Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SciFiNoir Lit] Re: Can You Write 50,000 Words in 30 Days

Expand Messages
  • Liggins Bill
    ... I ramp up for my next session by reading the previous days writing. I do some editing at this time watching plot, theme, pacing, and voice. I m more
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 8, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      --- belsidus2000 <Frofidemus@...> wrote:
      > <Do you wait until you have completed a manuscript
      > or do you edit as
      > you go?>
      >
      >

      I ramp up for my next session by reading the previous
      days writing. I do some editing at this time watching
      plot, theme, pacing, and voice. I'm more concerned
      about the story than crossing the "t's" and dotting
      the "i's."

      After my story's done (the glamor) I get into the fine
      tuning (the drudgery). That's the part that goes on
      until a publisher puts it to print.

      =====

      Bill Liggins

      Author of "WARNING," a Sci-Fi Novel

      http://www.authorsden.com/visit/author.asp?authorid=4905

      bill_liggins@...


      __________________________________
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster
      http://search.yahoo.com
    • belsidus2000
      ... is a rare piece (and usually a very short one that I have thought about a long time or outlined very carefully) that does not need drastic overhauls when I
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 8, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, Liggins Bill
        <bill_liggins@y...> wrote:
        >
        > --- belsidus2000 <Frofidemus@n...> wrote:
        > > <Do you wait until you have completed a manuscript
        > > or do you edit as
        > > you go?>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > I ramp up for my next session by reading the previous
        > days writing. I do some editing at this time watching
        > plot, theme, pacing, and voice. I'm more concerned
        > about the story than crossing the "t's" and dotting
        > the "i's."
        >
        > After my story's done (the glamor) I get into the fine
        > tuning (the drudgery). That's the part that goes on
        > until a publisher puts it to print.
        >
        > =====
        >
        > Bill Liggins
        >
        > Author of "WARNING," a Sci-Fi Novel
        >
        > http://www.authorsden.com/visit/author.asp?authorid=4905
        >
        > bill_liggins@y...
        >
        ><I usually write full bore ahead until I finish--then go back. It
        is a rare piece (and usually a very short one that I have thought
        about a long time or outlined very carefully) that does not need
        drastic overhauls when I am finished.

        Essays, newspaper columns, very short realistic fiction, business
        letters, stuff like this I can usually get in three drafts.

        Next hardest is detective/mystery and horror fiction--plotting is
        very important there and I must constantly ask my self why such and
        such happened and if it made sense along with dealing with the other
        little goodies--style, etc.

        Science fiction and poetry are the absolute hardest. Agony to do.
        Poetry can go through endless drafts and I can still be tinkering
        with it years later even after its been published. For science
        fiction I turn loose what I call my little Cybernerd who questions
        each and every word. It can be excruciating.

        Chris Hayden
        >
      • Liggins Bill
        ... Don t forget historicals and comedies. I had finished a historical novel recently, and even if it s never published I m more proud of it than any of my
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 8, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          --- belsidus2000 <Frofidemus@...> wrote:
          > ><I usually write full bore ahead until I
          > finish--then go back. It
          > is a rare piece (and usually a very short one that I
          > have thought
          > about a long time or outlined very carefully) that
          > does not need
          > drastic overhauls when I am finished.
          >
          > Essays, newspaper columns, very short realistic
          > fiction, business
          > letters, stuff like this I can usually get in three
          > drafts.
          >
          > Next hardest is detective/mystery and horror
          > fiction--plotting is
          > very important there and I must constantly ask my
          > self why such and
          > such happened and if it made sense along with
          > dealing with the other
          > little goodies--style, etc.
          >
          > Science fiction and poetry are the absolute hardest.
          > Agony to do.
          > Poetry can go through endless drafts and I can still
          > be tinkering
          > with it years later even after its been published.
          > For science
          > fiction I turn loose what I call my little Cybernerd
          > who questions
          > each and every word. It can be excruciating.
          >
          > Chris Hayden
          > >
          >

          Don't forget historicals and comedies.

          I had finished a historical novel recently, and even
          if it's never published I'm more proud of it than any
          of my other works.

          I'm too scared to do comedy. I had heard "death is
          easy . . . comedy's hard."

          =====

          Bill Liggins

          Author of "WARNING," a Sci-Fi Novel

          http://www.authorsden.com/visit/author.asp?authorid=4905

          bill_liggins@...


          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster
          http://search.yahoo.com
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.