young nephew (another demon) on how to seduce humans. Pilgrim's
        Regress is kinda like the Pilgrim's Progress. Intellectual and
        psychological religious story. Fun if you like theological
        games/discussions. I generally like those much better than Lewis'
        Scifi but I did like That Hideous Strength.

        Anyways, I'm pretty open to most SF. And I tend to like the
        supernatural tales from Asia and the natural-supernaturalism from
        Latin America. Stories by Borges, for instance. And definitely stuff
        like One hundred years of solitude. I like magical realism, I guess.
        Reminds me of those stories our folks told us as kids in Jamaica.

        I just tend to have favorites from the far past: Victorian, Edwardian
        times. Race definitely matters, though. Am sure in the next few
        years, I'll add some more SF written by minorities. Nice to have you
        here. -Carole



        --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, Mine <oankali11@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the warm welcome.
        >
        > I liked Kindred too. Couldn't put it down. I think her language
        became even
        > better in her later works though. (And it was already very good in
        Kindred.)
        > I don't know all the other books you mentioned. Will investigate. :)
        >
        > Mine
        >
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