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So Many Tears From Kobra

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  • Bert
    kobra, I guess our disagreement comes down to a matter of scale. I am aware that the forced labor of human beings still exists in some parts of the world. I
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2003
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      kobra,

      I guess our disagreement comes down to a matter of
      scale. I am aware that the forced labor of human
      beings still exists in some parts of the world. I
      stated that early on in this thread. But I haven't
      read anything lately about slave ships landing in the
      port of New Orleans and other established ports to
      off-load a new shipment of slaves. There are no more
      auctions were slaves are opening bought and sold.
      There are no large more plantations dependent on slave
      labor.

      I think what happens is that when a situation of Small
      scale forced labor is discovered and reported in the
      news it's a big story. If slavery as it was in the 17
      and 1800s still exists then we as a people have our
      priorities all mixed-up.


      Perhaps we can agree to disagree. You can call it
      slavery and I'll call it human exploitation.

      Hotep,

      Bert
      The Dawn of MAN
      www.elbertlewisjr.com



      --- kobra naghast <kobranaghast@...> wrote:
      > Bert,
      > Well, I guess we will just have to agree to
      > disagree.
      > Also, perhaps I just dont quite grasp your meaning
      > of slavery, ie.
      > "The past industry of slavery as I understand it".
      >
      > As I understand it, it still exists the same way as
      > in the past. The
      > US is by no means the only country who turns a blind
      > eye. Many
      > countries in the middle east are still raiding
      > African communities
      > for slaves, branding people, maiming them, denying
      > their rights,
      > buying/selling their children which sounds to me
      > they same as slavery
      > in the past. Perhaps there is some small way in
      > which it is better,
      > but I dont see it.
      >
      > This is not a plea for true justice, that will
      > probably never exist,
      > but it is a plea for vigilance and to recognize
      > that, unfortunately,
      > things go in a cycle. It would be nice to believe
      > that slavery is
      > over, as if humanity has advanced past it, but this
      > is not the case.
      >
      > knaghast
      >
      > --- In SciFiNoir_Lit@yahoogroups.com, Bert
      > <elbertlewisjr@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > Kobra,
      > >
      > > The situations you pointed certainly exist to some
      > > extent and are criminal. But to equate them with
      > the
      > > past industry of slavery as I understand it does
      > not
      > > hold water.
      > >
      > > In a world of six billion human beings there will
      > > never be a time when true justice
      > prevales...unless
      > > there truly is a God and he, she or it stops
      > playing
      > > games with us lowly humans.
      > >
      > > Hotep,
      > >
      > > Bert
      > > The Dawn of MAN
      > > www.elbertlewisjr.com
      > >
      > >
      > > --- kobra naghast <kobranaghast@m...> wrote:
      > > > If I may, although I respect your opinion, I
      > have to
      > > > disagree with a
      > > > few points
      > > >
      > > > First, quite a few low wage workers in the US
      > are
      > > > bought and sold.
      > > > Usually, in their home countries by other family
      > > > members in exchange
      > > > for goods and cash. Sometimes with the false
      > promise
      > > > that they will
      > > > be freed once their debt is paid in the US,
      > which of
      > > > course, never
      > > > happens. Women are particularly vulnerable,
      > > > particularly young women
      > > > who can also be coerced into the sex industry.
      > > >
      > > > Second, being a low wage worker is not like
      > living
      > > > in the lap of
      > > > luxury for a third world country. Many of these
      > > > countries have an
      > > > extremely wealthy, educated, pampered and well
      > > > connected upper class
      > > > who simply cannot or will not address the needs
      > of
      > > > the larger
      > > > population. What we can be proud of in the US,
      > is
      > > > having the rights
      > > > to protest and a history of social conciousness
      > so
      > > > that we can fight
      > > > the power structure.
      > > >
      > > > Third, many US interests, ie corporations, have
      > > > simply gotten smart
      > > > enough to hide their slavery. Gone are the old
      > south
      > > > cotton
      > > > plantations, instead have coffee plantations in
      > > > south america/africa
      > > > where you can pay the workers low wages or
      > nothing ,
      > > > transfer
      > > > (ie.sell) their children to other plantations,
      > and
      > > > physically maim or
      > > > kill people who try to escape.
      > > > knaghast
      > > >
      > > >
      >
      >
      >
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